Archivo de la categoría: Entradas

LongForm or Microcontent? An analysis of supports for digital content courseware

RED Distance Education Journal. Preprints of the special issue «Transition from conventional education to online education and learning, as a consequence of COVID19» [1] 

 

Ronei Ximenes Martins. rxmartins@ufla.br 

Nicole Santana Gomes. nicole_sgomes@unifei.edu.br

Daniela Simone Azevedo. daniela.azevedo@semed.betim.mg.gov.br

 

Formats of digital teaching material for different purposes

The evolution of educational materials that are utilized in distance education courses is categorized in different generations and is closely related to technological resources available throughout each historical moment. Such evolution happens as a consequence of technological developments, but mainly because of the acceptance of methodologies that innovate the pedagogical mediation. Knowing how to conciliate technological resources and the methodological innovation in the process of teaching can bring forth new strategies to organize the formal education curriculum also may be used as a source of data to guide educational actions in the international context of Coronavirus.

The organization of courses whose desired learning can take place in different places from where the teaching structure is located requires pedagogical mediation provided by digital information and communication technologies (DICT), as well as competent actions by teachers, students and support professionals (Moore, 2011). With the technological improvement of digital artifacts and the increase of communication velocity that occurred the last decade on the web, the pedagogical mediation started to be grounded predominantly on devices that are connected to the Internet.

Laptop or desktop computers, cellphones or tablets are examples of technologies that increasingly become more accessible and, since they present constant innovations in their functions, they constitute themselves as a fertile field for the pedagogical mediation that currently happens with integral support of digital technologies. Facing innovation and the many possibilities the Internet and its means provide, the challenge of exploring the DICT for advantage of educational processes is recognized. In this sense, it is assumed that not only the instructional design of the courses mediated by technologies must align itself to the offer platforms, but beside that, the didactic materials must be thought according to the following concepts: usability, adaptability, connection, quickness, readability, loading time, lightness, plainness and others. How like is being observed in current times, the offer of educational contents about these new devices is predominantly formed by learning objects, which conceptual base and creation methodology (Willey, 2002; Amante & Morgado, 2001) determine that the information should be divided in small units of texts, videos, images and other audiovisual resources that will be identified as Microcontent in this work.

Buchem and Hamelmann (2010, p. 02) have described Microcontent as an information published in short form, with its length dictated by the constraint of a single main topic and by the physical and technical limitations of the software and devices that we use to view digital content today. For them, the Microcontent, when utilized within a Personal Learning Environment can be easily customized and distributed, allowing a high degree of control over learning and empowering the students to shape their own learning.

Microcontent has arisen by the need to fragment the contents to make them suitable for mobile devices and other technological artifacts, according to Silva, Vieira, Pereira and Braviano (2015). According to them, “[…] Microcontent emerges as innovative elements of pedagogical practices of these new learning models” (Silva et al., 2015, p. 03). Mobile devices, such as cellphones and tablets, meet the demands of fast and dynamic life rhythm and can accomplish multitasks. Because of these characteristics, Microcontent can be composed of a text, a video, audio, a picture, a diagram, a drawing or a photo; but also, by the varied combination of these items with each other.

The partitioned content in reduced fragments “[…] is not restricted to an idea of measurement of size, but rather to a unit, a module, and as such is dependent on the context in which it is inserted” (Silva et al., 2015, p. 03). Therefore, the Microcontent is defined by the subject topic that it approached and by the characteristics of where it is inserted.

Microcontent can be used as a strategy for continuous professional development like Buchem and Hamelmann argue (2010). According to them, with modern technologies, the so-called “didactics design” is currently organized with the student as a focus. Like so, the online study environment needs to be stimulating and organized so that it is initiated and administered individually by the student, rather than just a sequential proposition of steps and previous instructions that should be strictly followed by the students. It is therefore comprehended that the content would be “[…] co-created, modified and used by students […], distributed and both inside and outside of Learning Environment. This mobility of content across various platforms is supported by its light format” (Buchem & Hamelmann, 2010, p. 06).

Learning can be the result of the fractioned content offer, according to Gabrielli, Kimani and Cartaci (2006), as long as they allow the contact with the information and also the experimentation and the access rhythm control for the students. However, the Microcontent predominance can, hypothetically, bring forth the mitigation of the study deepening and, consequently, of the content comprehension, if the students do not seek to deep to studying by other sources. Added to this, much has been discussed about the ideal quality and quantity of online information, mainly for communication companies and producers of journalistic content. In the scope of these discussions, digital journalism has inaugurated an alternative to Microcontent, denominated LongForm. This format is characterized by offering deepened information, composed by images, videos, links and infographics, beside texts, which provide, according to Longhi and Winques (2015), a more immersive and deeper experience of the covered content.

The need to look for an alternative to Microcontents appears not only in the education area but to all that utilize digital media to broadcast information. The media corporations, great users of Microcontents in its websites and portals, are among those who have been looking for other ways to spread their news. Given that the online communication industry works to gather audience by clicking, joining, sharing and engaging with its readers, communication is always innovating and improving the methods of making information available to the audience. In this sense, it is worth noting which movements that digital communications have made and also trying to use the success cases in digital mediated education.

LongForm format emerged in this scenario of searching for media innovation to a new audience. The term, defined by Longhi and Winques (2015), surpasses a simple long text, as the name seems to suggest. LongForm is a content presentation with the abundance of texts, images, videos and any other features that can offer a “[…] quality, accuracy and context rescue” (Longhi & Winques, 2015).

The abundant features of the LongForm format, which are also called multimedia elements should compose the informational material in a coordinated manner. You can insert textual elements with different fonts, various font sizes or information boxes; images highlighted by their size, color treatment, galleries or movements (e.g.  GIFs – Graphics Interchange Format); videos longer or shorter; animated or non-animated infographics and links that lead the reader to other content that complements the presented subject.

Productions that use the LongForm format present, besides multimedia items, other characteristics highlighted:

  1. a) a long and deep text, with a lot of content;
  2. b) the use of HTML5 technology to merge screen media;
  3. c) nonlinear reading;
  4. d) responsive design, in which the material is adapted to the media that the user has chosen to consume.

According to the education evolution mediated by digital technologies of information and communication, of various user profiles, of new available devices for the mediation between learner, content and teachers, presentation characteristics, potentialities and limitations of each format, it is considered that, in hypothesis, LongForm can be a viable alternative to Microcontent for educational materials production for online courses.

Each digital educational material can, along with its organizational structure, propose a sequence of paths for student navigation, starting from early stages to more complex ones. Depending on the proposed navigation path and the resources utilized in the production of the didactic materials, students may have more or less complex distance learning experiences, whether they are mobile mediated or not.

Studying through hyperlinks, distributed throughout the educational material, allows and also requires that readers choose the information they want to interact with. Still, within the analogy of self-service, readers will choose at least one among many proposed informative contents, even if at the end of the studies they are not very satisfied with their choices and realize that more choices have made than they could assimilate. Interacting with a computer system involves understanding it, making decisions, solving problems, storing concepts and processing them in order to achieve knowledge.

Teachers, designers and other professionals that work in designing courses and developing digital educational material should, therefore, make sure that hyperlinks have a thematic link with the original content; that they are distributed according to their categories and functions, that range from the presentation of the information about the subject to the deepening and exploration of the offered content; that they appear embedded in the text, highlighting its most important data through colors, keywords or media; and that they are clearly highlighted at the end of sentences or texts, avoiding noises in the process of reading.

Based on above, a question arises about what possible contributions the LongForm application, today directed to the journalistic content production, can bring to the production of educational content if compared to the Microcontent format, which is a base for online courses content. The LongForm is considered to be better adjusted to the necessities of working with more complex educational themes, owing to its architecture and composition, that is concerned with density without losing sight of the usability and to the lightness adapted to more recent information and communication technologies, especially that of mobile devices.

Research Design

In this paper, part of extensive research, there is the presentation of a comparative analysis of Microcontent and LongForm formats applied to the production of materials that are utilized for pedagogical purposes both in Distance Education and in support to the face-to-face courses.

 In order to compare the use of LongForm and Microcontent formats, applied for the study of the educational content, exploratory research was designed in a quantitative-qualitative approach, with the initial hypothesis that LongForm is best suited for use in most complex educational content. The research aimed to compare the experiences of using the two models, the participants’ behavior and, consequently, to identify the adequacy and the inadequacy of each format for complex content.

Courseware in LongForm and Microcontent formats respectively referred to as Model 1 and Model 2, were elaborated addressing the same content and these materials were used as study activities in an undergraduate discipline offered in the hybrid course[1]. The research took place in eight undergraduate courses at a private university located in Minas Gerais state of Brazil that has, besides its headquarters, four other campuses in cities of the same state.

The educational material denominated Model 1 has used several resources, so-called multimedia elements, to compose the content about water subject, that the students would have to dominate. The items found in a journalistic article published on the Internet by a Folha de São Paulo newspaper were inserted in the material, which were the textual elements of differentiated fonts that contained various sizes of letters and subtitles, images highlighted by their size, colors and galleries, infographics, information boxes, and video (Figure 1). Authorization to use the journalistic article website was granted by the newspaper research department.

Figure 1 – Longform used in Model 1 educational material[2].

In turn, Model 2, followed all the characteristics of Microcontent, offered the students a page with five links, a list of short news, combined together, which overall approached the same themes of Model 1 with great similarity, but independent of each other. The following contents was organized in Model 2:

  1. a) A distribuição da água no mundo – Mundo Educação site[3].
  2. b) Brasil e as mudanças climáticas – WWF site[4].
  3. c) Reservatório da Cantareira atinge menor nível em 39 anos –Folha de São Paulo journal[5].
  4. d) Clima urbano: Grandes cidades são ilhas de calor – – Universo OnLine portal[6].

By offering these links, which were organized on a single Home Page that has hinted that all addresses should be visited, the individual participation of each student has occurred.

Microcontent, when used for educational purposes, especially in more complex content, was considered a very demanding process for students, making them active, explorers, collaborative, attentive readers, and smart digital navigators, in order to search within the various Microcontents that address the same theme, which are complements to their studies.

This research had like participants those students enrolled in the course that authorized the use of their personal and browsing data while reading for data collection, and who have answered the following question: “When you be studying, your actions on this page will be monitored for academic research, do you agree?”. This question has appeared on the screen via a pop-up message in the first access to the course. Thus, with these authorizations, individual data regarding utilization, preference, and navigation were automatically collected by Bots[7] inserted in the teaching material pages of those students.

However, data from students enrolled in the course, but who were not performing the assessment activities within the time frame provided in the institution’s Academic Calendar were excluded from the research, and also the data from those who have not wished to be part of the study or those which have not authorized by clicking on “Disagree” in the authorization message.

In the quantitative step, the bots collected the following: (a) from Model 1 – LongForm: data regarding reading time, media items on which the student clicked – such as image gallery, video, next page access button – and video retention time; (b) Model 2 – Microcontent: data for the five links the student clicked, in other words, if he clicked more than one link or all of them. The objective was to identify, in the first model, if the student explored all the resources offered and, in the second model, if the student was interested in exploring one of the available links or if one item of news information was enough.

In the qualitative step, whose data were obtained through descriptive answers to questions presented to the student after the end of the activity, it was possible to identify the utilization perception of students on the experience of using the models.

The analysis of quantitative data was performed using descriptive statistics and qualitative data were analyzed by the content, inspired by Bardin (2010), with a categorization of approximations and distances in both formats, the LongForm and the Microcontent.

Of the 488 students enrolled in the surveyed courses, 67 students agreed to participate in the survey, which represented 13.72% of the total. Greater accession was expected, but the nearly 70 participants formed a heterogeneous group, through which it was possible to identify different perceptions of use regarding the offered materials. Of the 67 participants, 19 students used Model 1 – the LongForm, and 45 students used Model 2 – the Microcontent, and three agreed to participate, but they did not respond to the activity, giving up their participation in the survey.

 

Microcontent and Longform: each format has its purpose

Considering of the limits that are necessary to concise a paper published in a journal, the discussion presented in this section has been focus on the main differences found between the LongForm and Microcontent formats based on statistical results and content analysis of the participants responses. The responses to the questionnaire were quantified and categorized based on perceptions of difficulties or facilities encountered during the tasks proposed in Models 1 or 2.

In Model 1 (LongForm) the answers were grouped into the assumptions described below.

Negative aspects:

  • Extensive and tiring teaching material.
  • Long and confusing text.
  • Difficult to understand what was requested.

Positive aspects:

  • No difficulty in performing tasks;
  • Clear text, objective and audiovisual resources that assist;
  • Reading holds attention.

 

In Model 2 (Microcontent), the assumptions resulting from the groupings of responses were as follows.

Negative aspects:

  • Short time available to access all links;
  • Extensive task.
  • Difficult to understand what was requested.
  • Many important items within one didactic material with several links.
  • Teacher support was lacking.

Positive aspects:

  • Access to the content of the links helped in the study.
  • Although restricted, the content offered was sufficient.
  • Simple task;
  • Didactic material very simple and clear.

Regardless of the format used (Model 1 or 2), it was observed that biggest challenge to study was the digital reading ability of each student. Mastering technologies to the point of using them as a facilitating tool in the knowledge construction is an individual process, and a result of their own experiences and skills. Therefore, the person when is studying needs to know how to deal with these tools, to know how to access the contents and to master the languages, something that would require proactivity. It would be necessary to know the digital resources, identify and make the correct use of equipment and controls, to finally using the technologies in the learning process.

Through the research application, it was possible to realize that the biggest challenge to study and to compare didactic materials for online study is not necessarily related to the organization format, but the digital reading ability of each student. After all, mastering technologies to the point of using them as a facilitating tool in the process of building knowledge is an individual process, the result of their own experiences, skills, and competences. Regardless of whether the material that the student contacted was LongForm or Microcontent, that student would need to be able to read online.

The results bring by Model 1 – LongForm had more positive reports about didactic material. There were 58% positive responses related to the material, against 5% negative reports. Into students’ perception, reading was been easy, regardless of the equipment used to access it, considering that no restrictions were pointed out of the collected perceptions of the device, which includes usability and ergonomics.  The great difference among participants who accessed themselves desktop content and those have used mobile devices centered on the reading time: 2.09 minutes when accessing their desktops and 11.06 minutes to has been accessing others via mobile devices such as tablets and cellphones.

The content offered by the LongForm model, while addressing the same theme as the content of the compared format, was all offered in a single two-page material, resulting in complex and dense content that required concentrating and exploratory reading. As a result, participants had low access (10%) to the second page of content, which was the other half of the material. Neither the media used to access and the consequent retention time they demanded for reading, not the inadequate access to the second half of the material interfered in the grades that were obtained by students, considering that the values were either 8 or 10 points. The good quality of the answers is because the “water” theme is generally known; teachers have had the opportunity to work well through the content modules that preceded the activity and, finally, by the features themselves in the LongForm model, which was enough material for the students to answer the proposed question – by offering various multimedia elements and a good amount of textual information in its first part.

In turn, Model 2 – Microcontent – presented different perceptions about the material. There were 47% of positive reports and 15% of negative reports related by participants. Students were also able to read easily, regardless of the support used to access it, considering that none of the collected perceptions were their observations related to the device, such as usability or ergonomics. The Desktop vs. Mobile Devices relation was also centered on reading time, which was of 2.26 minutes among Desktops and of 6.45 minutes among students using tablets and mobile devices. The content was better explored by students, with a more balanced number of visits among all available links, but with a gradual decline from the first to the last.

In Model 2 – Microcontent, consisting of a page with consolidated textual information and a series of sequential links, about 30% of all the students who accessed the first link clicked on the last one, a much higher rate than that of students who opened the second page of the content from Model 1 – LongForm (10%).

The navigation paths, despite being laid out, were materialized through the reader’s action only. Many items and navigation paths have been unexplored, and this reality may be related to the lack of reading habits, digital or not. This student behavior can also be linked to each person’s particular way of structuring information so that it makes sense and becomes knowledge, and therefore it is unconsidered a problem. It is likely that once the navigation path is defined by the reader, some of the participants considered that 50% of the content read – in the case of Model 1 – LongForm; and only one, two or three of the offered links – in the case of Model 2 – Microcontent, were enough to respond the activity, adding the didactic material information to previous knowledge about the subject. Even if the students have not clicked on all available tools or if they accessed the links out of order, it just proves the primary feature of digital texts is that paths cannot be predicted, they can only be available.

By searching for an alternative for didactic material production that would not simplify the contents and that would not harm the educational process, the research identified that the Microcontent format – once it needs to fragment the information in micro-units and demands that the students read more than one unit to build a meaningful comprehension about the subject at hand – remains a viable format for educational use in digital media, especially when it comes to less dense or complex subjects, like review topics and supplemental materials.

Finally, it was confirmed that the LongForm presents itself as a viable alternative for online studying because it is constituted by a single virtual space where larger texts and varied multimedia resources can be inserted to enrich the material and to allow the teacher to offer the students all the information, resources, additional items and whatever else is needed to work on the study unit in question. The students took more time to read in the LongForm, but it is inferred that this is due to the number of elements inserted in the material that require more careful reading to understand the data.

Therefore, the use of the Microcontent format is indicated to offer online learning materials intended for revision, the initial presentation of supplemental materials such as “learn more” links and for the use in minor subjects, both in extension and conceptual deepening. And it is proposed the use of LongForm – usually found in journalistic content of major reports – in distance education, in reaching didactic materials for regular study, as complete didactic modules composed of theory, examples, exercises, illustrations, videos and activity proposals; in other words, in larger issues, both in length and in conceptual density.

  

References

Amante, L. & Morgado L. (2001) Metodologia de concepção e desenvolvimento de aplicações educativas: o caso dos materiais hipermedia. Discursos: língua, cultura e sociedade, 27-43. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10400.2/4348.

Bardin, L. (2010). Análise de conteúdo. (L. A. Reto & A. Pinheiro, Trad.). Lisboa: Edições 70.

Buchem, I., & Hamelmann, H. (2010). Microlearning: a strategy for ongoing professional development. eLearning Papers21(7), 1-15. Retrieved from: http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/ce.2015.623254.

Gabrielli, S., Kimani, S. & Catarci, T. (2017). The Design of MicroLearning Experiences: A Research Agenda (On Microlearning). Retrieved from: https://goo.gl/mB2GdY.

Longhi, R. R., & Winques, K. (2015). O lugar do longform no jornalismo online. Qualidade versus quantidade e algumas considerações sobre o consumo. Brazilian Journalism Research, 11(1), 110-127. Retrieved from: https://doi.org/10.25200/BJR.v11n1.2015.693.

Moore, M. G., & Anderson, W. G. (Eds.). (2007). Handbook of distance education. L. Erlbaum Associates.

Silva, M. D., Vieira, M. L. H., Pereira, A. T. C., & Braviano, G. Microconteúdos na forma de explainer videos para a educação. Uma revisão integrativa. Retrieved from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/297918827_MICROCONTEUDOS_NA_FORMA_DE_EXPLAINER_VIDEOS_PARA_A_EDUCACAO_UMA_REVISAO_INTEGRATIVA

Willey, D. A. (2002) Connecting learning objects to instructional design theory: A definition, a metaphor, and a taxionomy.  Retrieved from:  http://reusability.org/read/chapters/wiley.doc

[1] Hybrid course are names commonly used to describe courses in which some traditional face-to-face has been replaced by online learning activities.

 

[2] http://arte.folha.uol.com.br/ambiente/2014/09/15/crise-da-agua/

[3] http://mundoeducacao.bol.uol.com.br/geografia/a-distribuicao-agua-no-mundo.htm

[4]http://www.wwf.org.br/natureza_brasileira/reducao_de_impactos2/clima/politicas_de_clima/brasil_mudancas_climaticas/

[5] http://www1.folha.uol.com.br/cotidiano/2014/01/1405442-reservatorio-da-cantareira-atinge-menor-nivel-em-39-anos.shtml

[6] https://educacao.uol.com.br/disciplinas/geografia/clima-urbano-grandes-cidades-sao-ilhas-de-calor.htm

[7] Bots are autonomous program on a network (especially the Internet) that can interact with computer systems or users.

 


[1]  RED – Revista de Educación a Distancia, haciéndose eco de la urgencia educativa que supone el COVID19 y la transición abrupta de la educación convencional a la educación en línea  entiende que, al igual que ha sucedido con la investigación biomédica, la investigación educativa debe propiciar elementos de conocimiento y de práctica que sean útiles en esta situación a los docentes, a los diseñadores de la educación y a otros investigadores.
Igualmente debe difundir los resultados que se produzcan en el mismo momento en que se produzcan.
Por eso además de convocar un número extraordinario, con este único tema, ofrecemos este blog académico para publicar resultados en progreso sin revisión de pares, sólo con la revisión editorial.

La convocatoria de RED la pueden encontrar en español e inglés en estas direcciones:

https://revistas.um.es/red/announcement

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159). Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria. Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York. Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

University teachers coping with a challenging situation – The transition from conventional teaching to online teaching: Organizational and pedagogical issues

 

 

 

RED Distance Education Journal. Preprints of the special issue «Transition from conventional education to online education and learning, as a consequence of COVID19» [1] 

Gabriel Horenczyk and  Marcelo I. Dorfsman. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

We plan to conduct an educational study in an unusual situation in Israel and in many countries of the world, where universities are forced to switch from conventional (face-to-face) teaching to online teaching overnight.

In the early days of the transition, the feeling is of mobilization and the concerns of most professors, and a great desire to understand the technological tools, some completely new and some familiar (at least some as Moodle) to adapt their teaching to the new environment.

The issues we will address in the research are:

A. Impact of online teaching on the lecturer’s practice during the lock period:

  • Does the online environment cause the lecturer to change the teaching method?
  • Can the lecturer utilize the tools offered to him to innovate the teaching method?
  • Is he just trying to continue the previous method with new tools?

B. Changes in lecturers’ perceptions throughout the semester (or the period this method will last):

  • What are the lecturers’ perceptions of teaching supported by technology tools in general, especially through online teaching?
  • Given that the lecturers did not «choose» to go online, at the end of the period, did these perceptions change?
  • How have they changed? Will the lecturers choose / want to use technology and online teaching tools after the lock period and return to normal?
  • Will the «forced» practice somehow affect his general practice?

C. Best Practices Throughout the study, we can ask certain lecturers to talk about certain lessons that are best practices for them. We can watch the recordings of the lessons or participate as observers in some live lessons.

An analysis of these practices will enrich our pedagogical knowledge of university teaching. We will ask ourselves why constitute best practices, what is the pedagogical innovation of these practices, and to what extent they are affected and – or are the result of the use of tools and a specialized pedagogical-technological environment.

  1. Online lecturer typology: Various lecturers’ responses to the new reality can already be identified today: 1. In agreement and even «submission»; 2. some lecturers see this situation as a challenge and try to teach and offer innovative teaching to students; 3. and others just think of transferring their methods to a new environment if possible and they also say they don’t think this kind of teaching is «the real thing»

From analyzing questionnaires + in-depth interviews and observations, we will try to identify different types of lecturers as they deal with the pedagogical transition, their and  answer to the situation, which will serve as the  basis for analysis.

The study will include quantitative tools (questionnaires to be distributed to all lecturers at the Hebrew University) + in-depth interviews, online lesson observation and an analysis of the Moodle platform of the online courses. This analysis will give us information on both synchronous and asynchronous tools that the lecturers use.

Prof. Gabriel Horenczyk – gabriel.horenczyk@mail.huji.ac.il

Dr. Marcelo I. Dorfsman  – marcelo.dorfsman@mail.huji.ac.il

 


[1]  Call for contributions for special issue

Transition from mainstream education to online education and learning, as a result of the  COVID-19 pandemic

Deadline to send manuscripts: October 15, 2020

Estimated date for publication: March / April 2021.

Publication norms and guidelines for authors http://www.um.es/ead/red/normasRED.htm#_Toc481505686

Presentation and justification. –

As a result of the COVID19 pandemic, in all affected countries, facilities and educational centers have been closed at all levels, and face-to-face teaching activity has been suspended in any of its forms.

Authorities have instructed that online activities be offered as an alternative. This has given rise to a great diversity of options and real situations. We believe that its evolution and outcome can condition the future of education, of states and societies, it can also change the professional and vital perspectives of several generations of individuals.

In Education an emergency situation of a colossal entity has been created. Similar to what happens in Health, in Health Sciences and Life Sciences research.

This urgency alone justifies the need to investigate the consequences of what is happening, so that results can be obtained on the fly that can serve other researchers. Also to serve educational systems to guide their decisions.

We need therefore that all ongoing and future experiencies in this emergency transition to online learning context resulting from the COVID-19 situation, have dissemination channel similar to that of medical or biomedical investigations.

For this purpose, the RED journal has undertaken two initiatives:

  1. To launch a call for a special issue in order to collect empirical research that is being developed. Mainly, the one studying changes introduced in the teaching methodology, instructional design, learning evaluation as a result of the transition from conventional education to online teaching and learning due to the COVID-19 crisis, at all levels.
  2. Dedicate the RED academic blog to post articles preprints for RED. Posts will have only editorial review. The themes will be the same as those indicated in the previous point.

The RED journal has become a clear reference on these topics among not only the publications published in the Spanish-speaking world, but in the general international context as well.

It is important that RED responds to this challenge by providing a monographic issue thatdisseminates the research and experiences that are taking place.

As in previous RED issues, the articles accepted should be of the the following types:

  • development and testing of one or more particular learning technologies or affordances
  • case studies of practices
  • critical annalysis of politics or research
  • longitudinal studies
  • empirical experiments
  • critical review of the literature produced around the educational transition by COVID19

For this issue we have the special collaboration of Dr. Antonio Moreira Teixeira, as invited International Editor.

Dr. Moreira Teixeira has a unique career as an author and expert researcher, Head of the Department of Education and Distance Learning at the Open University of Portugal and former President of the European Distance and E-learning Network (EDEN), from 2013 to 2016.

We call your attentio to the fact that RED, a Journal of Distance Education, is included in the ESCI index of the Web of Science, its work is included in the WoS Core Collection, as well as in Scopus and it has the FECYT quality certificate. It is also indexed in practically all specialized scientific repositories. Therefore, it has a commitment to additional quality, which is already characteristic in a traditional way.

Consequently, the review will be especially thorough in the research methodologies used and in the detection of non-scientific or para-scientific elements. RED does not consider self-report studies as a research method.

The works must comply with the rules on format, style, citation, ethics and plagiarism that can be found in

http://www.um.es/ead/red/normasRED.htm#_Toc481505686, and will be evaluated with the procedure and deadlines that are also described in

http://www.um.es/ead/red/normasRED.htm.

The website to present the originals is https://revistas.um.es/red/index

Yours faithfull on behalf of RED editorial boards

https://revistas.um.es/red/announcement

https://www.um.es/ead/red/call65_english.pdf

Hypoteses RED preprints should be sent to mzapata@um.es

 

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159). Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria. Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York. Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

Análisis de las competencias didácticas virtuales en la impartición de clases universitarias en línea, durante contingencia del COVID-19

 

 

 

 

 

Preprints del número especial de RED Revista de Educación a Distancia «Transición de la educación convencional a la educación y al aprendizaje en línea, como consecuencia del COVID19» [1]

Arturo Amaya Amaya, Daniel Cantú Cervantes y José Guillermo Marreros Vázquez, de la Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas. México

Desde hace aproximadamente una década en México, se ha venido reflexionando sobre la importancia de la flexibilidad curricular de programas educativos presenciales de nivel pregrado, así como la importancia de diversificar las opciones de enseñanza y aprendizaje a través de medios digitales, con la intención de brindar respuesta a los problemas de deserción, cobertura e inclusión escolar; desafíos que hasta la fecha se siguen presentando, principalmente en la educación superior. Algunas Instituciones de Educación Superior (IES) han atendido estas recomendaciones con la implementación de programas de capacitación docente, sin una intervención tecnológica verdadera, donde los profesores puedan poner a prueba sus competencias académicas-tecnológicas adquiridas para apoyar sus sesiones de clases presenciales con la incorporación de Tecnologías para el Aprendizaje y el Conocimiento (TAC).

En estos momentos de cuarentena sanitaria derivada de la pandemia del COVID-19, ha obligado a las IES a transitar de manera obligada hacia los medios digitales, comprometiendo la calidad de la enseñanza, principalmente porque son muy pocas las universidades que han atendido las recomendaciones de la UNESCO, ANUIES y SEP relacionadas principalmente con la adopción de las TAC, así como la inversión en la formación y especialización de profesores para el desarrollo de competencias académicas-tecnológicas.

Es decir, en estos momentos miles de profesores universitarios están poniendo a prueba sus competencias digitales básicas, intermedias o avanzadas; y algunos otros únicamente su creatividad para preparar sus sesiones de clases, contenidos, ejercicios y exámenes, apoyándose en plataformas tecnológicas disponibles en la nube, sin estar seguros que están utilizando la mejor opción para atender en primer lugar, las demandas educativas de sus estudiantes y en segundo lugar, las exigencias de la IES para el cumplimiento de los programas de estudios de sus asignaturas.

El artículo propuesto es un estudio cuantitativo con diseño transeccional descriptivo con el objetivo de analizar las competencias didácticas virtuales con base en una metodología soportada en el modelo T-PACK que se muestra en la figura 2, que mayormente fueron desarrolladas por los docentes (N=87, Edad: M=33.91, DE=7.699, Max=51, Min=20)  de la Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas (UAT) que cursaron el Diplomado en Ambientes Virtuales de Aprendizaje del 2014 al 2019 e impartieron clases en línea durante contingencia del COVID-19 en el periodo comprendido de marzo a abril del año 2020.

Figura 2. El modelo TPACK

Fuente: Shulman (1986); Koehler & Mishra (2009)

Con base en lo anterior, se diseño la siguiente pregunta de investigación ¿Cuál es el nivel de logro que muestran los profesores que cursaron el Diplomado en Ambientes Virtuales de Aprendizaje del 2014 al 2019 en la Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, en relación con el modelo de competencias tecnologías y pedagógicas T-PACK durante la cátedra a distancia llevada a cabo en la contingencia del COVID-19?

De la cual se formularon las siguientes hipótesis:

H1: Los profesores que cursaron el Diplomado en Ambientes Virtuales de Aprendizaje del 2014 al 2019 en la Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, muestran competencias sobresalientes en el modelo T-PACK en su cátedra a distancia durante la contingencia del COVID-19.

H0: Los profesores que cursaron el Diplomado en Ambientes Virtuales de Aprendizaje del 2014 al 2019 en la Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, muestran competencias buenas o regulares en el modelo T-PACK en su cátedra a distancia durante la contingencia del COVID-19.

Ha: Los profesores que cursaron el Diplomado en Ambientes Virtuales de Aprendizaje del 2014 al 2019 en la Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, muestran competencias deficientes en el modelo T-PACK en su cátedra a distancia durante la contingencia del COVID-19.

H2: Los docentes varones y mujeres que cursaron el Diplomado en Ambientes Virtuales de Aprendizaje del 2014 al 2019 en la Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, muestran diferencias significativas entre sí, respecto a las dimensiones del modelo T-PACK en su cátedra a distancia durante la contingencia del COVID-19.

Ho2: Los docentes varones y mujeres que cursaron el Diplomado en Ambientes Virtuales de Aprendizaje del 2014 al 2019 en la Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, no muestran diferencias significativas entre sí, respecto a las dimensiones del modelo T-PACK en su cátedra a distancia durante la contingencia del COVID-19.

Los resultados muestran que los docentes presentaron competencias sobresalientes en su cátedra a distancia durante la contingencia, y además, no se encontraron diferencias significativas (p>0.05) entre el logro de los docentes varones (N=51, Edad: M=35.84, DE=7.298, Max=50, Min=20) y mujeres (N=36, Edad: M=29.33, DE=4.980, Max=49, Min=20) en ninguna de las dimensiones del modelo T-PACK.

Como conclusiones la Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, al igual que todas las universidades del mundo tuvieron que transitar de manera vertiginosa de la educación presencial a la educación en línea, adaptando sus sesiones de clases presenciales a un formato virtual para poder atender a los estudiantes durante la contingencia de la pandemia del virus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19). Este estudio tuvo como fin analizar las habilidades y competencias didácticas virtuales del modelo T-PACK (Shulman, 1986; Koehler y Mishra, 2009), que mayormente fueron desarrolladas por los docentes que cursaron el Diplomado en Ambientes Virtuales de Aprendizaje del 2014 al 2019 e impartieron clases en línea durante contingencia del COVID-19 en el periodo comprendido de marzo a abril del año 2020. En este sentido, se logró aportar evidencia que respaldó la H1 que dictó: Los profesores que cursaron el Diplomado en Ambientes Virtuales de Aprendizaje del 2014 al 2019 en la Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, muestran competencias sobresalientes en el modelo T-PACK en su cátedra a distancia durante la contingencia del COVID-19. Dando respuesta a la pregunta de investigación que estipuló: ¿Cuál es el nivel de logro que muestran los profesores que cursaron el Diplomado en Ambientes Virtuales de Aprendizaje del 2014 al 2019 en la Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, en relación con el modelo de competencias tecnologías y pedagógicas T-PACK durante la cátedra a distancia llevada a cabo en la contingencia del COVID-19? Además de lo visto, no se encontraron diferencias significativas (p>0.05) entre el género de los profesores que cursaron el Diplomado en Ambientes Virtuales de Aprendizaje del 2014 al 2019 en la Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, en ninguna de las dimensiones del modelo T-PACK.

El aprendizaje que deja la pandemia del COVID-19 a las universidades, es valorar el quehacer académico de los profesores e invertir en el desarrollo de sus competencias digitales, porque seguramente la educación superior cambiara no únicamente en México, sino en toda Latinoamérica, donde la educación multimodal y/o educación a distancia tendrán un papel preponderante para el desarrollo disciplinar y profesional de las futuras generaciones de discentes.

Arturo, Amaya Amaya, arturo.amaya@docentes.uat.edu.mx
Daniel Cantú Cervantes, dcantu@docentes.uat.edu.mx
José Guillermo Marreros Vázquez, jgmarreros@docentes.uat.edu.mx


[1]  RED – Revista de Educación a Distancia, haciéndose eco de la urgencia educativa que supone el COVID19 y la transición abrupta de la educación convencional a la educación en línea  entiende que, al igual que ha sucedido con la investigación biomédica, la investigación educativa debe propiciar elementos de conocimiento y de práctica que sean útiles en esta situación a los docentes, a los diseñadores de la educación y a otros investigadores.
Igualmente debe difundir los resultados que se produzcan en el mismo momento en que se produzcan.
Por eso además de convocar un número extraordinario, con este único tema, ofrecemos este blog académico para publicar resultados en progreso sin revisión de pares, sólo con la revisión editorial.

La convocatoria de RED la pueden encontrar en español e inglés en estas direcciones:

https://revistas.um.es/red/announcement

https://www.um.es/ead/red/call65.pdf

https://www.um.es/ead/red/call65_english.pdf

El envío de preprints para RED de Hypoteses deben enviarlos a mzapata@um.es

La publicación de este preprint sólo supone una revisión editorial previa. No influye ni favorablemente ni desfavorablemente la publicación definitiva del artículo en RED, que está condicionada por la revisión de pares por el método de «par ciego simple».

 

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159). Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria. Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York. Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

Docentes universitarios “bajo presión”: la transición (forzada) de la enseñanza convencional a la enseñanza en línea – cuestiones pedagógicas y organizacionales.

 

Preprints del número especial de RED Revista de Educación a Distancia «Transición de la educación convencional a la educación y al aprendizaje en línea, como consecuencia del COVID19» [1]

 

Gabriel Horenczyk y  Marcelo I. Dorfsman. Universidad Hebrea de Jerusalén.

El jueves 5 de marzo pasado, los docentes de la Universidad Hebrea de Jerusalem recibimos una comunicación del rectorado informando que – dada la situación de emergencia que se vivía en el país – la universidad había decidido postergar el inicio del segundo semestre del 15 al 22 de marzo. Las clases se reiniciarían totalmente a distancia. En la semana del 15.3, los docentes, sus departamentos y unidades académicas debían tomar los recaudos para iniciar las clases la semana siguiente, online.

Situaciones similares se dieron en todos los institutos universitarios del país, y posiblemente del mundo.

Nuestra universidad, a diferencia de otras, no tiene experiencia en enseñanza online. Existe solamente una Maestría en modalidad Blended Learning, en el área de educación; y no más de 15 cursos académicos online en toda la universidad (además de algunos Mooc´s, no académicos).

Un grupo de investigadores de la Escuela de Educación, junto con colegas de universidades de Suiza, Alemania, Argentina y EEUU, comenzamos a trabajar en un proyecto que tiene como foco al docente y su práctica pedagógica.

A diferencia de otros proyectos, que se focalizan en los aspectos psicológicos, sociológicos, políticos y económicos derivados de la situación bajo la pandemia, en esta investigación nos hemos focalizado en la práctica pedagógica del docente universitario y en la relación entre esta práctica y su contexto institucional.

La pregunta principal de la investigación es:  

¿De qué manera, el paso de la enseñanza convencional a la enseñanza online ha impactado – o no – en la práctica pedagógica del docente universitario?

Nuestros objetivos son:

  • Comprender de qué manera el paso “forzado” a la enseñanza online, impacta en la práctica pedagógica del docente.
  • Analizar el vínculo entre las percepciones docentes acerca de su práctica y el contexto institucional
  • Prever la posibilidad de cambios en la práctica pedagógica del docente luego de la crisis, a fin de contribuir a la inclusión de prácticas innovadoras.

La investigación integrará la metodología cuantitativa y la cualitativa. En una primera etapa, un cuestionario consensuado entre los investigadores, será suministrado a una muestra de por lo menos 200 docentes en cada una de las universidades participantes. En la encuesta, y como continuación de la investigación, los docentes serán invitados a participar de “focus groups” y de entrevistas en profundidad, con las cuales podremos completar nuestra etapa de recolección de información.

El análisis de los datos se iniciará tomando en cuenta los siguientes temas que hoy nos preocupan:

A. Impacto de la enseñanza en línea en la práctica del docente universitario durante el período de aislamiento:

  • ¿En qué medida el entorno induce al docente universitario a cambiar sus métodos de enseñanza?
  • ¿En qué medida el docente universitario está capacitado para aprovechar las herramientas que se le ofrecen e innovar sus métodos de enseñanza?
  • ¿En qué medida el docente universitario trata de aplicar métodos conocidos, en entornos desconocidos?

B. Cambios en las percepciones de los profesores a lo largo del semestre (o el período que durará la utilización forzada de la enseñanza online):

  • ¿Cuáles son las percepciones de los profesores sobre la enseñanza respaldada por herramientas tecnológicas en general, especialmente a través de la enseñanza en línea?
  • Dado que los profesores no «eligieron» utilizar herramientas tecnológicas; al final del período, ¿cambiaron estas percepciones?
  • ¿Cómo han cambiado? ¿Los profesores elegirán / querrán usar tecnología y herramientas de enseñanza en línea después del período de aislamientos y vuelta a la normalidad?
  • ¿La práctica «forzada» afectará de alguna manera su práctica pedagógica posterior?

 

C. Buenas prácticas: A lo largo del estudio, solicitaremos a algunos docentes que relaten clases que son consideradas por ellos como buenas prácticas. Podremos observar también las grabaciones de esas clases o bien participar como observadores en algunas de ellas.

Un análisis de estas prácticas enriquecerá nuestro conocimiento pedagógico de la enseñanza universitaria. Nos preguntaremos por qué constituyen “buenas prácticas”, cuál es su innovación pedagógica, y en qué medida se ven afectadas y – o son el resultado del uso de herramientas y un entorno pedagógico-tecnológico específico.

D. Tipología de los docentes en línea: Antes de comenzar la investigación, somos testigos de diferentes respuestas de docentes a esta nueva realidad: 1. Acuerdo e incluso «sumisión»; 2. Desafío e intento de ofrecer alternativas innovadoras a los estudiantes; 3. Transferir viejos métodos a un nuevo entorno. Hay quienes además, sostienen que este tipo de enseñanza no es «lo real». El diseño de una tipología docente contribuirá a la comprensión profunda de las prácticas y también, al diseño de prácticas de formación del profesorado.

Seguramente, y dado que el diseño de esta investigación es formativo, nuevas preguntas y cuestiones surgirán surgirá a lo largo de la misma – en especial en su fase cualitativa.  Confiamos en que los resultados de la misma puedan contribuir a la mejora de la práctica pedagógica universitaria, así como a una buena adecuación de los contextos institucionales a situaciones de emergencia.

Prof. Gabriel Horenczyk – gabriel.horenczyk@mail.huji.ac.il

Dr. Marcelo I. Dorfsman  – marcelo.dorfsman@mail.huji.ac.il

 

Nota: aquellas universidades que estén interesadas en sumarse a esta investigación, utilizando las herramientas construidas por nuestro equipo, están invitadas a dirigirse a nosotros por correo para coordinar acciones.


[1]  RED – Revista de Educación a Distancia, haciéndose eco de la urgencia educativa que supone el COVID19 y la transición abrupta de la educación convencional a la educación en línea  entiende que, al igual que ha sucedido con la investigación biomédica, la investigación educativa debe propiciar elementos de conocimiento y de práctica que sean útiles en esta situación a los docentes, a los diseñadores de la educación y a otros investigadores.
Igualmente debe difundir los resultados que se produzcan en el mismo momento en que se produzcan.
Por eso además de convocar un número extraordinario, con este único tema, ofrecemos este blog académico para publicar resultados en progreso sin revisión de pares, sólo con la revisión editorial.

La convocatoria de RED la pueden encontrar en español e inglés en estas direcciones:

https://revistas.um.es/red/announcement

https://www.um.es/ead/red/call65.pdf

https://www.um.es/ead/red/call65_english.pdf

El envío de preprints para RED de Hypoteses deben enviarlos a mzapata@um.es

La publicación de este preprint sólo supone una revisión editorial previa. No influye ni favorablemente ni desfavorablemente la publicación definitiva del artículo en RED, que está condicionada por la revisión de pares por el método de «par ciego simple».

Con este propósito empezamos a publicar la nota en la que comunican el comienzo de una investigación desde la Universidad de Jerusalem los investigadores del Instituto Melton Gabriel Horenczyk y Marcelo I. Dorfsman

 

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159). Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria. Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York. Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

Computational thinking predictable trends and desirable trends

Computational thinking cannot avoid trends that are otherwise marked for technology-supported education. However, there is a margin of variability. Next, we comment experiences of the authors and their commitment to the theoretical corpus of learning and instructional design make them conceive, within that margin, as more favorable trends for more effective learning within the field of social performance and personal development of individuals:

 

A. Learning ecologies of computational thinking.

Under this denominator various trends are grouped with a common factor: the premise that the context in which learning takes place has an enormous influence on students and their educational development. It is explained in The Ecology of Learning. Several Streams of Research Take a Broad Approach to Understanding the Learning Process and in Media ecology: An interdisciplinary approach to the study of communication by Breslow (2001 and 1986) and Nystrom (1973). This perspective is not new, now the difference is that it is structured in its approach and takes on a new meaning with the technological learning environments, particularly important now in the computational thinking environments as a cohesive element and interaction of the components that constitute it.

The theoretical construct has its roots in the production of seminal thinkers such as John Dewey, Jean Piaget, Lev Semenovich Vgotsky and Kurt Lewin; and it implies powerful news about how teaching is handled and learning is achieved when it transcends the individual, in its origin, as a cause of its formation, in its projection and in its interactive nature. There we include pedagogical perspectives such as context development and situated learning. To these contributions must be added those of Paper and recently those of Grover (2018) that we have found. But what will be the characteristics of these particular ecologies. It is something that remains to be determined by practice and research.


B. Computational thinking presents a challenge that can be pointed out as the most important.

That is the inclusiveness of all kinds. Its new frontier is Adaptive Artificial Intelligence and recommendation algorithms. In this regard and with learning ecologies, a version of artificial intelligence that has to do with intelligent learning environments (considered these as an evolution of adaptive environments and context-sensitive environments) and with recommendation algorithms.


C. Computational thinking as literacy and key competence.

Ephemerally computational thinking will have a strong validity considered as early learning of programming, of coding. But every time they will impose computational thinking modalities that will make sense as a new literacy in a new culture and as a key competence, in the sense that we have described elsewhere, in the line that Grover (2018) and Zapata-Ros (2015) advocate for now: As an accumulation of various related skills because of the meaning attributed to them being useful to this type of thinking, which serves to do things and work. Other collateral or basic initiatives will also come, such as unpplugged, educational robotics or the development of algorithm skills close to AI. But always aimed at developing a computational thinking of these characteristics.

 

D. In general, the differences between superficial learning and deep learning will be more marked.

In relation to what was commented in the previous section, this characteristic will particularly affect learning in environments of computational thinking, robotics, artificial intelligence, etc. In the Knowledge Society, in a first stage of the Internet and networks, a notable feature of its development has been a boom of banality and relevance. Myths, including educational ones, have proliferated in the network and have affect educational and research institutions, contaminating them in different ways. One in the application of supposed educational principles and procedures derived from it, and another in the nature of the contents themselves.

Traditionally, the difference between what they call «deep» and «superficial» learning is based on the fact that deep learning is accepted as learning that goes beyond memorization and reaches a more complete understanding of concepts and ideas, the results of the fundamental decisions that instructors make about how their courses will work (for example, the type of homework and exams that they plan). But currently the border is not only in purely memoristic assimilation, or even in a weak or linear understanding, as opposed to the authentic acquisition of knowledge, which entails attribution of meaning and execution with autonomy of what has been learned, but also encompasses the critical sense, the discernment between the consistent and logical of what is not or the metacognition. It is not only an application to humans of a concept, deep learning, which was defined thinking about machines, but a way of learning that goes beyond memorization and the application of trivial patterns in learning.

 

This post is included in an article of RED Distance Education Magazine. It should be cited as: 

Avello-Martínez, R., Lavonen, J. y Zapata, M. (2020). Coding and educational robotics and their relationship with computational and creative thinking. A compressive review. RED. Revista Educación a Distancia, 62. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/red/6

References

Breslow, L. (1986). Media ecology: An interdisciplinary approach to the study of communication. Paper presented at the Association for Integrative Studies Conference, Bowling Green, Ohio

Breslow, L. (2001). The Ecology of Learning Several Streams of Research Take a Broad Approach to Understanding the Learning Process. http://web.mit.edu/fnl/vol/142/breslow.htm

Grover, S. & Pea, R. (2013). Computational Thinking in K–12 A Review of the State of the Field. Educational Researcher. 42. doi:10.3102/0013189×12463051

Grover, S. (2018, March 13). The 5th ‘C’ of 21st century skills? Try computational thinking (not coding. Retrieved from EdSurge News: https://edtechbooks.org/-Pz

Nystrom, C. (1973). Towards a science of media ecology: The formulation of integrated conceptual paradigms for the study of human communication systems. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, New York University

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, 46. Retrieved from http://www.um.es/ead/red/46/zapata.pdf

Zapata-Ros, M. (2019). Pensamiento computacional desenchufado. Education in the knowled

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159). Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria. Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York. Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

Algunas referencias y comentarios sobre la codificación y la robótica educativa y su relación con el pensamiento computacional y creativo

Raidell Avello

Universidad de Cienfuegos, CUBA

Coordinador de edición de RED

 

 

Jari Lavonen

Director del Programa Nacional de Reforma Educativa para Maestros.

Universidad de Helsinki, FINLANDIA

Miguel Zapata-Ros

Universidad de Murcia, ESPAÑA

Editor de RED

Instituto interuniversitario de Economía Internacional

ISSN 2386-8562

Este artículo está bajo una licencia de Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0

Debe ser citado como

Avello, R. et al (2019) Algunas referencias y comentarios sobre la codificación y la robótica educativa y su relación con el pensamiento computacional y creativo. Blog RED de Hypotheses. El aprendizaje en la Sociedad del Conocimiento.  https://red.hypotheses.org/1991

 

La velocidad del cambio en nuestra sociedad se ha acelerado desde el nacimiento de Internet y se acelerará rápidamente mediante la implementación de las innovaciones de inteligencia artificial (IA), por ejemplo, en salud y atención social, en el transporte y en la educación, así como en el análisis de aprendizaje. Nuevas herramientas tecnológicas, servicios basados ​​en tecnología y soporte se están introduciendo en nuestra vida diaria más rápido que nunca. Entre estos avances tecnológicos, especialmente AI, la tecnología robótica ha aumentado drásticamente en los últimos años. Los titulares de noticias de las principales fuentes de noticias, incluidos el New York Times, CNN, Wall Street Journal y BBC, frecuentemente presentan varias innovaciones robóticas, lo cual es un fuerte indicio de este fenómeno (Yiannoutsou, 2017).

Se ha debatido en todo el mundo sobre la necesidad de competencias en sociedades que cambian rápidamente (Zapata, 2015) y estas competencias se han denominado habilidades / competencias del siglo XXI o competencias genéricas/transversales. Estas competencias del siglo XXI describen la amplia gama de competencias necesarias para participar plenamente en las sociedades modernas y apoyar la empleabilidad de los ciudadanos. Sin embargo, hay varias definiciones y connotaciones relacionadas con estas competencias. Por ejemplo, la UNESCO (Cinco pilares) enfatiza en la definición del aprendizaje y la educación para el desarrollo sostenible.

En la descripción de UNESCO Universal Learning, analizan qué el aprendizaje es importante para todos los niños y jóvenes para el siglo XXI y para una vida digna. La OCDE (DeSeCo) analiza las habilidades, que satisfacen demandas complejas, mediante la movilización de recursos psicosociales en diferentes contextos. La UE (aprendizaje permanente, 8 competencias clave) analiza las competencias (conocimientos, habilidades y actitudes) necesarias para la realización personal, la ciudadanía activa, la inclusión social y el empleo (Voogt y Roblin, 2012). Por ejemplo, según DeSeCo (OCDE, 2005), las personas en el siglo XXI deben poder utilizar una amplia gama de herramientas, incluidas las socioculturales (lingüísticas) y digitales (tecnológicas), para interactuar eficazmente con el medio ambiente, comprometerse e interactuar en un grupo heterogéneo, realizar un trabajo orientado a la investigación y la resolución de problemas, asumir la responsabilidad de administrar sus propias vidas y actuar de forma autónoma. En este entorno, tanto el pensamiento crítico, incluido el computacional como el creativo son necesarios para aprender estas competencias.

Particular importancia tiene en este contexto lo que se ha denominado pensamiento computacional desenchufado (Unplugged computational thinking), que Zapata-Ros (2019) hace referencia al conjunto de actividades y su diseño educativo, que se elaboran para fomentar en los niños, en las primeras etapas de desarrollo cognitivo (educación infantil, primer tramo de la educación primaria, juegos en casa con los padres y los amigos, etc.), habilidades que luego pueden ser evocadas para favorecer y potenciar un buen aprendizaje del pensamiento computacional en otras etapas o en la formación técnica, profesional o en la universitaria incluso. Actividades que se suelen hacer con fichas, cartulinas, juegos de salón o de patio, juguetes mecánicos, etc. Y que se ha incorporado en los currículos oficiales de algunos países como Singapur y Hong Kong.

La característica de la resolución de problemas, como construir un robot o elaborar un código, es un proceso que consta de diferentes pasos (por ejemplo, formulación del problema – evaluación de las ideas – elección de la solución – prueba y evaluación). En este proceso se necesita un pensamiento crítico, creativo y computacional. En general, el pensamiento crítico es el análisis de hechos para formar un juicio. Sin embargo, existen diversos tipos y situaciones para el pensamiento crítico y existen varias definiciones diferentes, que generalmente incluyen el análisis racional, escéptico, imparcial o la evaluación de la evidencia objetiva. Y la creatividad es la comprensión como un proceso relacionado con el contexto para generar o reconocer ideas, alternativas o posibilidades para resolver problemas individualmente o en colaboración con otros, y puede ser considerado como original, valioso y útil por un grupo de referencia.

En este sentido, se necesita un pensamiento creativo al generar y jugar con ideas inusuales y radicales relacionadas con el problema o el diseño. El pensamiento creativo puede ser estimulado tanto por un proceso no estructurado como la lluvia de ideas, como por un proceso estructurado como el pensamiento lateral (Fisher, 2005). Por otro lado, el pensamiento computacional es necesario para resolver problemas en el contexto del diseño de un código o robot. Es necesario para diseñar algoritmos que hagan que las computadoras realicen trabajos y para explicar e interpretar el mundo como un complejo de procesos de información. Las características del pensamiento computacional son la descomposición, el reconocimiento de patrones o la representación de datos, la generalización o la abstracción y los algoritmos (Grover y Pea, 2013).

El pensamiento computacional ha ganado gran atención en el campo de la educación en los últimos años, especialmente después del lanzamiento de la Hora del Código en diciembre de 2013 en los EE. UU. E Inglaterra implementó su educación en computación en 2014 (García-Valcárcel, y Caballero-González, 2019). En un artículo seminal sobre pensamiento computacional de Jeannette Wing en 2006, predijo que el pensamiento computacional sería una habilidad fundamental utilizada por todos en el mundo a mediados del siglo XXI (Wing 2006). En términos generales, pensamiento computacional consiste en la resolución de problemas utilizando conceptos básicos, procedimientos y desarrollo de programas y algoritmos en informática, y puede ayudar a desarrollar como: creatividad, resolución de problemas, pensamiento abstracto, recursividad, iteración, métodos colaborativos, patrones, entre otros.

No obstante existe un planteamiento más holístico acerca de lo que es el pensamiento computacional. Este se refiere al conjunto de habilidades y otros elementos de desarrollo cognitivo y procedimental que podemos encontrar en las habilidades que sirven a los programadores para hacer su tarea, pero que también son útiles a la gente en su vida profesional y en su vida personal como una forma de organizar la resolución de sus problemas, y de representar la realidad que hay en torno a ellos. Este complejo de habilidades hemos dicho que constituye una nueva alfabetización (Zapata-Ros, 2015) —o la parte más sustancial de ella— y una inculturación para manejarse en una nueva cultura, la cultura digital en la sociedad del conocimiento. De esta forma Zapata-Ros (2015) ha determinado 15 de estos elementos, entre los que hay tan diversos como pensamiento ascendente, pensamiento descendente, lenguaje de patrones o sinéctica. Sin descartar los clásicos de “aproximaciones sucesivas o ensayo error, resolución de problemas y pensamiento abstracto”. Esta definición por acumulación de habilidades también ha sido formulada por la profesora  Shuchi Grover (2018, March 13), de Stanford, quien igualmente señala la dificultad de definir el PC, y entonces adopta la posición de definirlo desglosando las habilidades como sus partes componentes. De forma que la mayor parte de ellas implican o son habilidades, pero siempre son fáciles de operativizar (son todas partes centrales de la informática, los educadores e investigadores han encontrado que es más fácil operacionalizarlo para los propósitos de la enseñanza, el currículo y el diseño de evaluaciones) y sobre todo son posibles de incluir en un diseño educativo.

Se trata de habilidades que incluyen facultades para operativizar la lógica (pensamiento lógico), los algoritmos (algoritmia), patrones, abstracción (pensamiento abstracto), generalización (pensamiento ascendente), evaluación y automatización. También significa enfoques como «descomponer» problemas en subproblemas para facilitar la resolución (pensamiento descendente), creando artefactos computacionales (generalmente a través de codificación); reutilizando soluciones, probando y depurando (ensayo y error); refinamiento iterativo (iteración). Por último, señala que el PC “también implica colaboración (métodos colaborativos) y creatividad. De manera que esta definición también por acumulación coincide en diez de los quince elementos de la definición anterior.

Hay otra coincidencia básica y es que en el artículo de Groves (2018, March 13) se señala la relevancia del Pensamiento Computacional en cuanto a que constituye una más a las ya aceptadas como competencias para la sociedad digital. En cualquier caso, lo que tienen de común ambos desarrollos es que el pensamiento computacional supone un punto de inflexión cultural, una nueva alfabetización.

En Europa, encontramos varios proyectos sobre pensamiento computacional; uno es Erasmus + KA2 «TACCLE3 – Codificación. Los contenidos presentados a través del sitio web del proyecto (http://taccle3.eu/), son un ejemplo de prácticas educativas exitosas y experiencias en el proceso de incorporación y promoción de estas habilidades (García-Peñalvo et al., 2016). Los investigadores Karen Brennan (Universidad de Harvard) y Mitch Resnick (MIT) han realizado una contribución significativa al marco conceptual sobre el pensamiento computacional al formular un modelo alternativo sobre este estilo de pensamiento. El modelo fue propuesto dentro del proyecto de investigación que resultó en la creación de Scratch, una plataforma de programación visual «por bloques» que permite a niños y jóvenes crear sus propias historias interactivas con animaciones y simulaciones en un ambiente lúdico. El modelo de pensamiento computacional formulado por Brennan y Resnick (2012) se basa en tres dimensiones: conceptos computacionales, prácticas y perspectivas.

Las habilidades para innovar o emplear el pensamiento creativo, crítico y computacional, no se pueden cultivar a través de la práctica educativa, centrándose en gran medida en la memorización del conocimiento sin proporcionar oportunidades para que los estudiantes los transfieran a la práctica y usen el conocimiento en diversas situaciones de resolución de problemas. Son necesarios enfoques educativos innovadores en todo el mundo que puedan fomentar el aprendizaje de las competencias del siglo XXI. Estos enfoques pedagógicos se deben diseñar de acuerdo con los resultados de la investigación en ciencias del aprendizaje. Krajcik y Shin (2015) enfatizaron las siguientes características de estos enfoques y describieron PBL como un enfoque de ejemplo:

  • PBL comienza con una pregunta de manejo, es decir, un problema a resolver y se enfoca en los objetivos de aprendizaje del plan de estudios que los estudiantes deben dominar.
  • Los estudiantes participan activamente en el aprendizaje y exploran la cuestión de la conducción participando colaborativamente en prácticas científicas y de ingeniería, como el diseño, la codificación, la indagación y la comunicación, que son fundamentales para el desempeño experto en ciencias e ingeniería.
  • Los estudiantes crean un conjunto de productos tangibles, como un código de programa o un robot, que abordan la pregunta de manejo. Estos artefactos compartidos son una especie de herramientas cognitivas y representaciones externas de acceso público.

En tal sentido, muchos investigadores han estado investigando la codificación y el uso de robots para apoyar la educación y el aprendizaje de los estudiantes. Los estudios han demostrado que los robots pueden ayudar a los estudiantes a desarrollar habilidades para resolver problemas y aprender programación de computadoras, matemáticas y ciencias. El enfoque educativo basado principalmente en el desarrollo de la lógica y la creatividad en las nuevas generaciones desde la primera etapa de la educación es muy prometedor (García-Valcárcel y Caballero-González, 2019). Para estos fines, el uso de sistemas robóticos se está volviendo fundamental si se aplica desde la etapa más temprana de la educación. En las escuelas primarias, secundarias y k12, la programación de robots es divertida y, por lo tanto, representa una excelente herramienta para introducir las TIC y ayudar al desarrollo de habilidades lógicas y lingüísticas, y la creatividad de los niños.

El panorama de la robótica educativa y la codificación es vasto, pero fragmentado dentro y fuera de los entornos y situaciones escolares. En las últimas dos décadas, los robots han comenzado su incursión en el sistema educativo formal. Aunque diversos investigadores han enfatizado el potencial de aprendizaje de la robótica, el lento ritmo de su introducción está parcialmente justificado por el costo de los kits y las diferentes prioridades de las escuelas para acceder a la tecnología. Recientemente, el costo de los kits y componentes electrónicos ha disminuido (es decir, LEGO Mindstorms – http://www.mindstorms.lego.com/, Arduino – https://www.arduino.cc, Raspberry Pi – https: //www.raspberrypi.org, entre otros), mientras que sus capacidades y la disponibilidad de hardware y software de soporte ha aumentado (Yiannoutsou, 2017). Con estos beneficios, los kits de robótica educativa se han vuelto más atractivos para las escuelas.
En este contexto, varios proveedores de tecnología, docentes, académicos, empresas que se centran en entregar material educativo, etc., invierten en la creación de diferentes actividades de aprendizaje en torno a kits robóticos, para mostrar sus características y hacerlas atractivas dentro y fuera de las escuelas. Por lo tanto, ha surgido un número creciente de actividades de aprendizaje. Estas actividades comparten elementos comunes, pero también son muy diversas, ya que abordan diferentes aspectos de la robótica como tecnología de enseñanza y aprendizaje, y su éxito radica en qué tan bien han identificado estos aspectos y qué tan bien los abordan.

Esto se debe en parte al hecho de que la robótica es una tecnología con características especiales en comparación con otras tecnologías de aprendizaje: son inherentemente multidisciplinarias, lo que en términos de diseño de una actividad de aprendizaje puede significar colaboración e inmersión en diferentes materias; se usan ampliamente en entornos de aprendizaje formal y no formal; su dimensión tangible causa perturbaciones, especialmente en entornos educativos formales, que están estrechamente relacionadas con la introducción de innovaciones en organizaciones y escuelas (es decir, desde considerar las orquestaciones en el aula hasta establecer o no conexiones con el plan de estudios, etc.); son relevantes para las nuevas prácticas de aprendizaje que florecen ahora en Internet, como el movimiento de creadores, las comunidades «Hágalo usted mismo» y «Hágalo con otros», etc.

Este reciente desarrollo de herramientas educativas de vanguardia, tanto de software como de hardware, ha brindado oportunidades para que los niños participen en diversas actividades tecnológicas mejoradas, tales como «exploración científica avanzada, crear textiles interactivos, construir simulaciones y juegos, programar videojuegos, diseñar un sistema de robótica virtual , crear sofisticados mundos y juegos en 3D a través de la programación, construir nuevos tipos de criaturas cibernéticas, explorar la ciencia ambiental y los sistemas de información geográfica» (Blikstien 2013, p. 5) y construir invenciones robóticas. Aunque tales desarrollos han contribuido a la popularidad del movimiento de los fabricantes y la fabricación digital, todavía hay una división en la población de usuarios potenciales entre los que tienen y los que no tienen. Es crucial llevar la educación del fabricante a todas las aulas para que todos tengan la oportunidad de aprender de las actividades del fabricante. Por esta razón, es importante identificar los resultados de aprendizaje de los estudiantes a través de actividades de creación de robótica (Wang, Lim, Lavonen y Clark-Wilson, 2019).

Algunas investigaciones proporcionan evidencia que muestra los cambios positivos que ocurren en los estudiantes inmersos en cursos de capacitación en habilidades de programación y pensamiento computacional utilizando robots programables (Chen, Shen, Barth-Cohen, Jiang, Huang y Eltoukhy, 2017; Durak y Saritepeci, 2018). En el contexto español, por ejemplo, los programas están cada vez más dirigidos a los niños en las primeras etapas de la educación en contenido matemático, como el álgebra, con el uso de dispositivos robóticos adaptados a los niños para el desarrollo exitoso de habilidades de pensamiento computacional (Alsina y Acosta, 2018). En Cuba, Matias et al. (2018) describen una experiencia en el curso de Robótica Educativa «Aprender a jugar» que se enseña a los estudiantes de una escuela k12 con el software mBlock y el kit mBot. Específicamente, se describe la programación, los diferentes componentes del robot, tales como: LED, zumbadores, motores y sensores ultrasónicos con los que los estudiantes deben interactuar.

Dado que la informática forma parte de la fabricación con robótica, proporciona el entorno adecuado en el que los estudiantes obtienen habilidades de pensamiento computacional. Por ejemplo, los estudiantes demuestran su abstracción y pensamiento algorítmico a través del algoritmo que crean, ya que un algoritmo es una abstracción de un proceso, desglosado en pasos ordenados. Dichos pasos se crean con entradas de sensor, llevan a cabo la serie de pasos ordenados y producen salidas para lograr el objetivo. Los estudiantes que pueden crear algoritmos efectivos para sus problemas desarrollan la habilidad de formular los pasos para utilizar de manera efectiva la herramienta robótica (Bruni y Nisdeo, 2017).

Esto requiere las habilidades para identificar, analizar e implementar la solución con los pasos más efectivos y eficientes. Los programadores experimentados pueden crear soluciones efectivas pero simples. Esas habilidades deben estar respaldadas por las disposiciones correctas, incluida la persistencia, la tolerancia, la capacidad de comunicarse y trabajar de manera efectiva con los demás, y la capacidad de lidiar con problemas abiertos. Dichas disposiciones se pueden obtener de su participación en la realización de actividades de robótica y el proceso de aprendizaje. A través de actividades de fabricación con robótica, los estudiantes obtienen la confianza necesaria para lidiar con la complejidad. Muy a menudo, los estudiantes encuentran problemas complejos mientras hacen robótica, lo que ayuda a los estudiantes a desarrollar la confianza para persistir.

Una forma de reducir la barrera para maestros y educadores es conectar tales actividades de aprendizaje con los estándares de aprendizaje existentes. Sin embargo, simplemente llevar las actividades de robótica a las aulas no genera automáticamente resultados de aprendizaje deseables. Con el uso de kits de robótica generalmente no hay una forma correcta de resolver un desafío. No tener una respuesta correcta sino múltiples formas de abordar un problema es una experiencia con la que muchos maestros no están familiarizados. Es por ello que se necesita, más investigación científica al respecto, en términos de intervenciones exitosas que muestren evidencia y buenas prácticas que sirvan de formación y guía a los maestros.

Referencias

Alsina, A., & Acosta, Y. (2018). Iniciación al álgebra en Educación Infantil a través del pensamiento computacional: Una experiencia sobre patrones con robots educativos programables. Revista Iberoamericana de Educación Matemática, 52, 218-235. https://bit.ly/2PC1hLt

Bell, P., Hoadley, C.M., & Linn, M.C. (2004). Design-based research. In M.C. Linn, E.A. Davis, & P. Bell (Eds.), Internet environments for science education (pp. 73-88). Mahwah, New Jersey, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Blikstien, P. (2013). Digital fabrication and ‘making in education”: The democratization of invention. In J. W. H. C. Buching (Ed.), FabLabs: Of makers and inventors. Bielefeld, Germany: Transcript Publishers.

Brennan, K., & Resnick, M. (2012). New frameworks for studying and assessing the development of computational thinking. In Proceedings of the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) (pp. 1-25). Vancouver, Canada.

Bruni, F., & Nisdeo, M. (2017). Educational robots and children’s imagery: A preliminary investigation in the first year of primary school. Research on Education and Media, 9(1), 37-44. https://doi.org/10.1515/rem-2017-0007

Chen, G., Shen, J., Barth-Cohen, L., Jiang, S., Huang, X., & Eltoukhy, M.M. (2017). Assessing elementary students’ computational thinking in everyday reasoning and robotics programming. Computers and Education, 109, 162-175. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2017.03.001

Durak, H.Y., & Saritepeci, M. (2018). Analysis of the relation between computational thinking skills and various variables with the structural equation model. Computers & Education, 116, 191-202. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2017.09.004

Fisher, R. (2005). Teaching children to think. Cheltenham: Nelson Thomes Ltd.

García-Peñalvo, F.J., Rees, A.M., Hughes, J., Jormanainen, I., Toivonen, T., & Vermeersch, J. (2016). A survey of resources for introducing coding into schools. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Technological Ecosystems for Enhancing Multiculturality (TEEM’16) (pp.19-26). Salamanca, Spain, November 2-4, 2016. New York: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/3012430.3012491

García-Valcárcel, A., y Caballero-González, Y.A. (2019). Robotics to develop computational thinking in early Childhood Education. Comunicar, n. 59, v. XXVII, 63-72. DOI: https://doi.org/10.3916/C59-2019-06

Grover, S. & Pea, R. (2013). Computational Thinking in K–12 A Review of the State of the Field. Educational Researcher. 42. doi:10.3102/0013189×12463051

Grover, S. (2018, March 13). The 5th ‘C’ of 21st century skills? Try computational thinking (not coding. Retrieved from EdSurge News: https://edtechbooks.org/-Pz

Juuti, K., & Lavonen, J. (2006). Design-Based Research in Science Education. Nordina 3(1), 54-68.

Krajcik, J., & Shin, N. (2015). Project-based learning. In K. Sawyer (Ed.), The Cambridge handbook of the learning sciences (2nd ed., pp. 275–297). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

OECD (2005). Definition and selection of competencies (DeSeCo): Executive summary. Paris: OECD Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.oecd.org/pisa/35070367.pdf

Voogt, J. & Roblin, N.P. (2012). A comparative analysis of international frameworks for 21st century competences: Implications for national curriculum policies. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 44(3), 299-321. doi:10.1080/00220272.2012.668938

Wang, TH., Lim, K.Y.T., Lavonen, J., & Clark-Wilson, a. (2019). International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 17(Suppl 1):1. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10763-019-09999-8

Yiannoutsou, N., Nikitopoulou, S., Kynigos, C., Gueorguiev, I., & Fernandez, J. A. (2017). Activity plan template: a mediating tool for supporting learning design with robotics. In Robotics in Education (pp. 3-13). Springer, Cham.

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, 46. Retrieved from http://www.um.es/ead/red/46/zapata.pdf

Zapata-Ros, M. (2019). Pensamiento computacional desenchufado. Education in the knowledge society (EKS), (20). https://repositorio.grial.eu/handle/grial/1690

 

 

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159).
Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria.
Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York.
Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

Some references and comments about coding and educational robotics and their relationship with computational and creative thinking.

Raidell Avello

University of Cienfuegos, CUBA

Jari Lavonen

Professor, Director of the National Teacher Education Reform Program

University of Helsinki, FINLAND

Miguel Zapata-Ros

University of Murcia, SPAIN

RED Editor

Member of the Interuniversity Institute of International Economics

ISSN 2386-8562

Este artículo está bajo una licencia de Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0

Debe ser citado como

Avello, R. et al (2019) Some references and comments about coding and educational robotics and their relationship with computational and creative thinking. Blog RED de Hypotheses. El aprendizaje en la Sociedad del Conocimientohttps://red.hypotheses.org/1935

The speed of change in our society has accelerated since the birth of the Internet and will accelerate rapidly through the implementation of artificial intelligence (AI) innovations, for example, in health and social care, in transport and education, as well as in the learning analysis. New technological tools, technology-based services and support are being introduced into our daily lives faster than ever. Among these technological advances, especially AI, robotic technology has increased dramatically in recent years. News headlines from major news sources, including the New York Times, CNN, Wall Street Journal and BBC, frequently present several robotic innovations, which is a strong indication of this phenomenon (Yiannoutsou, 2017).

The need for competencies development in rapidly changing societies has been debated throughout the world (Zapata, 2015) and these have been called 21st century skills/competencies or generic/transversal competences. These 21st century competencies describe the wide range of competencies necessary to fully participate in modern societies and support the employability of citizens. However, there are several definitions and connotations related to these competencies. For example, UNESCO (Five Pillars) emphasizes the definition of learning and education for sustainable development.

In the description of UNESCO Universal Learning, they analyze what learning is important for all children and young people for the 21st century and for a decent life. The OECD (DeSeCo) analyzes skills, which meet complex demands, by mobilizing psychosocial resources in different contexts. The EU (lifelong learning, 8 key competences) analyzes the competencies (knowledge, skills and attitudes) necessary for personal fulfillment, active citizenship, social inclusion and employment (Voogt and Roblin, 2012). For example, according to DeSeCo (OECD, 2005), people in the 21st century must be able to use a wide range of tools, including socio-cultural (language) and digital (technological) tools, to interact effectively with the environment, engage and interact in a heterogeneous group, carry out a work oriented to research and problem solving, assume responsibility for managing their own lives and act autonomously. In this environment, both critical thinking, including computational and creative thinking are necessary to learn these skills.

Particularly important in this context is what has been called unplugged computational thinking (CT), which Zapata-Ros (2019) refers to the set of activities and its educational design, which are developed to encourage children, in the first stages of cognitive development (early childhood education, first tranche of primary education, home games with parents and friends, etc.), skills that can then be evoked to support and enhance a good learning of computational thinking in other stages or in technical, professional or even university training. Activities that are usually done with chips, cards, board games or playground, mechanical toys, etc. And that has been incorporated into the official curricula of some countries such as Singapore and Hong Kong.

The characteristic of problem solving, such as building a robot or developing a code, is a process that consists of different steps (for example, problem formulation – evaluation of ideas – choice of solution – test and evaluation). This process requires critical, creative and computational thinking. In general, critical thinking is the analysis of facts to form a judgment. However, there are various types and situations for critical thinking and there are several different definitions, which generally include rational, skeptical, impartial analysis or the evaluation of objective evidence. And creativity is understanding as a context-related process to generate or recognize ideas, alternatives or possibilities to solve problems individually or in collaboration with others, and can be considered as original, valuable and useful by a reference group.

In this sense, creative thinking is needed when generating and playing with unusual and radical ideas related to the problem or design. Creative thinking can be stimulated by both an unstructured process and brainstorming, as well as by a structured process such as lateral thinking (Fisher, 2005). On the other hand, computational thinking is necessary to solve problems in the context of the design of a code or robot. It is necessary to design algorithms that make computers do jobs and to explain and interpret the world as a complex of information processes. The characteristics of computational thinking are decomposition, pattern recognition or data representation, generalization or abstraction and algorithms (Grover and Pea, 2013).

Computational thinking has gained great attention in the field of education in recent years, especially after the launch of Code Hour in December 2013 in the EE.UU. And England implemented its computer education in 2014 (García-Valcárcel, and Caballero-González, 2019). In a seminal article on computational thinking by Jeannette Wing in 2006, she predicted that computational thinking would be a fundamental skill used by everyone in the world in the mid-21st century (Wing 2006). In general terms, computational thinking consists of problem solving using basic concepts, procedures and development of programs and algorithms in computer science, and can help develop as: creativity, problem solving, abstract thinking, recursion, iteration, collaborative methods, patterns, among others.

However, there is a more holistic approach to what computational thinking is. This refers to the set of skills and other elements of cognitive and procedural development that we can find in the skills that serve programmers to do their homework, but which are also useful to people in their professional and personal lives as a way of organizing the resolution of their problems, and of representing the reality around them. These complex skills we said that it constitutes a new literacy (Zapata-Ros, 2015) — or the most substantial part of it — and an inculturation to handle a new culture, the digital culture in the knowledge society. In this way Zapata-Ros (2015), has determined 15 of these elements, among which there are as diverse as ascending thinking, descending thinking, pattern language or synectics. Without ruling out the classics of «successive approximations or trial error, problem solving and abstract thinking.»

This definition by accumulation of skills has also been formulated by Professor Shuchi Grover (2018, March 13), of Stanford, who also points out the difficulty of defining the CT, and then adopts the position of defining it by breaking down the skills as its component parts. So most of them involve or are skills, but they are always easy to operationalize (they are all central parts of computer science, educators and researchers have found that it is easier to operationalize for the purposes of teaching, curriculum and evaluation design) and above all they are possible to include in an educational design.

These are skills that include powers to operationalize logic (logical thinking), algorithms (algorithm), patterns, abstraction (abstract thinking), generalization (ascending thinking), evaluation and automation. It also means approaches such as «breaking down» problems into subproblems to facilitate resolution (downward thinking), creating computational artifacts (usually through coding); reusing solutions, testing and debugging (trial and error); iterative refinement (iteration). Finally, he points out that the CT “also implies collaboration (collaborative methods) and creativity”. So this definition also by accumulation coincides in ten of the fifteen elements of the previous definition.

There is another basic coincidence and it is that in the Groves article (2018, March 13) the relevance of Computational Thinking is pointed out in that it constitutes one more to those already accepted as competences for the digital society. In any case, what both developments have in common is that computational thinking is a point of cultural inflection, a new literacy.

In Europe, we find projects about computational thinking; one is Erasmus+ KA2 “TACCLE3 – Coding. The contents presented through the project’s website (http://taccle3.eu/), are an example of successful educational practices and experiences in the process of incorporation and promotion of these skills (García-Peñalvo et al., 2016). Researchers Karen Brennan (Harvard University) and Mitch Resnick (MIT) have made a significant contribution to the conceptual framework on computational thinking by formulating an alternative model on this style of thinking. The model was proposed within the research project that resulted in the creation of Scratch, a visual programming platform «by blocks» that allows children and young people to create their own interactive stories with animations and simulations in a playful environment. The model of computational thinking formulated by Brennan and Resnick (2012) is based on three dimensions: computational concepts, practices, and perspectives.

The skills to innovate or employ creative, critical and computational thinking cannot be cultivated through educational practice, focusing largely on memorizing knowledge without providing opportunities for students to transfer them to practice and use knowledge in various problem solving situations. There are urgent calls for innovative educational approaches worldwide that can foster the learning of 21st century competences, especially competences needed for innovators including critical thinking, problem-solving, creativity, inventiveness, collaboration and teamwork, and communication skills through transdisciplinary, learner-centered, collaborative, and project-based learning (PBL). These pedagogical approaches have been designed according to learning science research outcomes. Krajcik and Shin (2015), emphasized the following characteristics of these approaches and describe PBL as an example approach:

  • PBL starts with a driving question, that is, a problem to be solved and focuses on the learning goals of the curriculum that students are required to master.
  • Students are active in learning and explore the driving question by participating collaboratively in scientific and engineering practices, like designing, coding, inquiring and communicating, that are central to expert performance in science and engineering.
  • Students create a set of tangible products, like a program code or a robot, that address the driving question. These are shared artefacts are kind of cognitive tools and publicly accessible external representations.

In this regard, many researchers have been investigating the coding and use of robots to support the education and learning of students. Studies have shown that robots can help students develop problem solving skills and learn computer programming, math and science. The educational approach based mainly on the development of logic and creativity in the new generations since the first stage of education is very promising (García-Valcárcel and Caballero-González, 2019). For these purposes, the use of robotic systems is becoming fundamental if applied from the earliest stage of education. In elementary, secondary and k12 schools, robot programming is fun and, therefore, represents an excellent tool for introducing ICTs and helping the development of logical and linguistic skills, and children’s creativity.

The landscape of educational robotics and coding is vast, but fragmented inside and outside school environments and situations. In the last two decades, robots have begun their incursion into the formal education system. Although several researchers have emphasized the learning potential of robotics, the slow pace of its introduction is partially justified by the cost of the kits and the different priorities of schools to access technology. Recently, the cost of electronic kits and components has decreased (i.e., LEGO Mindstorms – http://www.mindstorms.lego.com/, Arduino – https://www.arduino.cc, Raspberry Pi – https: / /www.raspberrypi.org, among others), while its capabilities and the availability of hardware and support software have increased (Yiannoutsou, 2017). With these benefits, educational robotics kits have become more attractive to schools.

In this context, several technology providers, teachers, academics, companies that focus on delivering educational material, etc., invest in the creation of different learning activities around robotic kits, to show their characteristics and make them attractive inside and outside of schools. Therefore, an increasing number of learning activities has emerged. These activities share common elements, but they are also very diverse, since they address different aspects of robotics as teaching and learning technology, and their success lies in how well they have identified these aspects and how well they address them.

This is partly due to the fact that robotics is a technology with special characteristics compared to other learning technologies: they are inherently multidisciplinary, which in terms of design of a learning activity can mean collaboration and immersion in different subjects; they are widely used in formal and non-formal learning environments; its tangible dimension causes disturbances, especially in formal educational environments, which are closely related to the introduction of innovations in organizations and schools (that is, from considering orchestrations in the classroom to establishing or not establishing connections with the curriculum, etc.); they are relevant to the new learning practices that now flourish on the Internet, such as the creators’ movement, the «Do it yourself» and «Do it with others» communities, etc.

This recent development of cutting-edge educational tools, both software and hardware, has provided opportunities for children to participate in various improved technological activities, such as «advanced scientific exploration, creating interactive textiles, building simulations and games, programming video games, designing a virtual robotics system, create sophisticated worlds and 3D games through programming, build new types of cybernetic creatures, explore environmental science and geographic information systems» (Blikstien 2013, p. 5) and build robotic inventions. Although such developments have contributed to the popularity of the movement of manufacturers and digital manufacturing, there is still a division in the population of potential users between those who have and those who do not. It is crucial to bring the education of the manufacturer to all classrooms so that everyone has the opportunity to learn from the activities of the manufacturer. For this reason, it is important to identify student learning outcomes through robotics creation activities (Wang, Lim, Lavonen and Clark-Wilson, 2019).

Some research provides evidence that shows the positive changes that occur in students immersed in training courses in programming skills and computational thinking using programmable robots (Chen, Shen, Barth-Cohen, Jiang, Huang and Eltoukhy, 2017; Durak and Saritepeci, 2018). In the Spanish context, for example, programs are increasingly aimed at children in the early stages of education in mathematical content, such as algebra, with the use of robotic devices adapted to children for the successful development of skills computational thinking (Alsina and Acosta, 2018). In Cuba, Matias et al. (2018) describe an experience in the course of Educational Robotics «Learn to play» taught to students of a k12 school with the mBlock software and the mBot kit. Specifically, the programming is described, the different components of the robot, such as: LEDs, buzzers, motors and ultrasonic sensors with which students must interact.

Since computer science is part of robotics manufacturing, it provides the right environment in which students gain computational thinking skills. For example, students demonstrate their abstraction and algorithmic thinking through the algorithm they create, since an algorithm is an abstraction of a process, broken down in orderly steps. These steps are created with sensor inputs, carry out the series of ordered steps and produce outputs to achieve the objective. Students who can create effective algorithms for their problems develop the ability to formulate the steps to effectively use the robotic tool (Bruni and Nisdeo, 2017).

This requires the skills to identify, analyse and implement the solution with the most effective and efficient steps. Experienced programmers can create effective but simple solutions. These skills must be supported by the right provisions, including persistence, tolerance, the ability to communicate and work effectively with others, and the ability to deal with open problems. These provisions can be obtained from your participation in the performance of robotics activities and the learning process. Through robotics manufacturing activities, students gain the necessary confidence to deal with complexity. Very often, students encounter complex problems while doing robotics, which helps students build confidence to persist.

One way to reduce the barrier for teachers and educators is to connect such learning activities with existing learning standards. However, simply taking robotics activities to classrooms does not automatically generate desirable learning outcomes. With the use of robotics kits there is generally no correct way to solve a challenge. Not having a correct answer but multiple ways of addressing a problem is an experience that many teachers are not familiar with. That is why more scientific research is needed in this regard, in terms of successful interventions that show evidence and good practices that serve as training and guides teachers.

References

Alsina, A., & Acosta, Y. (2018). Iniciación al álgebra en Educación Infantil a través del pensamiento computacional: Una experiencia sobre patrones con robots educativos programables. Revista Iberoamericana de Educación Matemática, 52, 218-235. https://bit.ly/2PC1hLt

Bell, P., Hoadley, C.M., & Linn, M.C. (2004). Design-based research. In M.C. Linn, E.A. Davis, & P. Bell (Eds.), Internet environments for science education (pp. 73-88). Mahwah, New Jersey, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Blikstien, P. (2013). Digital fabrication and ‘making in education”: The democratization of invention. In J. W. H. C. Buching (Ed.), FabLabs: Of makers and inventors. Bielefeld, Germany: Transcript Publishers.

Brennan, K., & Resnick, M. (2012). New frameworks for studying and assessing the development of computational thinking. In Proceedings of the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) (pp. 1-25). Vancouver, Canada.

Bruni, F., & Nisdeo, M. (2017). Educational robots and children’s imagery: A preliminary investigation in the first year of primary school. Research on Education and Media, 9(1), 37-44. https://doi.org/10.1515/rem-2017-0007

Chen, G., Shen, J., Barth-Cohen, L., Jiang, S., Huang, X., & Eltoukhy, M.M. (2017). Assessing elementary students’ computational thinking in everyday reasoning and robotics programming. Computers and Education, 109, 162-175. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2017.03.001

Durak, H.Y., & Saritepeci, M. (2018). Analysis of the relation between computational thinking skills and various variables with the structural equation model. Computers & Education, 116, 191-202. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2017.09.004

Fisher, R. (2005). Teaching children to think. Cheltenham: Nelson Thomes Ltd.

García-Peñalvo, F.J., Rees, A.M., Hughes, J., Jormanainen, I., Toivonen, T., & Vermeersch, J. (2016). A survey of resources for introducing coding into schools. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Technological Ecosystems for Enhancing Multiculturality (TEEM’16) (pp.19-26). Salamanca, Spain, November 2-4, 2016. New York: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/3012430.3012491

García-Valcárcel, A., y Caballero-González, Y.A. (2019). Robotics to develop computational thinking in early Childhood Education. Comunicar, n. 59, v. XXVII, 63-72. DOI: https://doi.org/10.3916/C59-2019-06

Grover, S. & Pea, R. (2013). Computational Thinking in K–12 A Review of the State of the Field. Educational Researcher. 42. doi:10.3102/0013189×12463051

Grover, S. (2018, March 13). The 5th ‘C’ of 21st century skills? Try computational thinking (not coding. Retrieved from EdSurge News: https://edtechbooks.org/-Pz

Juuti, K., & Lavonen, J. (2006). Design-Based Research in Science Education. Nordina 3(1), 54-68.

Krajcik, J., & Shin, N. (2015). Project-based learning. In K. Sawyer (Ed.), The Cambridge handbook of the learning sciences (2nd ed., pp. 275–297). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

OECD (2005). Definition and selection of competencies (DeSeCo): Executive summary. Paris: OECD Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.oecd.org/pisa/35070367.pdf

Voogt, J. & Roblin, N.P. (2012). A comparative analysis of international frameworks for 21st century competences: Implications for national curriculum policies. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 44(3), 299-321. doi:10.1080/00220272.2012.668938

Wang, TH., Lim, K.Y.T., Lavonen, J., & Clark-Wilson, a. (2019). International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 17(Suppl 1):1. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10763-019-09999-8

Yiannoutsou, N., Nikitopoulou, S., Kynigos, C., Gueorguiev, I., & Fernandez, J. A. (2017). Activity plan template: a mediating tool for supporting learning design with robotics. In Robotics in Education (pp. 3-13). Springer, Cham.

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, 46. Retrieved from http://www.um.es/ead/red/46/zapata.pdf

Zapata-Ros, M. (2019). Pensamiento computacional desenchufado. Education in the knowledge society (EKS), (20). https://repositorio.grial.eu/handle/grial/1690

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159).
Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria.
Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York.
Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

Por qué las universidades empiezan a no utilizar los campus virtuales tradicionales (los LMS) de forma relevante. ¿Cómo están siendo sustituidos? (II)

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Murcia

ISSN 2386-8562

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.21039.69286.

Este artículo está bajo una licencia de Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0

Debe ser citado como:

Zapata-Ros, M. (Julio 2019). Por qué las universidades empiezan a no utilizar los campus virtuales (los LMS) de forma relevante ¿Cómo y por qué sistemas están siendo sustituidos? Preprint. Researchgate – Proyecto Disrupciones en educación superior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.21039.69286.

En la entrada anterior señalábamos que «hay casi tanta gente de la educación en línea que utiliza las plataformas LMS como fuera de ellas». Continuamos:

3

Esto contrasta con el aumento de la población universitaria en educación a distancia, y obviamente en entornos online. En la gráfica siguiente podemos ver la evolución de este tipo de educación en el mismo entorno en el que operan los LMS tomados como referencia del estudio anterior

Figura 6. GRADE INCREASE TRACKING DISTANCE EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES Julia E. Seaman, I. Elaine Allen and Jeff Seaman. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED580852.pdf

4.

El otro fenómeno importante, a nuestro juicio, lo constituyen las disrupciones universitarias que se empezaron a producir con los MOOC y que continuaron después y continúan ahora con algo mucho más serio que aquellos. Actualmente son decenas de universidades norteamericanas y europeas que incluyen no sólo acreditations, micromasters o nanodegrees que son títulos oficiales y que acumulados otorgan certificaciones de grado o de máster de esas prestigiosas universidades, sino que ofrecen ya decenas, sólo en UK, de títulos de grado y de máster con acreditación similar a los restantes, pero que ahora se obtienen con este marco metodológico y con los nuevos soportes tecnológicos.

En este momento podemos decir que las innovaciones disruptivas universitarias, en el sentido que las define Christensen (2012) (2013) (Zapata-Ros, 2018 July 2) ocupan ya un lugar central y con plena propiedad entre los títulos convencionales universitarios de las más prestigiosas universidades.

Este es pues el cuarto dato que ofrecemos como información y que desarrollamos ahora, pero que en el contexto de este post también constituye una respuesta a la pregunta ¿los LMS por quién o por qué están siendo sustituidos?

Podemos retrotraernos a unos años antes y ver qué ha pasado con las disrupciones universitarias. Sosteníamos que los MOOC eran sólo la parte visible de un fenómeno de mucho más calado. Las mismas o parecidas disrupciones que se producían en otros entornos y en otros sectores, ahora afectaban a la Universidad. Señalábamos igualmente que estas disrupciones pronto pasarían a ocupar el escenario, sustituyendo a los MOOC, de forma mucho más silenciosa pero mucho más eficaz. El espíritu que animaba estas innovaciones disruptivas era (y utilizo el pasado porque ya ha concluido en donde se produjeron la transición y estamos en plena época de expansión, como en 2012 lo estábamos de los MOOC): desposeer en aras de la sostenibilidad a los estudios universitarios de todo tipo de contenidos no estrictamente necesarios, de las grasas, decían, y dejarlos justamente con lo necesario para desarrollar con el grado de dominio justo las habilidades que se estiman precisas para un desempeño profesional específico.

La implementación de estos sistemas se hace en intima conexión entre la universidad o universidades que los organiza, la empresa patrocinadora y la plataforma titular de las disrupciones (EDX, Coursera, Udacity,…). Habitualmente las universidades que los organizan son de excelencia y las empresas son corporaciones tecnológicas  como Google, Amazon, Cisco,… pero el modelo es ya mucho más extendido.

Vamos a verlo en tres fases

1. Estado después de los MOOC. Nanodegrees, micromaster y “dual layer”

Hace cinco años decíamos que la estructura híbrida de algunos Másteres que llevan un xMOOC adosado, permite un flujo entre las dos estructuras, y posibilita que estos alumnos puedan ser captados. En 2016 ya directamente las estructuras de rendimiento (nanodegrees, micromaster, “dual layer”) permitían hacerlo directamente. Decíamos que esto, la captación de su talento, supone un peligro estructural que las universidades y los gobiernos de los países periféricos deben afrontar. Y deben hacerlo cambiando en profundidad la naturaleza y estructura de los estudios universitarios. Pero no, o no sólo, cambiándolo en aspectos tecnológicos, éste es el error, es la percepción trivial del asunto, sino hacerlo con estructuras, sistemas, métodos y talantes que permitan una ayuda personalizada y tutorizada. Un cambio de la naturaleza que hemos descrito, que permita a este tipo de alumnos, los talentosos, integrase en una educación superior de calidad, y satisfactoria para sus expectativas, en su propio entorno de origen.

En esa época, si bien descartamos que se fuera a producir una sustitución aún parcial de los estudios universitarios reglados por alguna modalidad de MOOC, decíamos que sí que es previsible que las modalidades de disrupciones universitarias de rendimiento  emergentes (nanodegrees, micromaster y “dual layer”) desplacen en el hábitat de los estudios superiores periféricos un número mayor o menor de las propuestas existentes, sobre todo a las que no se adapten, al igual a como ha sucedido en otros ámbitos de las actividades productivas o de los servicios: Las finanzas, los medios de comunicación, el mundo editorial, o el comercio y distribución de mercancías.

Esas modalidades de estudios están descritas en estos ejemplos

Micro masters de Udacity https://www.udacity.com/georgia-tech

Nanodegres de Udacity https://eu.udacity.com/nanodegree

Micromaster EDX-MIT https://micromasters.mit.edu/

Nanodegrees de Coursera https://blog.coursera.org/degrees/

Masters dual layer EDX  https://www.edx.org/course/data-analytics-and-learning  y https://www.edugeekjournal.com/2014/05/04/designing-a-dual-layer-cmoocxmooc/

En aquella época dudábamos que estas disrupciones (Nanodegrees, micromasters, “dual layer”) fuesen todavía capaces de sustituir a los estudios universitarios reglados. Incluso se señalan casos de rechazo: En la Universidad Sstatal de San José se hizo laexperiencia (Udacity) y tuvo que deshacerse por presiones de los propios profesores. En algunos casos como en las universidades de Coursera, lo más que llegan es a acreditar en el modelo oficial a alumnos procedentes de los MOOC.  Pero sobre todo el caso que más ha avanzado en esta línea es el de Udacity, con el máster del Georgia Tech que es la evolución de los xMOOC a partir del modelo rechazado en su configuración actual por Thrun en su entrevista y declaraciones a la revista Fast Company, y lo han reconvertido en Máster. Otro tanto sucede con los cMOOC y con los xMOOC de EDX-Fundación Belinda y Bill Gates, tras la adscripción de Siemens a esta organización: En este caso adosan un MOOC a un Máster con pasarelas.

Se decía pues entonces que no eran viables los cursos desarrollados por estas agencias como estudios convencionales por la imposibilidad de integrarse en un marco de gestión académica deseable, con diseño instrucccional, evaluación, acreditación, etc., un sistema que no es evaluativo, que apenas tiene interacción profesor-alumno, y sobre todo que no satisface requisitos mínimos de eficiencia de algún tipo de aprendizajes, como ya hemos tratado suficientemente cuando se trata de aprendizaje divergente. Sin embargo, todo esto cambió después como veremos.

2. Año 2016: Credentials, College credits y degrees

Se puede establecer este año como el del paso de cursos y programas, que otorgaban acreditación a los egresados que iban a desempeñar habilidades específicas, pero que no otorgaban títulos oficiales, a los que sí los otorgaban directamente o que sumados con otros y por acumulación otorgaban un grado o un máster.

Shah (December 2016) los clasifica en College Credit, Credentials o Degrees:

En todos ellos se obtiene una certificación oficial de la universidad utilizando la tecnología que nació con los MOOC sólo que adaptando temas de asistencia tutorial y pedagógica a los alumnos, que es más adaptativa, y el procedimiento de extender la acreditación en función de los logros alcanzados y demostrados como competencias específicas. Así FutureLearn oferta seis títulos de máster en la Universidad Deakin, y Kadenze lanzó su propia credencial que es reconocida por sus socios: California Institute of the Arts, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Ringling College of Art and Design, Paris College of Art, Simon Fraser University, Rhode Island School of Design, Columbus College of Art y Design, Arizona State University (Herberger School of Art), Pacific Northwest College of Art, y The School of Visual Arts.

Credentials

En este contexto una Credential (se puede traducir como»carta credencial», pero también como “acreditación”) es un programa de certificados, basados en tecnología MOOC que requieren que los estudiantes completen una secuencia de cursos (que podrían ser considerados como una especie de asignaturas independientes) en un área temática particular. Ahí estarías las Especializaciones de Coursera, los Nanodegrees de Udacity o las XSeries de EDX. Los programas de Credentials son diplomas universitarios acreditados, y el crédito en este caso se refiere al crédito universitario (nuestros créditos ECTS) que puede utilizarse para avanzar hacia un título universitario.

En 2016 solamente Future learn y Kadenze tenían más de 250 credenciales basadas en MOOC disponibles. Estas nuevas credenciales permiten a los alumnos demostrar (ante ellos mismos, sus compañeros, sus empleadores actuales o los futuros), que han alcanzado algún nivel de competencia en áreas de habilidades específicas.

EDX por su parte incluyó en esta modalidad los MicroMasters y las XSeries

Los primeros realizaron pruebas piloto con MIT en octubre de 2015. Y su credencial de MicroMasters fue adoptada por catorce universidades ubicadas en ocho países diferentes: India, España, Bélgica, Guatemala, Hong Kong, Australia, los Países Bajos y los Estados Unidos. Después se unieron veinte MicroMasters más. Los incluimos aquí porque no son MicroMaster aunque lleven ese nombre, no son estudios aislados sino que constituyen series. Aunque

EdX ya tenía sus  programas XSeries , que no eran credenciales basadas en una secuencia de cursos . La diferencia entre XSeries y MicroMasters es que si el estudiante que obtuvo la credencial es aceptado en el programa en el campus tecnologico, este último otorga un crédito que cuenta para obtener una maestría completa. En 2016 edX cuenta con 45 programas XSeries, 26 de los cuales se agregaron en 2016.

Por su parte Coursera y Udacity también se integran en esta tendencia de credenciales obtenidas por series de programas formativos.

Coursera tenía en 2016 160 Especializaciones, consideradas como credentials.

Y finalmente, Udacity tenía en esa época doce Nanodegrees activos con 13.000 estudiantes inscritos en estos Nanodegrees. Antes 3.000 estudiantes se graduaron con la credencial de Nanodegree y más de 900 estudiantes han obtenido trabajos relacionados con su programa de Nanodegree. Se pueden encontrar más detalles en el artículo Udacity’s 2016: Year in Review .

College Credits (Créditos Universitarios) y Degrees (Grados)

Nos referimos a créditos universitarios basados ​​en MOOC. En 2016 se podían conseguir de tres tipos, o agrupados en tres formas de conseguirlos: créditos de un solo curso, créditos por una secuencia de cursos y títulos en línea completos.

Podemos acceder a una lista completa en MOOCs for Credit.

Créditos de curso único los ofrecen EdX y Kadenze.

EdX constituyó la Global Freshman Academy con la Universidad del Sur de Arizona (ASU)

Kadenze, una plataforma centrada en las artes, tenía en esa época 13 cursos de este tipo.

  1. Creditos (College credits) por secuencias de cursos

Cursos de este tipo los ofrecían FutureLearn y Kadenze.

Todos los MicroMasters de edX tiene una correspondencia con un Master oficial de manera que si un estudiante obtiene la credencial es aceptado en el programa en del campus oficial.

Igual sucedía con las especializaciones en línea que forman parte del programa de MBA de Coursera y UIUC: pueden tomarse para obtener créditos sin inscribirse en el programa de grado completo.

2. Degrees (Grados Oficiales)

El primer grado basado en una plataforma de tecnología MOOC que se lanzó fue el Ciencias de la Computación (OMSCS) de Georgia Tech y Udacity, en 2013. El grado completo costaba ¡menos de $ 7,000!.

Coursera tiene grados basados en la tecnología y en las plataformas MOOC desde el año 2015,  cuando se asoció con la Universidad de Illinois para ofrecer su primer MBA en línea: «iMBA». Según un artículo reciente en Inside Higher Ed 

Después se sumaron FutureLearn y OpenLearning.

FutureLearn con seis títulos de postgrado de la Universidad Deakin,

Ambas iniciativas operan bajo el Marco de Calificaciones de Australia (AQF). FutureLearn ofrece un nivel 8 y cinco niveles de nivel 9, mientras que OpenLearning ofrece dos niveles 4 – Certificado IV – grados. Puede encontrar más información sobre los niveles de AQF aquí .

La mayoría de los cursos en FutureLearn grados no serán gratuitos. Cada grado consistirá en 80 cursos de dos semanas, de los cuales hasta 16 serán gratuitos.

Hasta aquí los ejemplos, obtenidos en 2016, de decenas y decenas de títulos oficiales que se obtenían con iniciativas disruptivas basadas en la tecnología MOOC adaptada con asistencia, evaluación individual y obviamente con costes similares aunque algoi menores que los títulos oficiales convencionales. Muchos de estos títulos se ofrecen igualmente en EE UU, Canadá, UK o Japón que en otros países desarrollados o periféricos.


3. Situación en 2018: Academic degrees y Master’s degrees

Además de los estudios señalados en el apartado anterior, que perviven y se incrementan en cuanto a participación hasta nuestros días, constituyendo ya una opción de estudios universitarios perfectamente consolidada y a tener en cuenta, el día 6 de Marzo de 2018 aparece un artículo de Ellie Bothwell en Times Higher Education (THE) a partir de cual podemos constatar un considerable número de casos donde el procedimiento es a la inversa: Son los estudios convencionales y con tradición los que se pasan en bloque a las nuevas plataformas que son la transformación y adaptación de los originales sistemas de MOOC de Coursera y de FutureLearn.

No es de extrañar que sean precisamente estas plataformas, las que maduren y evolucionen hacia una modalidad de docencia universitaria que en otras ocasiones hemos señalado como de más calidad, desde la perspectiva de las teorías y principios clásicos del aprendizaje, las que sean adoptadas por universidades de excelencia británicas para sumergir en ellas sus títulos de más prestigio completos. De hecho, en trabajos anteriores (Zapata-Ros, Agosto 2013 y 2015) poníamos de relieve el depurado diseño instruccional que subyacía tras la metodología aparentemente simple de Coursera. Ese diseño y sus guías y documentaciones con sus avales teóricos (Fink, 2003),  los hemos utilizado como base de una propuesta concreta de diseño instruccional para cursos abiertos online[1].

La plataforma de aprendizaje en línea Coursera está impartiendo el título de Licenciado en Ciencias de la Computación de la Universidad de Londres completamente en línea siguiendo las líneas metodológicas de esta plataforma y su metodología.

La información que ofrece Coursera sobre Computer Science BSc es sencilla pero interesante. La estructura de los estudios de esta licenciatura permite tener alumnos en cualquier parte del mundo por un precio bastante asequible. Pero sobre todo, si entramos en detalles, visibles y muy esmerados en el folleto informativo (prospectus), tenemos acceso a una detallada información, académicamente muy cuidada, en el sentido que es una transcripción de los principios del aprendizaje, de donde obtiene su fundamento, en una literatura fácilmente comprensible por el estudiante medio.

Esta información del prospecto aborda aspectos fundamentales del diseño de la licenciatura, como son:

  • Objetivos educativos y resultados de aprendizaje (learning outcomes), en el sentido que atribuimos a esta expresión anteriormente (aquí, aquí, y sobre todo en el libro de la ANECA coordinado por Carmen Vizcarro), no utilizando la expresión competencias, pero sabiamente asegurado con creces con algo más que suficiente, con una aplicación del principio de demostración adaptado a cada situación de aprendizaje.
  • Estrategias de aprendizaje, enseñanza y evaluación.
  • Métodos de evaluación
  • Apoyo y orientación al alumno
  • Evaluación y mejora de la calidad

Pero sobre todo reclamamos la atención sobre lo cuidado de este diseño instruccional en una cuestión. Se trata del uso del principio de demostración propuesto por Merrill.

En su trabajo First principles of instructionEducational technology research and development, Merrill (2002) desarrolla esta idea (first priciples), lo hace decantando los principios subyacentes en los que hay consensos, en los que hay un acuerdo esencial, en todas las teorías y que previamente ha identificado.

En un trabajo anterior (Zapata-Ros, Diciembre 2018) citando al trabajo First principles of instruction decíamos

“Este documento se refiere a [unos métodos considerados] métodos variables, como programas y prácticas. Un principio fundamental (Merrill, 2002), o un método básico según Reigeluth (1999), es un aserto que siempre es verdadero bajo las condiciones apropiadas independientemente del programa o de la práctica en que se aplique, que de esta forma dan lugar a un método variable. Teniendo en cuenta como el mismo Merrill (2002) las define:

Una práctica es una actividad instruccional específica. Un programa es un enfoque que consiste en un conjunto de prácticas prescritas. Las prácticas siempre implementan o no implementan los principios subyacentes ya sea que estos principios se especifiquen o no. Un enfoque de instrucción dado solo puede enfatizar la implementación de uno o más de estos principios de instrucción. Los mismos principios pueden ser implementados por una amplia variedad de programas y prácticas.

De esta forma Merrill propuso un conjunto de cinco principios instruccionales prescriptivos (o “principios fundamentales”) que mejoran la calidad de la enseñanza en todas las situaciones (Merrill, 2007 , 2009 ). Esos principios tienen que ver con la centralidad de la tarea, la activación, la demostración, la aplicación y la integración.

Para ello Merrill (2002) propone un esquema en fases como el más eficiente para el aprendizaje, de manera que centran el problema y crean un entorno que implica al alumno  para la resolución de cualquier problema En cuatro fases distintas, cuando habitualmente solo se hace en una: la de demostración, reduciendo todo el problema a que el alumno pueda demostrar su conocimiento o su habilidad en la resolución del problema en una última fase. 

Son las FASES DE INSTRUCCIÓN

Fig. 7

Las fases son (a) activación de experiencia previa, (b) demostración de habilidades, (c) aplicación de habilidades, y (d) integración de estas habilidades en actividades del mundo real.

Así la figura anterior proporciona un marco conceptual para establecer y relacionar los principios fundamentales de la instrucción. De ellos uno tiene que ver con la implicación y la naturaleza real del problema, así percibida por el alumno, y los cuatro restantes para cada una de las fases. Así estos cinco principios enunciados en su forma más concisa (Merrill 2002) son

  1. El aprendizaje se promueve cuando los estudiantes se comprometen a resolver problemas del mundo real. Es decir, el aprendizaje se promueve cuando es un aprendizaje centrado en la tarea.
  2. El aprendizaje se favorece cuando existen conocimientos que se activan como base para el nuevo conocimiento.
  3. El aprendizaje se promueve cuando se centra en que el alumno debe demostrar su nuevo conocimiento. Y el alumno es consciente de ello.
  4. El aprendizaje se promueve igualmente cuando se centra en que el aprendiz aplique el nuevo conocimiento. Y por último
  5. El aprendizaje se favorece cuando el nuevo conocimiento se tienede a que se integre en el mundo del alumno.

De ellos, para este caso, nos quedamos con el tercero, el principio de la demostración, que es en el que se basan en los estudios de grado de la Universidad de Londres. De igual forma que el principio tercero. el de activación, lo utilizábamos para justificar el pensamiento computacional unplugged.

Aquí pues vamos a hablar de un principio que han tenido en cuenta de forma muy relevante los diseñadores de la licenciatura de Ciencias de la Computación, sobre todo cuando han hablado de objetivos (resultados de aprendizaje, learning outcomes) y de evaluación, íntimamente ligada a ellos por el diseño instruccional. Obviamente nos referimos al PRINCIPIO DE ACTIVACIÓN.

Así lo establecen en el Programme Specification 2018-2019 Computer Science (BSc)en los fines educativos y resultados de aprendizaje, página 10 a12.

Fig. 8

Los estudiantes que completen con éxito la Licenciatura en Ciencias de la Computación (…) deben ser capaces de

Demostrar conocimiento de las principales áreas de la informática y la capacidad de Aplicar esto dentro del contexto de las aplicaciones informáticas.

  • Mostrarhabilidades de resolución de problemas y evaluación, basándose en evidencia de apoyo.
  • Demostrarla capacidad de producir un trabajo organizado con la orientación adecuada.

Los alumnos que completen con éxito el Diploma de Educación Superior en Informática de la ciencia será capaz de:

  • Demostrarconocimiento y comprensión crítica de las principales áreas de ciencias de la computación y también demostrar la capacidad de aplicar esto a la evaluación de aplicaciones informáticas

  • Mostrarhabilidades de resolución de problemas y evaluación, basarse en evidencia de apoyo y demostrar una comprensión general de la necesidad de una solución de alta calidad
  • Demostrarla capacidad de producir trabajo organizado (tanto individualmente como en parte de un equipo) dado la orientación adecuada.

Los estudiantes que completen con éxito la Licenciatura en Ciencias de la Computación, además de los objetivos de aprendizaje del Diploma de Educación Superior y Certificado de Educación Superior, deber ser capaces de:

  • Demostraruna comprensión sólida de todas las áreas principales de informática y también demostrar la capacidad de ejercer un juicio crítico en la evaluación de aplicaciones informáticas.

  • Mostrar habilidades de resolución de problemas y evaluación crítica, recurrir a evidencia de apoyo y demostraruna comprensión profunda de la necesidad de una solución de alta calidad.
  • Demostrar la capacidad de producir un trabajo organizado con una guía mínima.
  • Demostrarla capacidad de producir un trabajo sustancial desde el inicio del problema a la implementación y documentación.

Y así sucesivamente.

Otra manifestación de la potencia del sistema lo constituye, en el prospecto, en el apartado de Learning, teaching and assessment strategies, lo que llama The core principles of the learning, teaching and assessment strategy (pag. 11). Son siete principios en los que basa toda la metodología, todas las estrategias para el aprendizaje la enseñanza y la evaluación. 

Como dijimos, es la parte que llega al público de unas depuradas y concienzudas elaboraciones que previamente se han hecho a partir de una sólida base pedagógica. De entre ellos destacamos el principio de flexibilidad y el de evaluación:

Fig. 9

En ellos se percibe claramente el principio de Mastery Learning (Los estudiantes progresan a un ritmo adecuado para sus circunstancias) y explícitamente el de evaluación sumativa:

Se diseñarán métodos de evaluación sumativa para promover la retención [dominio] de conocimiento, proporcionando estímulo a través de la retroalimentación del tutor , con una amplia gama de métodos como sea posible para evaluar más efectivamente los resultados de aprendizaje.

Y en la evaluación, conservando los métodos tradicionales como alternativa, promueve como una parte considerable de la evaluación una mezcla de aprendizaje/evaluación basada en proyectos, con Mastery Learning: una retroalimentación para que los alumnos avancen en función de los logros parciales:

Fig. 10

Obviamente un solo caso, aunque sea tan significativo como éste, no demuestra una tendencia ni mucho menos un cambio sustancial. Sin embargo es una muestra bastante significativa de que esta nueva forma de universidad es posible y viable en instituciones muy consolidadas. Además se hace con un empeño de medios y esfuerzo en desarrollo considerable, que manifiesta una confianza decidida en el modelo. 

Esto coincide con el análisis que desde hace años venimos manteniendo de que los MOOC fueron el síntoma efímero de un cambio de mucho más calado que afectaría a fondo los sistemas universitarios vigentes: Eran y son las disrupciones universitarias, semejantes a las que se producen en otros sectores y servicios. Y a las que, en la terminología que Christensen desarrolla en su teoría para estas innovaciones, habría que afrontar en sus núcleos no extensibles. Como son en este caso la calidad de los diseños, de sistemas de universidades abiertas y en línea, basados en los que se consideran principios del aprendizaje, diseño instruccional y de las pedagogías derivadas que potencian la atención y la ayuda a los alumnos de forma singularizada y adaptativa utilizando las posibilidades que la tecnología ofrece. Ese diseño y esas potencias de las universidades constituyen el núcleo no extensible (Zapata-Ros, 2013 y 2014) de esas innovaciones.

Por último, en esta línea de inmersión de programas completos existentes en el modelo disruptivo es de destacar el papel desempeñado por FutureLearn, plataforma de Open University, de llevar completo el programa de postgrado en su plataforma a través de una asociación con la Universidad Deakin de Australia. Después se une a la asociación la Universidad de Coventry.

Además de lo dicho sobre la Universidad de Londres (Goldmitsh) Coursera también puso en marcha cuatro nuevos títulos oficales de máster en EE. UU., que incluyen programas de informática de la Universidad Estatal de Arizona y la Universidad de Illinois en Urbana-Champaign, y títulos de ciencia de datos aplicados y salud pública de la Universidad de Michigan.

5

Hay otra realidad emergente, aunque hasta ahora poco extendida en sus experiencias pero que sin duda está llamada a tener un gran impacto, y así es sentida por la sociedad, como demuestra con carácter general, el manifiesto “Consenso de Beijing en Inteligencia Artificial y Educación” (Documento final de la Conferencia Internacional sobre Inteligencia Artificial y Educación ‘Planificando la educación en la era de la IA: Liderar el salto’),  del que se hizo eco ProFututo de Fundación Telefónica con el documento “Inteligencia Artificial en la Educación: Retos y Oportunidades para el Desarrollo” presentado en Madrid el pasado día 24 de junio en Madrid.

Pero, en particular, en lo que respecta a docencia universitaria, veremos qué pasa realmente con la otra opción emergente: Los entornos inteligentes de enseñanza superior, las Smart Universities.

En el número monográfico de RED dedicado a «Web social y sistemas inteligentes de gestión de aprendizaje en Educación Superior” presentamos un trabajo titulado La universidad inteligente. En él, comenzábamos con una propuesta de caracterización de lo que consideramos aprendizaje inteligente y definíamos los entornos inteligentes como la culminación de una línea de desarrollo que se iniciaba con los entornos adaptativos, continuaba con los entornos sensibles de contexto y culminaba con los entornos inteligentes:

Fig. 11

En el mismo trabajo, a continuación hacíamos una propuesta de modelo de sistema inteligente. Por último, tras una indagación en los documentos y lugares de referencia y del correspondientes análisis de casos, seleccionamos tres de ellos como experiencias relevantes institucionales, en estudios oficiales, que estaban consolidados y constituían una propuesta concreta de diseño y de desarrollo instruccional de aprendizaje inteligente universitario.

Éste fue el resultado, con las iniciativas consolidadas que reunían esos requisitos:

BIO100 de Global Freshman Academy

Entre los varios ejemplos significativos que hay de la adopción de la IA para organizar el aprendizaje y la asistencia a los alumnos, podemos destacar el de la Arizona State University, particularmente el caso de la Global Freshman Academy apoyada por la plataforma software de Inteligencia Artificial ALEKS de McGraw-Hill Education.

Este caso ha sido señalado tanto por Clark  (February  19, 2016) en sus post de plan B que hacen un extracto de su informe, como por el informe de la CRUE  (Delgado et al, 2017)).

Las conclusiones son que la IA en general, y los sistemas de aprendizaje adaptativo en particular, tendrán un enorme efecto a largo plazo en la mejora de la calidad de la enseñanza demostrada en los logros, en la eficiencia del aprendizaje, el rendimiento del alumno y el descenso del abandono escolar.

Esto fue confirmado por los resultados de los cursos realizados en la Universidad Estatal de Arizona en otoño de 2015 presentados en Educause Learning Initiative en San Antonio en febrero de 2016. Los datos y gráficos están obtenidos de Donald Clark (February  19, 2016)

La referencia es el curso, Biology 100 (BIO100)[1], en modalidad de blended learning En él se hizo el informe. Se llevó a cabo en la  plataforma CogBooks[2] . Está descrito por Clark (February  19, 2016): Las actividades las llevaron a cabo en la plataforma y luego el trabajo grupal y las dudas se llevaron a clase en modalidad flipped classroom.

El informe se centra en los objetivos del curso, como experimento de sistema de enseñanza mejorado con tecnología:

  • aumentar el logro
  • reducir las tasas de deserción escolar
  • mantener la motivación del estudiante
  • aumentar la efectividad docente

Respecto del primero, mejorar los resultados del aprendizaje esta gráfica con expresión del tamaño de la muestra es elocuente:

Fig. 12

Respecto del abandono

Fig. 13

Se reduce en la misma institución en un dos por ciento. Pero esto no es lo importante, lo importante es comparar con esta modalidad de enseñanza en estudios similares que en EE UU está entre el 41% y el 45% de los que se matriculan en universidades estadounidenses. Lo cual es dramático si consideramos que después tienen que hacer frente a la deuda, que en estos tipos de estudiantes es en EE UU de 1,3 millones de dólares y el hecho de que estos estudiantes abandonaron, pero todavía cargan con la carga de esa deuda, este es un nivel catastrófico de fracaso. En el Reino Unido la tasa de abandono es de  16%.

Los tableros de los profesores no son muy distintos de los que hemos utilizado en Open Education,  y que hemos descrito en un post anterior:

Fig. 14

Diferentes paneles de control brindan información, en tiempo real, del rendimiento de los estudiantes. Esto le permite al instructor ayudar a los necesitados.

La realidad es que según Clark el sistema promete en este punto una mejora continua, “muy necesaria en educación”. No ofrece evidencias de una aportación concreta de la IA: “ Podríamos mirar un enfoque que no solo mejore el desempeño de los docentes sino también el del sistema en sí, con la consecuencia de una mejora continua en el rendimiento, la deserción y la motivación en los estudiantes”.

No estamos muy por los selft report studies. Como bien hemos justificdo en otras ocasiones no son un elemento significativo del rendimiento del aprendizaje ni de la calidad de la docencia. En este caso el informe dice “que los estudiantes quieren más”

Fig. 15

Más del 80% de los estudiantes en esta primera experiencia de un curso adaptativo, dijeron que querían utilizar este enfoque en otros módulos y cursos.

Sin embargo no hemos obtenido una información técnica (sobre la metodología docente y de apoyo al alumno) detallada. Tampoco nos la ha dado Clark.

Lo más aproximado es la información que da la propia plataforma CogBook en pantallas como ésta:

Fig. 16

Lo más aproximado es la descripción que hace Clark (February  19, 2016) en el párrafo siguiente:

“Una de las dificultades en los sistemas adaptables, impulsados ​​por AI, es la creación de contenido utilizable. Por contenido, me refiero a materiales de aprendizaje, estructuras, elementos de evaluación, etc. CogBooks ha creado un conjunto de herramientas que permiten a los instructores crear una red de contenido, trabajando desde objetivos. También se usa la ayuda automática con el diseño y con la conversión de contenidos. Una vez hecho esto, se crea una red compleja de contenido de aprendizaje a través de la cual los estudiantes circulan, cada estudiante mediante un camino diferente, dependiendo de su rendimiento continuo. El sistema es como un satélite, siempre trata de llevar a los estudiantes a su destino, incluso cuando se salen de curso.”

También el propio Clark (JANUARY 13, 2016) ha descrito una taxonomía para los sistemas AI adaptativos (sistemas inteligentes) de apoyo al aprendizaje en base a la asistencia con  cinco niveles:

Nivel 1: Tecnológico

Nivel 2: Asistido

Nivel 3: Analítico

Nivel 4: Híbrido

Nivel 5: Autónomo

Él sitúa la experiencia de CogBook en BIO100 en el nivel 4, sistema adaptativo híbrido, con mezcla de ayuda humana y de detección y de recomendación. Algo que guarda ciertas similitudes con lo que hemos descrito para el análisis de la relevancia en las contribuciones de los foros en el curso “El diseño intruccional de la Universidad de Alcalá. Que actualmente estaría en el límite entre 3 y 4.

Otras experiencias reales.-

Otras experiencias actuales que hemos examinado, rastreando los enlaces de una presentación hecha a la CRUE para justificar el  Informe Tendencias TIC 2018 (Delgado et al, 2017) han sido las dos siguientes:

AI en educación – The Genie of Deakin University.- En la universidad Deakin[3], en Victoria, Australia, se ha estado experimentando con la plataforma Watson durante bastante tiempo con el fin de servir a sus alumnos de una manera más personalizada. Desde 2015, los estudiantes han podido pedir consejo a Deakin Genie, con sede en Watson, sobre una amplia variedad de temas.

Jill Watson: la primera asistente de enseñanza de IA de Georgia Tech[4]

El equipo dirigido porGoel y Polepeddi, L. (2016) ha trabajado sobre el uso de sistemas basados en herramientas de respuesta y recomendación para responder a las preguntas de los estudiantes en los foros de su clase en línea de Inteligencia Artificial basada en el Conocimiento (KBAI).

La asistente ha sido nombrada Jill Watson, se basó en la plataforma Watson de IBM, que es quizás mejor conocida como la computadora que venció a dos campeones de Jeopardy. Jill se desarrolló específicamente para manejar la gran cantidad de publicaciones en el foro por parte de los estudiantes inscriptos en un curso en línea que es un requisito para obtener el título de maestría en ciencias en el programa de informática de Georgia Tech.

Cabría un último apartado a lo anteriormente desarrollado. Se trata de las experiencias, o de las prácticas consolidadas, de docencia universitaria en línea que, de forma oficial y estructurada por un diseño instruccional adecuado, se desarrollasen en entornos sociales, con el aporte de las affordances provistas por redes sociales y con tecnología móvil.

Sin embargo, a partir de lo desarrollado en el  apartado cuarto de este trabajo no sabemos dónde empiezan los datos de las experiencias y donde las propuestas de alternativas a los LMS. Es decir, a lo que ahora constituyen prácticas muy diversas y, cada ve más menguadas desde el punto de vista de la docencia pedagógica, cuyo desarrollo está soportado en los LMS.

En este post vamos a enlazar ambas cosas.

Podemos decir que hasta aquí hemos aportado, de una forma no exhaustiva y a grosso modo, los datos que contribuyen a dibujar los rasgos generales de una situación. Ahora correspondería hablar de las conjeturas sobre lo que va a pasar o ya está empezando a suceder..

La cuestión, en todo caso, es:

¿Qué utilizan las universidades que no utilizan los LMS, o las que no los utilizan preferentemente, como base para la docencia virtual? Y sobre todo ¿cómo organizan esa docencia virtual?

Hemos hablado del desarrollo de las disrupciones universitarias como realidad emergente perfectamente consolidada y que avanza en su implantación, pero que ahora solo afecta a un número cada vez más importante de universidades de excelencia en los países más desarrollados y con corporaciones que son vanguardia y base en la transformación digital. También hemos hablado de la universidad inteligente, alternativa que aún es mucho más restringida y selectiva como espacio de desarrollo que sustituya a los LMS. ¿Cuál sería pues la práctica más extendida, cotidiana y aceptada por los usuarios, los alumnos y los profesores, de lo que se hace de forma tan heterogénea en los LMS? La realidad de nuestro entorno, y de lo que es más probable que sea aceptado masivamente de forma consuetudinaria, son las herramientas y entornos sociales, que aprovechan las posibilidades de la tecnología móvil.

En lo que sigue veremos ambas cosas.

Así pues, uno de los sustitutos de los LMS, y seguramente el que ya esté ganando terreno de forma más inadvertida pero más  constante, puede ser el complejo formado por la web social y la nube. En sus diversas y más conocidas modalidades, pero en combinación intima e indiferenciada con los repositorios institucionales y los complejos editoriales científicos.

Como ejemplos muy significativos podemos poner la experiencia de Lévy y otras reseñadas en RED, particularmente en el monográfico «Web social y sistemas inteligentes de gestión de aprendizaje en Educación Superior

Pierre Lévy, historiador, filósofo y sociólogo es miembro de la Academia de Ciencias de Canadá y director de la Cátedra de Investigación en Inteligencia Colectiva en la Universidad de Ottawa, es mundialmente reconocido como «filósofo del ciberespacio», pionero en el estudio y en aportaciones sobre el desarrollo y las implicaciones de la inteligencia colectiva en la sociedad a través de un medio como Internet. Es reconocido, además, como uno de los más grandes estudiosos de la cultura virtual. Autor, entre otras, de obras como: La machine univers (1987), La ideografía dinámica (1991), Las tecnologías de la inteligencia (1994), ¿Qué es lo virtual? (1995), Cibercultura (1997), Ciberdemocracia . (2004), Inteligencia Colectiva (2010), creador de un metalenguaje digital, llamado IEML (Information Economy Meta Language)…. 


Pero sobre todo es profesor de la Université d’Otawa. Y en su docencia utiliza redes sociales. Dice (Lévy, 2018):

En las clases que imparto en la Universidad de Ottawa, pido a mis estudiantes que participen en un grupo de Facebook cerrado, que se registren en Twitter, que abran un blog, si no tienen ya uno, y que utilicen una plataforma de curación colaborativa de datos como Scoop.it, Diigo o Pocket.

El uso de plataformas de curación de contenidos me sirve para enseñar a los estudiantes cómo elegir categorías o etiquetas (tags) para clasificar las informaciones útiles para almacenarlos y rescatarlos a largo plazo, con el fin de encontrarlas fácilmente a partir del mismo momento que hacen la curación. Esta competencia les será muy útil en el resto de su carrera.

Los blogs son utilizados como soportes del «trabajo final» para las asignaturas de Grado (es decir, anteriores al máster), los blogs son también utilizados como cuadernos de investigación para los estudiantes de máster o de doctorado, donde hacen anotaciones sobre las lecturas, formulaciones de hipótesis, recopilaciones de datos, los borradores de artículos científicos, de capítulos de memorias, de tesis, etc. El blog de investigación público facilita la relación con el supervisor y permite reorientar a tiempo las direcciones de investigaciones arriesgadas, entrar en contacto con los equipos que están trabajando en los mismos temas, etc.

El grupo de Facebook es utilizado para compartir el Syllabus o «plan de la unidad didáctica», la agenda de clase, las lecturas obligatorias, las discusiones internas de grupos – por ejemplo, las relativas a la evaluación – así como las direcciones de correo electrónico de los estudiantes (Twitter, blog, plataforma de curación social, etc.). Todas estas informaciones están en línea y accesibles con un solo clic, incluyendo las lecturas obligatorias. Los estudiantes pueden participar en la escritura de mini-wikis dentro del grupo de Facebook sobre temas de su elección, se les invita a sugerir lecturas interesantes relacionadas con el tema del curso añadiendo enlaces comentados. Yo uso Facebook, porque la casi-totalidad de los estudiantes ya está suscrito a él y porque la funcionalidad de grupo de la plataforma está muy rodada. Pero hubiera podido utilizar cualquier otro soporte colaborativo de gestión de grupos, como Slack o los grupos de Linkedin

En su testimonio podemos rastrear estrategias de enseñanza muy variadas, y que no caben incluirlas en metodologías estándares o con etiquetas de ningún tipo, y mucho menos se podría incluir en la estructura estereotipada de los LMS que van quedando tan lejos de los intereses de los estudiantes y de su práctica diaria (es como si dijéramos que para ir la universidad a aprender utilizaran caminos y coches creados exprofeso para ir a la universidad a aprender, distintos de los que utilizan para ir a otro sitios, o a la misma universidad pero con otros fines). Hay técnicas y estrategias de curación, metacognición, trabajo colaborativo, … Así dice:

Reflexionando sobre mi práctica docente desde una decena de años, me doy cuenta que descansa en un modelo de aprendizaje colaborativo de tres fases: 1) una práctica común, 2) un diálogo sobre esta práctica, 3) una reflexión colectiva que emerge del diálogo y que enriquece la práctica a cambio.

Y, por último, en su línea de trabajo, hace una proyección vinculando inteligencia colectiva como contexto y aseguración de aprendizaje y blockchain:

Supongamos ahora que en lugar de representar los conocimientos adquiridos por medio de un diploma o de un crédito (el coste de un curso y la nota obtenida), se los representa por un registro de todas las transacciones pedagógicas públicas en las que ha participado un estudiante: prácticas, diálogos, obras que atestiguan las competencias y el pensamiento desarrollados (Grech y Camilleri, 2017). Lo que estaría registrado y autenticado no sería más que un breve documento estático y relativamente opaco – como hoy – pero una ventana sobre el aprendizaje colaborativo vivo donde el profesor y los estudiantes son testigos mutuos. La garantía de los aprendizajes individuales ya no estaría separada de los procesos de inteligencia colectiva, donde los saberes han emergido y donde han tomado sentido. Independientemente de los cambios institucionales y culturales que ello implica, tales cambios en el reconocimiento de los saberes serían técnicamente posibles hoy en día. Los blockchains son registros informatizados que contienen el histórico de todos los cambios y las transacciones efectuadas entre los usuarios desde su creación. Estas bases de datos están aseguradas por un proceso criptográfico y compartidas por sus diferentes usuarios sin intermediario.

Pero no hace falta ir tan lejos, geográfica ni conceptualmente, como en los apartados 4 y 5, o en el de Lévy, para obtener casos claros, relevantes en integrados en programas oficiales de grado. A continuación, ofrecemos algunos de ellos en contextos próximos de integración viable y eficiente de entornos y redes sociales en procesos de docencia universitaria reglada.

El primero de ellos es en los Grados en Administración y Dirección de Empresas y Marketing de la Universidad de Murcia durante tres cursos académicos (Faura-Martínez, Martín-Castejón y Lafuente-Lechuga, 2017).En el trabajo se ponen de relieve algunos rasgos y aspectos del uso de Whatsapp

En el funcionamiento de una comunidad de aprendizaje y el trabajo colaborativo en un grupo de Whatsapp:

El uso del WhatsApp nos facilita el  intercambio  rápido  e  instantáneo  mediante  texto, imágenes o videos, de lo que va sucediendo a lo largo de las situaciones. Sirve de gran ayuda, ya que nos permite  realizar  el  seguimiento,  así  como  compartir  ideas   y sugerencias de mejora sobre las tareas que se han de realizar

La tutorización en la Elaboración del TFG  de forma interdisciplinar:

otro método de  comunicación utilizado  en  la  tutorización ha  sido la  creación  de  un  grupo  de  Whatsapp  a  través  del  cual los  estudiantes  intentan  resolver  de  forma  conjunta  las  dudas  planteadas  en la  elaboración de sus trabajos y en caso de no tener claro la solución del problema, se trasladan éstas a los tutores

En las conclusiones:

la aplicación WhatsApp [utilizada adecuadamente]  fomenta la investigación y el autoaprendizaje en el estudiante

Por lo demás frecuentemente nos encontramos artículos y ponencias en los que se comunican experiencias de uso docente de los medios sociales y conclusiones sobre metodología, evaluación, ambientes y estrategias de uso, así como análisis de aumento de la eficiencia de ciertos aprendizajes específicos como es el caso de Suárez Lantarón (2017).

Pero si bien se han desarrollado en estudios oficiales estas experiencias, siempre han sido aisladas y sin la naturaleza formal e integrado en el curriculum  que proporciona un diseño instruccional que relacione estas actividades con el resto y con objetivos, evaluación y otras estrategias docentes. En definitiva han sido experiencias aisladas en el contexto académico e incluso en el contexto docente del propio profesor.

Tampoco responden a la pregunta de esta serie de post ¿qué sustituye a los LMS en la docencia virtual universitaria?

El caso siguiente es paradigmático en estos dos sentidos, es una alternativa en estudios formales de alternativa al LMS convencional con grupos Facebook: Using the Facebook group as a learning management system: An exploratory study (Wang et al, 2012). No es frecuente que caiga en este tipo de detalles, pero no puedo evitar decir que ete trabajo es, cóm no, dde Singapur y equ tienen el día de la fecha 632 citas. De las cuales cinco han sido en el tiempo que estoy escribiendo este post.

Según se asegura en el paper (Wang et al, 2012).    ), en este estudio, el grupo de Facebook se usó como un sistema de gestión de aprendizaje (LMS) en dos cursos. Las funciones que en él se realizaron fueron: publicar anuncios, compartir recursos, organizar tutoriales semanales y llevar a cabo discusiones en línea en un instituto de formación docente en Singapur. 

Este estudio explora pues el uso del grupo de Facebook como LMS, también como investigación añadida estudia las percepciones de los estudiantes que utilizan esta modalidad en sus asignaturas. Los resultados mostraron que los estudiantes estaban básicamente satisfechos con los beneficios de la sustitución del LMS convencional por Facebook, ya que las funciones fundamentales de un LMS se podían implementar fácilmente en un grupo de Facebook, con la ventaja de que el entorno le era muy familiar. 

Como no puede ser de otra forma en un análisis de este tipo también se concluían algunas limitaciones de un grupo Facebook como LMS. Por ejemplo   no admite cargar (compartir en el muro) directamente archivos de otros formatos que no sean fotos o vídeos y que la discusión no está organizada en una estructura de hilos. 

También se concluye que los estudiantes no se sienten seguros y cómodos ya que su privacidad podría ser revelada para profesores y para compañeros no siempre con el grado de confianza que ya tenían en Facebook. 

En el mismo trabajo se hace una discusión que sería prolija y rebasa el propósito de este post donde se tratan las restricciones que habría que imponer para usar grupos de Facebook como LMS, y las implicaciones para la práctica.

En lo que sigue hacemos una transcripción y adaptación del resumen de las conclusiones que hacen los autores con acotaciones propias.

El documento, además de una sustancial cantidad de referencias, aporta una base consistente sobre:

Lo que ya se sabe sobre este tema.

  • Facebook ha sido utilizado popularmente de forma habitual por estudiantes universitarios, pero lo más frecuente es que no quieren que sus profeores sean “amigos en Facebook.
  • La presencia como tal del profesor en Facebook puede cambiar el ambiente en el aula, su credibilidad y la relación con los alumnos y entre ellos.
  • Los sistemas de gestión de aprendizaje comerciales (LMS) tienen limitaciones que supera Facebook.

 

Lo que agrega este artículo a lo que se sabia sobre el tema en ese momento:

  • El grupo de Facebook puede utilizarse como un LMS sin problemas.Tiene suficientes recursos pedagógicos, sociales y tecnológicos que así lo avalan (esta conclusión es muy importante para permitir a las instituciones tomar la decisión de que se así se utilice).
  • Los estudiantes manifiestan satisfacción con la forma de estar y de usar grupo de Facebook como LMS (no confundir con la mejora y la eficiencia para conseguir más y mejores aprendizajes, esa es otra cuestión que depende de muchos y más complejos factores. El trabajo no aporta evidencias en un sentido ni en el contrario)
  • Los estudiantes más jóvenes son más permeables y aceptan mejor la idea de usar los grupos de Facebook como LMS
  • También es cierto que el uso de los grupos de Facebook como LMS tiene limitaciones: no admite directamente el uso de otros formatos de archivos que no sean los previstos de imágenes y vídeos; sus discusiones no están organizadas en hilos; Y no se percibe como un entorno seguro. Pero todo esto es salvable si se combina su uso con repositorios institucionales y enlaces a ellos.

Implicaciones para la práctica y/o la política universitaria:

  • El grupo de Facebook puede usarse como sustituto o suplemento de LMS.
  • Se necesitan aplicaciones terceras, o supletorias, para ampliar la capacidad del grupo de Facebook como un LMS. Se podría asegurar [esto es nuestro] que bastaría el señalado repositorio institucional; y la nube, para organizar espacios para los alumnos y portfolios.
  • Usar Facebook parece ser más apropiado para jóvenes que para adultos.
  • Los profesores no tienen que adoptar el rol de amigos de los estudiantes en Facebook en el grupo, ni ser amigos en Facebook.

Podemos decir que hasta aquí y en clave informal de post, hemos aportado, de una forma no exhaustiva y a grosso modo algunos datos sobre  casos que pueden contribuir a dibujar los rasgos generales de la situación de las redes sociales como sustitutas de los LMS.

Al principio hemos preguntado:

¿Qué utilizan las universidades que no utilizan los LMS o las que no los utilizan preferentemente, como base para la docencia virtual? Y sobre todo ¿cómo organizan esa docencia virtual?

Una parte de la respuesta a esa pregunta es: El complejo formado por la web social y la nube, sería en su caso una parte de la hipótesis principal a investigar.

La otra sería investigar qué parte de esa franja ocupan las opciones emergentes disruptivas. Es decir las que han aparecido como evolución de los MOOC y de otras disrupciones, así como las opciones, hoy por hoy muy minoritarias, constituido por las opciones universitarias que en alguna medida utilicen entornos inclusivos en sus distintas modalidades, incluyendo en ellos los propios entornos adaptativos (personalizados tradicionales), los entornos sensibles de contexto y los entornos inteligentes de aprendizaje.

Pero volvamos al tema central de esta parte: Las herramientas y entornos sociales como sustitutivos de los LMS. Cuentión que podríamos abrir a otra más general: Los entornos sociales como ambientes y affordances de aprendizaje en la educación superior.

En ese marco cabría preguntarse qué hacen los que tienen las competencia de  organizar la docencia universitaria y de habilitar los medios, en este caso decisivos, para que la tecnología sea una u otra la que facilite la docencia virtual, la formación de los profesores y de los estímulos para que sean unas u otras la tecnologías y las metodologías docentes asociadas, mas allá de las iniciativas individuales o de grupos de profesores o de investigadores en docencia y aprendizaje en la universidad.

Hasta septiembre de 2015 no aparece ninguna referencia de las redes sociales en los documentos y en las políticas educativas de la CRUE como algo relacionado con la educación. Las redes sociales se consideran como algo exclusivamente vinculado con la imagen corporativa y el marketing universitario.

Así lo pongo de relieve en una pregunta y observación a la intervención del coordinador de la CRUE, Dr. Segundo Piriz, en las jornadas de la UIMP de ese año en Santander. Ver el vídeo siguiente a partir del minuto 41:00

Hasta diciembre de 2014 no ha aparecido en los informes UNIVERSITIC, ni en ningún otro documento oficial de la CRUE, ninguna mención, en ningún sentido, a la web social. En la edición de 2014 del informe UNIVERSITIC aparecen dos líneas y media y solo para hablar de ellas como medio de imagen corporativa.

Contrasta con el interés y el papel destacado que la CRUE otorga a la docencia con TIC. Así lo hace en la introducción y en el capitulo primero , el de los indicadores, donde literalmente se dice que (CRUE, 2014 p 14): 

En el papel de las TI como promotoras de la docencia no presencial, podemos resaltar que el 91% del profesorado y el 95% de los estudiantes utilizan la plataforma de docencia virtual institucional y el número de titulaciones no presenciales ofertadas por las universidades españolas participantes en el estudio alcanza la cifra 360, lo que supone alrededor del 7% de las titulaciones que ofertan. En cuanto al número de titulaciones no presenciales ofertadas, se observa un crecimiento considerable respecto del año anterior (del 11,0% en términos absolutos y del 17,8% en términos relativos).


Lo cual abunda en la idea subyacente al principio y en todo este trabajo sobre una realidad que existe, y es la idea predominante en la universidad de identificar docencia virtual, o docencia con medios tecnológicos, con uso de los LMS.

 

 Este post está incluido dentro del articulo cuya referencia es la que sigue. Si lo necesita puede citarlo de esta forma:

Zapata-Ros, M. (Julio 2019). Por qué las universidades empiezan a no utilizar los campus virtuales (los LMS) de forma relevante ¿Cómo y por qué sistemas están siendo sustituidos? Preprint. Researchgate – Proyecto Disrupciones en educación superior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.21039.69286. 

[1] “El otro hecho constatado es el cambio sobre su línea inicial de ausencia de diseño instrucional, o si lo queremos el avance desde situaciones casi de espontaneismo pedagógico explícito, defendido en los primitivos cMOOC por los autores (…), hasta y hacia modelos de diseño instruccional cada vez más apoyados en los avances de la moderna pedagogía, de las teorías del aprendizaje, de los modelos sobre cómo se aprende, se evalúan los aprendizajes y cada vez más apoyado también en el diseño instruccional (Weller, 2013). Tendencia que Coursera pone de manifiesto en su guía Building a Coursera Course (CIT, 2013), un manual ortodoxo sobre diseño instruccional, secuenciación, elaboración de guías didácticas, etc. y también en su apuesta por el método de tutoría, evaluación y docencia Mastering learning (Brandman, 2013).”

Referencias

Christensen, C. M. (2012). Disruptive innovation. Consultado el 29/05/2014 En Accedido en http://www.christenseninstitute.org/key-concepts/disruptive-innovation-2/   el 01/08/14.

Christensen, C. M. (2013). The innovator’s dilemma: when new technologies

cause great firms to fail. Harvard Business Review Press

CIT (Center for Intructional Technologie) (2013) Building a Coursera Course Version 2.0 https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ST44i6fjoaRHvs5IWYXqJbiI31muJii_iqeJ_y1pxG0/edit?pli=1

CIT (Center for Intructional Technologie) (2013) Building a Coursera Course Version 2.0 https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ST44i6fjoaRHvs5IWYXqJbiI31muJii_iqeJ_y1pxG0/edit?pli=1

Clark, D. (February  19, 2016) 10 powerful results from Adaptive (AI) learning trial at ASU. Plan Bhttp://donaldclarkplanb.blogspot.com.es/2016/02/10-powerful-results-from-adaptive-ai.html

Clark, D. (JANUARY 13, 2016). 5 level taxonomy of AI in learning (with real examples). Plan B. http://donaldclarkplanb.blogspot.com.es/search?q=ai+taxonomy

CRUE, T. (2014). UNIVERSITIC 2014: Descripción, Gestión y Gobierno de las TI en el Sistema Universitario Español. In Madrid, España: Conferencia de Rectores de las Universidades Españolas (CRUE). https://www.crue.org/Documentos%20compartidos/Publicaciones/Universitic/Universitic_2014.pdf

Delgado, C. et al (2017) Informe Tendencias TIC . Publicaciones de la CRUEhttp://tic.crue.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/9.50-Sesion-Tecnica-CRUE-TIC-GTDIR-Tendencias-UCM-2017v1.pdf

Faura-Martínez, U., Martín-Castejón, P.J. y Lafuente-Lechuga, M. (2017). Un modelo conceptual para la realización del Trabajo Fin de Grado apoyado en el uso de las TICs. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, 53. Consultado el (dd/mm/aaaa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/red/53/

Fink, L.D. (2003), A Self-Directed Guide to Designing Courses for Significant Learning. http://www.deefinkandassociates.com/GuidetoCourseDesignAug05.pdf

Goel, A. K., & Polepeddi, L. (2016). Jill Watson: A Virtual Teaching Assistant for Online Education. Georgia Institute of Technology. https://smartech.gatech.edu/bitstream/handle/1853/59104/goelpolepeddi-harvardvolume-v7.1.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

Grech, A. and Camilleri, A. F. (2017). Blockchain in Education. Inamorato dos Santos, A.(ed.) EUR 28778 EN; doi:10.2760/60649 https://www.crue.org/Documentos%20compartidos/Publicaciones/Universitic/Universitic_2014.pdf

Lévy, P. (2018). Cómo utilizo la web social en mis clases de la universidad. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, 57. Consultado el (dd/mm/aaaa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/57/levy_es.pdf  DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/red/57/1

Merrill, M. D. (2002). First principles of instruction. Educational technology research and development, 50(3), 43-59. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02505024 y https://mdavidmerrill.com/Papers/firstprinciplesbymerrill.pdf

Merrill, M. D. (2002). First principles of instruction. Educational technology research and development, 50(3), 43-59. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02505024 y https://mdavidmerrill.com/Papers/firstprinciplesbymerrill.pdf

Merrill, M. D. (2007). First principles of instruction: A synthesis. In R. A. Reiser & J. V. Dempsey (Eds.), Trends and issues in instructional design and technology (2nd ed., pp. 62-71). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice-Hall.

Merrill, M. D. (2009). First principles of instruction. In C. M. Reigeluth & A. A. Carr-Chellman (Eds.), Instructional-design theories and models: Building a common knowledge base (Vol. III, pp. 41-56). New York: Routledge.

Píriz, S. (2015). Vídeo en l seminario de la UIMP SMART UNIVERSITY 4.0: LA REALIDAD CUÁNTICA DE LA UNIVERSIDAD DEL FUTURO. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=Q45pYGkSBPY

Reigeluth, C. M. (1999). What is instructional-design theory and how is it changing. Instructional-design theories and models: A new paradigm of instructional theory2, 5-29.

Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional-design theories and models: A new paradigm of instructional theory (Vol. II, pp. 5-29). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Seaman, J. E., Allen, I. E., & Seaman, J. (2018). Grade Increase: Tracking Distance Education in the United States. Babson Survey Research Group. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED580852.pdf

Shah (December 2016) MOOC Trends in 2016: College Credit, Credentials, and Degrees: https://www.classcentral.com/report/mooc-trends-credit-credentials-degrees/

Suárez Lantarón, B. (2017). El WhatsApp como herramienta de apoyo a la tutoría. REDU. Revista de Docencia Universitaria15(2), 193-210.

Wang, Q., Woo, H. L., Quek, C. L., Yang, Y., & Liu, M. (2012). Using the Facebook group as a learning management system: An exploratory study. British Journal of Educational Technology43(3), 428-438. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2011.01195.x

Zapata-Ros, M. (2013). Enseñanza Universitaria en línea, MOOC y aprendizaje divergente. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/235955610_Ensenanza_Universitaria_en_linea_MOOC_y_aprendizaje_divergente

Zapata-Ros, M. (2013). Los MOOCs, génesis, evolución y alternativa. Génesis (I). La crisis de la universidad como legitimadora social del  . https://red.hypotheses.org/505

Zapata-Ros, M. (Agosto 2013). El diseño instruccional de los MOOCs y el de los nuevos cursos online abiertos personalizados (POOCs). http://eprints.rclis.org/19744/

Zapata-Ros, M. (2013). Enseñanza Universitaria en línea, MOOC y aprendizaje divergente. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/235955610_Ensenanza_Universitaria_en_linea_MOOC_y_aprendizaje_divergente

Zapata-Ros, M. (5 sep. 2014). Los MOOC en la crisis de la Educación Universitaria.: Docencia, diseño y aprendizaje. https://www.amazon.es/Los-MOOC-crisis-Educaci%C3%B3n-Universitaria/dp/1500607932/ref=sr_1_3

Zapata-Ros, M. (Sept 2014). http://scholar.google.es/scholar_url?url=https://revistas.um.es/red/article/download/236611/180881&hl=es&sa=X&scisig=AAGBfm1PZKzQsXmioSmJv7TFDBbnBy7w7g&nossl=1&oi=scholarr

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). El diseño instruccional de los MOOC y el de los nuevos cursos abiertos personalizados. Revista de Educación a Distancia, (45). https://revistas.um.es/red/article/view/238661

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). El diseño instruccional de los MOOC y el de los nuevos cursos abiertos personalizados. Revista de Educación a Distancia, (45). https://revistas.um.es/red/article/view/238661

Zapata-Ros, M. (2017). Latinoamérica y la educación superior en la encrucijada de la Sociedad del Conocimiento. Desafíos y disrupciones. OSF.IO. https://osf.io/preprints/f8e39/  DOI 10.31219/osf.io/f8e39

Zapara-Ros, M. (Enero 2018). Gestión del aprendizaje y web social en la educación superior en línea. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, 57(7). Consultado el (dd/mm/aaaa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/57/zapata.pdf DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/red/57/7

Zapata-Ros, M. (Enero 2018b). La universidad inteligente. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, 57(10). Consultado el (dd/mm/aaaa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/57/zapata2.pdf DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/red/57/10

Zapata-Ros, M. (2018 July 2). Latinoamérica y la educación superior en la encrucijada de la Sociedad del Conocimiento. Desafíos y disrupciones. OSF.IO. https://osf.io/preprints/f8e39/  DOI 10.31219/osf.io/f8e39

Zapata-Ros, M. (Diciembre 2018). Pensamiento computacional en los primeros ciclos educativos, un pensamiento computacional desenchufado (I) https://red.hypotheses.org/1508

 

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159). Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria. Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York. Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

Por qué las universidades empiezan a no utilizar los campus virtuales tradicionales (los LMS) de forma relevante. ¿Cómo están siendo sustituidos? (I)

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Murcia
ISSN 2386-8562

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.21039.69286.

Este artículo está bajo una licencia de Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0

Debe ser citado como:

Zapata-Ros, M. (Julio 2019). Por qué las universidades empiezan a no utilizar los campus virtuales (los LMS) de forma relevante ¿Cómo y por qué sistemas están siendo sustituidos? Preprint. Researchgate – Proyecto Disrupciones en educación superior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.21039.69286.

Durante los últimos veinte años decir universidad virtual, teleformación, enseñanza universitaria online, elearning universitario o incluso Educación a Distancia, ha sido equivalente a decir Learning Management Systems (LMS). Esta identificación se ha producido por la práctica, pero también por la decidida política oficial universitaria de apostar de forma estandarizada por estos sistemas.

Todas las universidades han tenido un equipo o un departamento técnico encargado de mantener y elaborar los protocolos de acceso y uso de estas plataformas por los profesores y por sus alumnos, promoviendo su uso y orientando la política de adquisiciones y renovaciones en función las más de las veces de criterios computacionales o similares a los de otras políticas de gestión de recursos.

También ha habido una intensa labor de investigación y de desarrollo (visible en guías, normas y protocolos) sobre docencia y pedagogías asociadas a los LMS, y de prácticas de una cierta innovación educativa universitaria asociada a ellos. Durante todos estos años también ha habido una producción intensa de literatura sobre usos más eficientes, mejores metodologías docentes, evaluación en estos ambientes, y sobre otras modalidades de entornos asociaos o derivados de ellos (por ejemplo los personal learning envirnment PLE, o los MOOC). Destacan entre estos trabajos

Una de las definiciones más citada y más consensuda, ha sido la que proponíamos en 3003 (Zapata-Ros, 2003), que hasta el día de la fecha ha recogido 110 citas. Entonces decíamos:

“(…) [en lo siguiente, como definición] vamos a asumir lo que es común y mayoritariamente  aceptado  (el  mínimo  común  denominador)  en  los medios técnicos

Una plataforma de teleformación, o un sistema de gestión de aprendizaje en red [un LMS], es una herramienta informática y telemática organizada en función de unos objetivos formativos de forma integral [es decir que se puedan conseguir exclusivamente dentro de ella]  y  de  unos  principios  de  intervención  psicopedagógica  y  organizativos,  de manera que se cumplen los siguientes criterios básicos

Para a continuación enumerar esos criterios (hasta doce) entre los que destacamos como más importantes, conservando el estilo un poco naif de la época:

  • Posibilita el  acceso  remoto  tanto  a  profesores  como  a  alumnos  en  cualquier momento desde cualquier lugar con conexión a Internet o a redes con protocolo TCP/IP.
  • Utiliza un navegador. Permite a los usuarios acceder a la información a través de navegadores  estándares  (como  Nestscape,  Internet  Explorer,  Opera,..), utilizando el protocolo de comunicación  http.
  • El acceso es independiente de la plataforma o del ordenador personal de cada usuario. Es decir, utilizan estándares de manera que la información puede ser visualizada y tratada en las mismas condiciones, con las mismas funciones y con el mismo aspecto en cualquier ordenador.
  • El acceso es restringido y selectivo.
  • Incluye como elemento básico una interfaz gráfica común, con un único punto de   acceso, de   manera   que   en    ella   se   integran   los   diferentes   elementos hipermedia   que   constituyen   los   cursos:   texto, gráficos, vídeo,  sonidos, animaciones, etc.
  • Permite [al instructor] la actualización y la edición de la información con los medios propios que han de ser sencillos o con los medios  estándares  de  que  disponga  el usuario. Tanto de las páginas web como de los documentos depositados.
  • Permite [al instructor] estructurar la información y los espacios en formato hipertextual. De esta manera la información se puede organizar, estructurada a  través  de enlaces y    asociaciones  de  tipo  conceptual  y  funcional, de forma que  queden diferenciados distintos espacios y que esto sea percibible por los usuarios [alumnos].
  • Permita establecer diferentes niveles de  usuarios  con  distintos  privilegios  de acceso.  Debe  contemplar [de forma diferenciada o agrupados en perfiles] al  menos:  el  administrador,  que  se  encarga  del mantenimiento del servidor, y de administrar espacios, claves y privilegios; el coordinador o responsable de  curso,  es  el  perfil del profesor que diseña, y se responsabiliza  del   desarrollo   del   curso,   de   la   coordinación   docente   y organizativa del curso en la plataforma; los profesores tutores, encargados de la  atención  de  los  alumnos,  de   la   elaboración   de   materiales   y   de   la responsabilización docente de las materias; y los alumnos.

En cualquier caso se ha llegado a identificar lo que se hacía en el contexto de los LMS con la educación universitaria en red, de la nueva época digital, alternativa a la docencia universitaria tradicional o convencional.

Todos han dado por hecho que estos programas son consustanciales con los sistemas de educación en línea universitaria, están ahí como antes estaban los pupitres desde Fray Luis de León hasta hoy.  ¿Pero cuál es el estado actual de esta premisa y de los LMS? ¿Son inamovibles?

Estas son preguntas que quien suscribe se hace cada vez que tiene que preparar un taller, una conferencia o un curso, o en general ante el desafío que supone una intervención formativa para profesores universitarios o personal especializado, sobre docencia virtual. Siempre en el itinerario de cómo conseguir la transformación digital en el ámbito de la docencia universitaria. En estos casos el eje de la exposición siempre ha girado sobre diseño instruccional que es la forma de organizar la docencia en entornos complejos, con es el uso de la ayuda que prestan las tecnologías digitales y sus affordances asociadas, a objetivos y escenarios muy diversos y plurales entre ellos. No siempre son los mismos para todas las situaciones y escenarios.

En esos contextos, cuando tengo que preparar algo relacionado con enseñanza universitaria abierta y en línea, aprovecho para ver cómo sigue el estado del tema. Para ver cómo sigue la línea del tiempo de la educación abierta. Algo que empecé a hacer allá por febrero y marzo de 2015.

El motivo para este artículo lo ha proporcionado una intervención reciente,en junio de 2019, para el SOFD de la Universidad de Extremadura, en este caso, más que de innovación o de adopción temprana (early adoption) de sistemas completos, me centré en los sistemas predominantes que soportan y han soportado hasta ahora la enseñanza online: Los Learning Management Systems (LMS), las plataformas de teleformación que se decían antes, los campus virtuales que se dijeron después, o como quiera llamárseles. Como decía todos han dado por hecho que estos programas son consustanciales con los sistemas de educación en línea universitaria. Pero me planteaba la duda de si eso es así.

Y situado en esa tesitura, la de pensar si van a durar o no los LMS y cuales constiutirán como tendencia sus sustitutos o sus evoluciones, me planteaba es, si más que una tendencia, lo que hay ahora en presencia no es un simple cambio tecnológico, sino algo más y de otro orden.

No utilizaré la manida expresión de cambio de paradigma. Pero parece que hay algo que se ha alterado en el contexto en el que se desarrolla la enseñanza en línea. Algo que va más allá de lo puramente tecnológico. En definitiva, es pertinente cuestionarse y analizar si es algo que esté relacionado con elementos sociales y culturales del entorno. En esta línea de pensamiento es pertinente recordar, antes de comenzar el análisis en más detalle,  lo tratado en otras ocasiones sobre los cambios en docencia universitaria atribuidos a la presencia de los entornos sociales y ubicuos, la tecnología móvil y la adaptatividad inteligente, siempre dedes la perspectiva de mejorar los aprendizajes y de llegar mejor a más alumnos como perspectiva y horizongte de calidad. Para ello sería bueno que le lector revisase algunas de las cosas que hemos escrito sobre los cambios atribuidos al contexto social (entornos sociales de aprendizaje, ver esto y esto) y ubicuo (entornos ubicuos)… y aún más: allá el cambio hacia la nueva adaptatividad, la adaptatividad sensible de contexto y los entornos inteligentes de aprendizaje.

En esa situación, puestos en contexto y sin ideas distractivas, podemos abordar en clave de análisis lo que sucede ahora.

Así pues veamos qué está sucediendo en lo que percibimos como cambio. Cuáles son los indicios que nos hacen pensar así. Y ahora los exponemos en plan descriptivo, los enunciamos y después los explicamos con más detalle y en lo posible estableciendo conjeturas para el análisis:

  • Los MOOC han pasado a la historia (Gráficas 1 y 2). Nadie de los que tanto énfasis pusieron en su aparición y en las consecuencias que tendrían han reparado en ello. Como siempre, siguen la estrategia de “patada a seguir”, pasar a otra cosa sin analizar qué ha pasado con sus anteriores profecías.
  • La presencia y la actividad en los LMS han disminuido muy notablemente. Después abundaremos en esta idea y la justificaremos.
  • Se mantiene el índice de inscripción en los estudios universitarios convencionales, ahora ayudados con los medios digitales, pero de una forma auxiliar, sin notables cambios metodológicos, como pueda ser el uso de Moodle o de otras plataformas como medio de distribuir y entregar los contenidos, servir de tablón de anuncios y convocatorias, y poco más. Y también ha decaído el abandono de alumnos. Quizá antes subió por factores debidos a la crisis pasada, y ahora quizá suba por razones de promoción social en las zonas con alto índice de inmigración  como en otra época, en ,os años sesenta, sucedió para las clases menesterosas autóctonas. El caso es que este año la prueba de EBAU ha subido notablemente en el número de inscritos en las universidades públicas de la Región de Murcia. Habría que contrastar si este fenómeno se está produciendo igualmente en otros lugares con condiciones similares)
  • También sigue aumentando la inscripción y el uso de entornos online de enseñanza universitaria. (Figura 6)
  • Como aspecto central, veremos qué ha pasado con las disrupciones universitarias. Sosteníamos (Zapata-Ros, 2014) que los MOOC eran sólo la parte visible de un fenómeno de mucho más calado: las mismas o parecidas disrupciones que se producían en otros entornos y en otros sectores, pero que en este caso afectaban a la Universidad. Señalábamos igualmente que estas disrupciones pronto pasarían a ocupar el escenario, sustituyendo a los MOOC, de forma mucho más silenciosa pero mucho más eficaz, y señalábamos que eran básicamente tres: Los credentials, los micro-másters y los nanogrados. El espíritu que animaba estas innovaciones disruptivas era (y utilizo el pasado porque ya ha concluido en donde se produjeron la transición y estamos en plena época de expansión, como en 2012 lo estábamos de los MOOC): desposeer en aras de la sostenibilidad a los estudios universitarios de todo tipo de contenidos no estrictamente necesarios, de las grasas, decían, y dejarlos justamente con lo necesario para desarrollar con el dominio justo las habilidades que se estiman precisas para un desempeño profesional específico. Esto se hace en intima conexión entre las universidad que los organiza, la empresa patrocinadora y la plataforma titular de las disrupciones (EDX, Coursera, Udacity,…). Habitualmente las universidades que los organizan son de excelencia y las empresas son corporaciones tecnológicas  como Google, Amazon, Cisco,…pero el modelo es ya mucho más extendido.
  • Veremos qué pasa realmente con la otra gran opción emergente: los entornos inteligentes de enseñanza superior, las Smart Universities. Constatamos pues que la Universidad y su práctica docente no se ven libres de la IA y de su desarrollo práctico más importante (y quizá el único que se ha manifestado viable en la docencia y para el aprendizaje): los entornos inteligentes de aprendizaje, como evolución de los entornos adaptativos y de los entornos sensibles de contexto.

Empecemos pues con los hechos.

 

En en el apartado anterior adelantamos los cambios que hacen percibir que los LMS estén dejando de ser la referencia de la enseñanza en línea universitaria. Pasamos ahora a desarrollarlo.

 

1.

Los MOOC ya han pasado. Esta es una cuestión que veníamos anunciando desde 2013 cuando describíamos en marzo de 2013, en un preprint, y luego en la Revista de campus Virtuales, la naturaleza de este fenómeno como una innovación disruptiva en el sentido clásico que Christensen les atribuye. Y por último, el 16 de junio de 2014 ya decíamos claramente que los MOOC habían muerto, con gran escándalo por parte de algunos medios y expertos.

Hoy son un recuerdo, con un bagaje en informaciones y en menciones con relevancia apenas existente precisamente allí donde nacieron, en EE UU y en Canadá (nos referimos a los de escala: los xMOOC de la segunda generación, los que para muchos son los auténticos MOOC, no a los de la versión primigenia: los cMOOC, que esos se olvidaron antes). Nos referimos en definitiva a los cursos que organizaban, y aún organizan para países periféricos, EDX, Coursera, pero sobre todo UDACITY. Recientemente lo he explicado. Pero todo estaba claro entonces: Para qué iban a servir y el giro que iban a tomar. Lo primero lo expuso Christensen en una conferencia para los dirigentes de Harvard, EDX, Coursera y otros líderes del mundo disruptivo y de los MOOC y lo segundo lo declaró Sebastian Thrun en una entrevista para Fast Company que se hizo famosa.

Hoy la gráfica de tendencias de Google que siempre utilizamos tendría esta forma para el periodo 1-1-2011 a 30-05-2018

Gráfica 1

Que ampliada quedaría:

Gráfica 2

Podemos ver que el auge en EE UU y Canadá de los xMOOC se produce en 2012 (NYT le llama el año de los MOOC). Desde entonces decrece paulatinamente el interés. Por el contrario, es en 2013 y en años sucesivos cuando se produce un boom muy superior al de los sitios donde nacieron, en su mejor momento y mientras allí iba disminuyendo, en España el interés iba subiendo en mayor proporción que lo fue en su momento en Norteamérica. Hasta finales de 2016 donde con tres años de retraso se produce el mismo fenómeno de perdida de interés. La onda se reproduce ahora, con las mismas fases, en países como Ecuador, México, Perú, etc.

2.

El uso de las plataformas, de los LMS, de todos ellos sin exclusión, incluidos los de open source, está disminuyendo de forma muy notable.

Hay unos gráfico que, desde que aparecieron los LMS, se han hecho muy populares por su forma, son los GRÁFICOS DE CALAMAR (Squid Chart), por su aspecto singular tan parecida a la de ese cefalópodo. El gráfico señala en cada momento la distribución de mercado (usuarios, instituciones, etc.) por fracciones correspondientes a las distintas plataformas, que además a lo largo del tiemmpoa van cambiando de nombre y de titular, AGRUPÁNDOSE o absorbiéndose las unas a las otras. Esto es lo que produce ese aspecto de patas de calamares que se unen en la cabeza.

Cuadro de calamares de 2009:

Gráfica 3

Podemos ver cómo evolucionan las gráficas de calamar y la forma que tienen en el trabajo de  Michael Feldstein titulado “Reliability as a Service…”. En el artículo se habla de otras cosas, como más propio de CEOS de este sector y en su argot singular, y de cómo van los negocios entre Blackboard y Moodle y quién se apodera de quién.  Aparentemente, en este post, no se descubren más cosas.

Pero a los efectos de o que nos interesa, en este trabajo se puede apreciar la evolución de los gráficos de calamares desde 2019 a 2019. En el de 2009 de ve con claridad que, al final, en la parte de la derecha, los espacios dedicados a los calamares ocupan toda la franja sin espacios en blanco apenas entre ellos. Se vdistingue cómo, a lo largo del tiempo, se va progresando desde unas finas líneas correspondientes a las distintas plataformas, a trazos más gruesos y, más adelante, a la situación en la que, en total, al final las franjas ocupan todo el espacio disponible prácticamente.

En un abuso de comparación con el lenguaje cinéfilo, y parafraseando los nombres que QuentinTarantino utiliza para sus personajes en Reservoir Dogs, podemos decir que el Sr. Blanco es prácticamente inexistente ente al Sr. Gris (Web CT (Sr. Azul) + Blackboard = Blackboard), al Sr. Verde, al Sr. Naranja o al Sr. Marrón (casualmente Moodle) y al Sr. Celeste (Sakay).

Sin embargo, aunque al principio no, después y progresivamente, en las gráficas de los años siguientes, el Sr. Blanco se va apoderando del espacio que aparece en el margen derecho del cuadro, predominando respecto a los otros. Hasta que, en la gráfica de 2018 (hecha pública en enero de 2019), el cuadro de calamares hace que las cabezas enflaquezcan al máximo.

Y el Sr. Blanco es el predominante:

Gráfica 4

CON GRAN DIFERENCIA, EL COLOR BLANCO OCUPA TANTO ESPACIO COMO TODO EL RESTO de colores.

Hay casi tanta gente de la educación en línea que utiliza las plataformas LMS como fuera de ellas. Siendo que la educación en línea universitaria no cesa de crecer.

Pero no basta con el gráfico de calamares. Alguien podría poner en cuestión las escalas de la gráfica.

Sin embargo tenemos el detalle, que desarrolla sobre ello Phil Hill con palabras claras, en el artículo State of Higher Ed LMS Market for US and Canada: 2018 Year-End Edition, posteado el 5 de febrero pasado[1].

Primero disipa cualquier duda respecto de las escalas cuando habla de la metodología seguida para hacer los gráficos:

“veamos un gráfico actualizado de la cuota de mercado de LMS, comúnmente conocido como el gráfico de calamar, para la educación superior de Estados Unidos y Canadá. La idea original sigue siendo: ofrecer una imagen del mercado de LMS en una página, destacando la historia del mercado a lo largo del tiempo. La clave del gráfico es que el ancho de cada banda representa el porcentaje de instituciones [de entre las analizadas] que utilizan un LMS particular como su sistema principal.”

En el párrafo siguiente precisa el ámbito geográfico que toma como referencia para hacer los cálculos

“Con el lanzamiento de nuestro informe de fin de 2018 la semana pasada a los suscriptores, es hora de ver las actualizaciones en el mercado institucional de LMS para la educación superior en América del Norte (EE. UU. Y Canadá). Tenga en cuenta que nuestra cobertura para el análisis de mercado incluye Europa, América Latina, Oceanía (Australia, Nueva Zelanda y los países insulares circundantes), así como la cobertura emergente de Medio Oriente.”

De forma que:

“Presentamos los siguientes datos «por instituciones», con una participación de mercado como porcentaje del número total de instituciones que utilizan cada LMS como sistema primario , y «por inscripciones», en donde escalamos las instituciones por su inscripción total. Esto último capta mejor el negocio del mercado de LMS, ya que la mayoría de los acuerdos de licencia se basan en el número de estudiantes.”

Pues bien, en base a esto las conclusiones del gráfico son:

“hay dos tendencias interrelacionadas que merecen una explicación más amplia: el mercado de LMS se desaceleró con menos actividad en general, y Canvas y Blackboard continúan estando en el primer lugar de este mercado.”

Para lo que nos interesa nos centraremos en la primera parte de este párrafo, que el autor explica a continuación y en otro artículo con datos concluyentes:

“la desaceleración global en la actividad del mercado se constata en el número de LMS sometidos a evaluación formal desde mediados de 2018, con datos iniciales que apuntan a un 20 – 25% caída respecto al año anterior. Esta desaceleración parece constituir una meseta [ver figura 5, esta relación con el grafico la sugiere un servidor] en lugar de una tendencia continua, y estamos observando para ver si es temporal o no.”

Gráfica 5 https://i2.wp.com/eliterate.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/LMS-Market-Slowdown-1.png

Esto, como decimos, está ampliado en el artículo de Phil Hill  Academic LMS Market Slowdown, publicado el 24 de junio pasado:

“Lo que notamos en el verano de 2018 fue una caída bastante dramática en los datos a primer vista, particularmente en América del Norte. Con el tiempo, también notamos un cambio en los datos de los últimos 12 meses de las nuevas implementaciones (el total de los 12 meses anteriores para cada mes medido para suavizar la estacionalidad del mercado). Para los datos T12M de diciembre de 2018, que capturan el año calendario 2018 completo, la actividad de las nuevas implementaciones es aproximadamente un 20-25% menor que en el año anterior.”

Obviamente son datos que precisarían ser avalados en futuras mediciones para poder afirmar que es una tendencia. Pero de todas formas en los cuadros de calamares se visualiza el resultado actual si sumamos las áreas que ocupan las distintas opciones, y si lo miramos igual en cada gráfica observamos como progresan por un lado el espacio en blanco y por otro retrocede el espacio del resto de plataformas. Obviamente, de consolidarse la progresión entonces sí constituiría una tendencia.

 

 

[1] Ver también http://planetsakai.org/ el mejor de 2019 y  https://eliterate.us/the-ims-at-an-inflection-point/

Referencias

Christensen, C. M. (2012). Disruptive innovation. Consultado el 29/05/2014 En Accedido en http://www.christenseninstitute.org/key-concepts/disruptive-innovation-2/   el 01/08/14.

Christensen, C. M. (2013). The innovator’s dilemma: when new technologies

cause great firms to fail. Harvard Business Review Press

CIT (Center for Intructional Technologie) (2013) Building a Coursera Course Version 2.0 https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ST44i6fjoaRHvs5IWYXqJbiI31muJii_iqeJ_y1pxG0/edit?pli=1

CIT (Center for Intructional Technologie) (2013) Building a Coursera Course Version 2.0 https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ST44i6fjoaRHvs5IWYXqJbiI31muJii_iqeJ_y1pxG0/edit?pli=1

Clark, D. (February  19, 2016) 10 powerful results from Adaptive (AI) learning trial at ASU. Plan Bhttp://donaldclarkplanb.blogspot.com.es/2016/02/10-powerful-results-from-adaptive-ai.html

Clark, D. (JANUARY 13, 2016). 5 level taxonomy of AI in learning (with real examples). Plan B. http://donaldclarkplanb.blogspot.com.es/search?q=ai+taxonomy

CRUE, T. (2014). UNIVERSITIC 2014: Descripción, Gestión y Gobierno de las TI en el Sistema Universitario Español. In Madrid, España: Conferencia de Rectores de las Universidades Españolas (CRUE). https://www.crue.org/Documentos%20compartidos/Publicaciones/Universitic/Universitic_2014.pdf

Delgado, C. et al (2017) Informe Tendencias TIC . Publicaciones de la CRUEhttp://tic.crue.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/9.50-Sesion-Tecnica-CRUE-TIC-GTDIR-Tendencias-UCM-2017v1.pdf

Faura-Martínez, U., Martín-Castejón, P.J. y Lafuente-Lechuga, M. (2017). Un modelo conceptual para la realización del Trabajo Fin de Grado apoyado en el uso de las TICs. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, 53. Consultado el (dd/mm/aaaa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/red/53/

Fink, L.D. (2003), A Self-Directed Guide to Designing Courses for Significant Learning. http://www.deefinkandassociates.com/GuidetoCourseDesignAug05.pdf

Goel, A. K., & Polepeddi, L. (2016). Jill Watson: A Virtual Teaching Assistant for Online Education. Georgia Institute of Technology. https://smartech.gatech.edu/bitstream/handle/1853/59104/goelpolepeddi-harvardvolume-v7.1.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

Grech, A. and Camilleri, A. F. (2017). Blockchain in Education. Inamorato dos Santos, A.(ed.) EUR 28778 EN; doi:10.2760/60649 https://www.crue.org/Documentos%20compartidos/Publicaciones/Universitic/Universitic_2014.pdf

Lévy, P. (2018). Cómo utilizo la web social en mis clases de la universidad. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, 57. Consultado el (dd/mm/aaaa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/57/levy_es.pdf  DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/red/57/1

Merrill, M. D. (2002). First principles of instruction. Educational technology research and development, 50(3), 43-59. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02505024 y https://mdavidmerrill.com/Papers/firstprinciplesbymerrill.pdf

Merrill, M. D. (2002). First principles of instruction. Educational technology research and development, 50(3), 43-59. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02505024 y https://mdavidmerrill.com/Papers/firstprinciplesbymerrill.pdf

Merrill, M. D. (2007). First principles of instruction: A synthesis. In R. A. Reiser & J. V. Dempsey (Eds.), Trends and issues in instructional design and technology (2nd ed., pp. 62-71). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice-Hall.

Merrill, M. D. (2009). First principles of instruction. In C. M. Reigeluth & A. A. Carr-Chellman (Eds.), Instructional-design theories and models: Building a common knowledge base (Vol. III, pp. 41-56). New York: Routledge.

Píriz, S. (2015). Vídeo en l seminario de la UIMP SMART UNIVERSITY 4.0: LA REALIDAD CUÁNTICA DE LA UNIVERSIDAD DEL FUTURO. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=Q45pYGkSBPY

Reigeluth, C. M. (1999). What is instructional-design theory and how is it changing. Instructional-design theories and models: A new paradigm of instructional theory2, 5-29.

Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional-design theories and models: A new paradigm of instructional theory (Vol. II, pp. 5-29). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Seaman, J. E., Allen, I. E., & Seaman, J. (2018). Grade Increase: Tracking Distance Education in the United States. Babson Survey Research Group. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED580852.pdf

Shah (December 2016) MOOC Trends in 2016: College Credit, Credentials, and Degrees: https://www.classcentral.com/report/mooc-trends-credit-credentials-degrees/

Suárez Lantarón, B. (2017). El WhatsApp como herramienta de apoyo a la tutoría. REDU. Revista de Docencia Universitaria15(2), 193-210.

Wang, Q., Woo, H. L., Quek, C. L., Yang, Y., & Liu, M. (2012). Using the Facebook group as a learning management system: An exploratory study. British Journal of Educational Technology43(3), 428-438. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2011.01195.x

Zapata-Ros, M. (2013). Enseñanza Universitaria en línea, MOOC y aprendizaje divergente. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/235955610_Ensenanza_Universitaria_en_linea_MOOC_y_aprendizaje_divergente

Zapata-Ros, M. (2013). Los MOOCs, génesis, evolución y alternativa. Génesis (I). La crisis de la universidad como legitimadora social del  . https://red.hypotheses.org/505

Zapata-Ros, M. (Agosto 2013). El diseño instruccional de los MOOCs y el de los nuevos cursos online abiertos personalizados (POOCs). http://eprints.rclis.org/19744/

Zapata-Ros, M. (2013). Enseñanza Universitaria en línea, MOOC y aprendizaje divergente. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/235955610_Ensenanza_Universitaria_en_linea_MOOC_y_aprendizaje_divergente

Zapata-Ros, M. (5 sep. 2014). Los MOOC en la crisis de la Educación Universitaria.: Docencia, diseño y aprendizaje. https://www.amazon.es/Los-MOOC-crisis-Educaci%C3%B3n-Universitaria/dp/1500607932/ref=sr_1_3

Zapata-Ros, M. (Sept 2014). http://scholar.google.es/scholar_url?url=https://revistas.um.es/red/article/download/236611/180881&hl=es&sa=X&scisig=AAGBfm1PZKzQsXmioSmJv7TFDBbnBy7w7g&nossl=1&oi=scholarr

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). El diseño instruccional de los MOOC y el de los nuevos cursos abiertos personalizados. Revista de Educación a Distancia, (45). https://revistas.um.es/red/article/view/238661

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). El diseño instruccional de los MOOC y el de los nuevos cursos abiertos personalizados. Revista de Educación a Distancia, (45). https://revistas.um.es/red/article/view/238661

Zapata-Ros, M. (2017). Latinoamérica y la educación superior en la encrucijada de la Sociedad del Conocimiento. Desafíos y disrupciones. OSF.IO. https://osf.io/preprints/f8e39/  DOI 10.31219/osf.io/f8e39

Zapara-Ros, M. (Enero 2018). Gestión del aprendizaje y web social en la educación superior en línea. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, 57(7). Consultado el (dd/mm/aaaa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/57/zapata.pdf DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/red/57/7

Zapata-Ros, M. (Enero 2018b). La universidad inteligente. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, 57(10). Consultado el (dd/mm/aaaa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/57/zapata2.pdf DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/red/57/10

Zapata-Ros, M. (2018 July 2). Latinoamérica y la educación superior en la encrucijada de la Sociedad del Conocimiento. Desafíos y disrupciones. OSF.IO. https://osf.io/preprints/f8e39/  DOI 10.31219/osf.io/f8e39

Zapata-Ros, M. (Diciembre 2018). Pensamiento computacional en los primeros ciclos educativos, un pensamiento computacional desenchufado (I) https://red.hypotheses.org/1508

 

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159).
Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria.
Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York.
Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

El artículo, su estructura y naturaleza. Formatos.

Raidell Avello Martínez

Universidad de Cienfuegos, Cuba. Coordinador editorial de RED.

Contenido

El artículo, su estructura y naturaleza. Formatos. 1

  1. Introducción. 1

1.2.       ¿Qué es una publicación científica?. 2

  1. Tipos de artículos científicos. 4

2.1         El artículo original de investigación. 4

2.2.       ¿Cuáles son los principales tipos de artículos científicos?. 8

2.3.       Otros tipos de contribuciones. 10

  1. Aspectos formales de la mayoría de los tipos de artículos científicos. 11
  2. Estructura del artículo original de investigación (tipo IMRyD). 14
  3. ¿Qué es un artículo preprint?. 17
  4. Conclusiones. 20
  5. Referencias. 22

 

 

 

1.      Introducción

La investigación científica tiene como objetivo transformar y avanzar el conocimiento en un área determinada. A partir de la aplicación del método científico los investigadores pueden confirmar o rechazar hipótesis que se plantean ante problemáticas que se presentan en su campo de investigación. Como parte final de este proceso, como se muestra en la figura 1, se concibe la publicación de los resultados, incluyendo la metodología (métodos, muestra, características de los participantes, procedimientos, instrumentos) que se siguió para alcanzarlos. Este proceso de publicación contribuye a que se eviten investigaciones redundantes y que se propaguen las mejores prácticas a partir de los resultados que se obtienen.

Figura 1. Fases de la investigación.

 

La elaboración de un artículo científico original (más adelante se explicará qué es un artículo científico) tiene siempre como objetivo mostrar a la comunidad científica los avances en el conocimiento. Esto significa socializar, a través de un escrito, los procesos y hallazgos de la investigación llevada a cabo.

De ahí que cada nueva contribución, además de ofrecer contenidos originales, deba tener en consideración las investigaciones realizadas en el área en cuestión, como antecedentes y contrastación de los resultados. La escritura de un texto académico lleva implícito, por consiguiente, el contacto con otros textos, cuya lectura permite, en primera instancia, conocer el estado del arte[1] de un tema determinado.

Aquí radica la importancia de publicar los resultados de la investigación científica, pues a través de ella se construye el conocimiento. A lo largo de los siglos y con gran esfuerzo se publican sistemáticamente numerosos trabajos que estudian una hipótesis razonada sobre el funcionamiento de la realidad. Su legado es lo que ha conformado con el tiempo la tradición, una cultura que representa ahora nuestro punto de partida.

 

1.2.¿Qué es una publicación científica?

 

Figura 2. Portadas de revistas científicas.

Una publicación, ya sea periódica (que se publican frecuentemente, p.e. revistas, anuarios, boletines) o no (que es una única publicación, p.e. libros), es científica, cuando su contenido incluye resultados de investigación originales e inéditos. En Wikipedia se define (definición: 16/03/2017) como: “Un texto científico, o sea una publicación científica o comunicación científica, es uno de los últimos pasos de cualquier investigación científica, previo al debate externo”.

En el caso de las revistas, en la actualidad, no existe consenso con respecto a la proporción de artículos originales que debe incluir una publicación para ser considerada científica. Sin embargo, al consultar las exigencias de las principales bases de datos científicas como Scopus, WoS, Scielo, Redalyc, etc., la mayoría considera que una publicación para ser científica, los artículos originales deben representar más del 50% de su contenido.

Hay otro elemento fundamental que distingue una publicación científica y es que su contenido debe ser evaluado por algún mecanismo transparente y explicito, como la revisión por pares, en sus diferentes modalidades.

Algunos ejemplos, como los que siguen, ilustran estos planteamientos:

Revista RED: “En todo caso los trabajos deberán ser originales, académicos y dejar en claro cómo van hacer una contribución a los conocimientos y / o a la práctica del campo”. (https://www.um.es/ead/red/normasRED.htm)

Revista Comunicar: “Los trabajos deben ser originales, sin haber sido publicados en ningún medio ni estar en proceso de publicación, siendo responsabilidad de los autores el cumplimiento de esta norma”.  (https://www.revistacomunicar.com/index.php?contenido=normas)

Una revista científica (también conocidas como académicas) es una publicación periódica, que frecuentemente oscilan en períodos desde mensuales, bimensuales, trimestrales, cuatrimestrales, semestrales y anuales. Las revistas científicas se caracterizan por publicar artículos de investigadores de un área del conocimiento en específico, aunque existen revistas multidisciplinares. Además, entre las principales diferencias con una revista general de divulgación es que son editadas, comúnmente, por expertos del área de interés como puede ser psicología, física, química, pedagogía, etc.

Existen cientos de revistas en todas las áreas del conocimiento donde los investigadores comparten sus hallazgos y descubrimientos con sus colegas. Los manuscritos que son enviados a las revistas se evalúan por sus pares, o sea por investigadores de su misma área. Las revistas siguen diferentes esquemas de evaluación, aunque el más común es el “doble ciego”. Esta evaluación por pares debería garantizar la calidad, rigurosidad y cientificidad de la revista (Fonseca, Tur, Gutiérrez, 2014).

Toda revista científica, debe tener al menos un editor y un comité editorial, compuesto por prestigios y conocidos investigadores del área de la revista. Algunas revistas tienen varios equipos editoriales, como consejo de redacción, consejo técnico, etc (como el caso de RED, figura 2, https://www.um.es/ead/red/). Además, debe tener bien identificado y públicar la política editorial, el sistema de evaluación, la licencia bajo la cual se publica el contenido, las directrices para los autores, entre otras informaciones de interés para los autores, lectores y revisores, como se aprecia en el siguiente ejemplo de la revista RED.

Figura 3. Portada de RED.

 

Solamente SCOPUS, una de las principales bases de datos que indexan revistas académicas, creada por la editorial científica multinacional Elsevier, tiene entre sus registros más de 24000 revistas y Web of Science, la más selecta base actualmente administrada por Carivate Analytics (Anteriormente Thomson-Reuter), atesora unas 13000. En estas dos bases se encuentran las revistas donde, comúnmente, se publican los últimos descubrimientos científicos y donde emergen las nuevas problemáticas y áreas de investigación. En ambas bases, la mayoría de sus revistas siguen el sistema de subscripción comercial, o sea, que hay que pagar para acceder al contenido.

Como se ha comentado, las revistas científicas son uno de los principales canales de comunicación y difusión de los resultados de investigación y de institucionalización social de la ciencia en la mayoría de los campos del conocimiento, pero no todas tienen el mismo prestigio y grado de influencia en la comunidad científica. Su reconocimiento depende en gran medida de su calidad y su visibilidad (Miguel, 2011).

Uno de las principales características de las revistas publicadas en estas dos bases mencionadas, es que la mayoría de los artículos, más del 90%, están escritos en inglés, lo cual indudablemente es una barrera para muchos investigadores, por más que se suponga que la lengua franca para el intercambio académico internacional sea ese idioma. Además, el inglés necesario para publicar en una de estas revistas, tiene que ser de un nivel profesional, lo cual es difícil alcanzar por los investigadores, por lo que, frecuentemente, hay que contratar los servicios de traducción que representan un gran desembolso para países en vías de desarrollo y más desfavorecidos.

 

2.      Tipos de artículos científicos

 

2.1  El artículo original de investigación[2]

 

La pregunta: ¿Qué es un artículo original de investigación?, puede parecer muy sencilla, trillada y básica para un profesor/investigador, sin embargo, me la consultan frecuentemente, al igual que a otros colegas, sobre todo editores e investigadores asociados al mundo de la edición de revistas científicas.

Este fenómeno lo he asociado, sobre todo, a la diversidad de variantes de artículos (artículos de investigación, revisiones, recensiones, cartas al director/editor, propuestas, experiencias, buenas prácticas, etc., como se verá más adelante) que publican muchas revistas académicas/científicas. Sin embargo, no hay que perder de vista, que la esencia de una revista “científica” son los artículos originales de investigación, son su origen, las bases fundacionales que le asignaron esta categoría.

Un artículo científico es un trabajo, generalmente breve (entre 6 a 20 cuartillas, o, como es tendencia, 4000-6500 palabras aproximadamente), cuya finalidad suele ser la comunicación de los resultados de la investigación. Los criterios de calidad del mismo los aportan el rigor científico-metodológico con el que se haga la investigación, la originalidad y en cierta medida “el lugar donde se publica”.

Figura 4. Ejemplo de artículo científico, Revista Perfiles Educativos.

 

El artículo científico es un texto escrito que informa por primera vez de los resultados de una investigación y que es redactado y publicado siguiendo normas muy concretas aceptadas por la comunidad científica internacional, cuyo uso asegura la comunicación efectiva de la información en todo el mundo. Según la UNESCO (1983), la finalidad principal de un artículo científico es comunicar los resultados de investigaciones, ideas y debates de una manera clara, concisa y fidedigna.

Un artículo de investigación original es el informe de un proceso de investigación  a partir de la aplicación de experimentos o resultado de la aplicación de métodos científicos (aplicación del método científico, figura 3), este debe reunir las siguientes características: ser consecuencia de una investigación, ser original y aportar algo novedoso al campo científico al que se dedica, presentar una estructura adecuada a esta tipología y ajustarse a las normas de publicación de la revista donde se va a publicar.

Figura 5. Aplicación del método científico.

 

Curiosamente, muchas revistas en sus normas o directrices para autores (indicaciones, etc.) no dejan claro que características debe tener cada uno de los tipos de artículos que admiten, de hecho, algunas solo mencionan “artículos originales”, sin embargo, considero que este es un apartado muy importante para la orientación de los autores y no perder tiempo en los envíos que, sin tener en cuenta estos elementos, serán rechazados solo en una primera revisión del editor.

Por otra parte, encontramos revistas que explican con detalles los tipos de artículos admitidos, y otras que, además, como RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia (http://www.um.es/ead/red/normasRED.htm), brindan detalles específicos con respecto a algunos tipos de artículos, por ejemplo:

“En los casos de artículos que incluyan una o más investigaciones solo se admite el método conocido como self-report study[2] como método auxiliar, en ningún caso para probar la tesis principal del estudio”

De manera más detallada, para un artículo ser considerado “original” y de
“investigación” debe cumplir, al menos, los siguientes requisitos:

  • Debe ser inédito, o sea, no puede haber sido publicado con anterioridad. Es importante señalar que esta restricción está siendo modificada por nuevas tendencias abiertas de la publicación científica, donde se admite que el investigador publique un preprint de su trabajo o, incluso, en entradas (posts) en blogs o sitios académicos.
  • Debe ser resultado de un estudio de investigación científico, o sea con la aplicación de métodos cuantitativos, cualitativos, o siguiendo un enfoque mixto.
  • El trabajo debe responder una hipótesis, idea a defender o pregunta(s) de investigación.
  • Se exponen material y métodos, en mayor detalle posible: descripción de la muestra, participantes, procedimientos de aplicación de los métodos, procedimientos de análisis de los datos obtenidos, etc., de manera que pueda ser replicable la investigación.
  • Se reportan los resultados de manera precisa y evidenciando un manejo adecuado de los datos.
  • Se interpretan los resultados y se discuten posibles implicaciones de los hallazgos con respecto a los antecedentes discutidos y comentados en la introducción o revisión de la literatura.

Inicialmente las publicaciones eran descriptivas, pero a mediados del siglo XIX, gracias a Pasteur y Koch, que confirmaron la teoría microbiológica de las enfermedades, se hizo necesario describir en forma detallada la metodología para acallar a los fanáticos de la generación espontánea y el dogma de la reproducibilidad se hizo central. Esto fue el principio del IMRyD (Villagrán, y Harris, 2009).

Luego vino el desarrollo de la microbiología y otros grandes avances con cuantiosos fondos de apoyo a la investigación que provocó un incremento acelerado de la ciencia y esta a su vez produjo un gran número de artículos, de modo que las revistas debieron exigir cada vez más publicaciones precisas, lo cual fue la génesis del sistema: Introducción, Metodología, Resultados y Discusión (IMRyD). Esta estructura, evidentemente replica e informa la investigación siguiendo sus propios procesos, pero de manera concisa.

Para comprender mejor esta estructura, se puede usar la figura 4, tipo mapa conceptual, que diseñé para un curso sobre publicación científica que, de manera sencilla, explica el proceso y estructura de un artículo de investigación científica, que puede ser de utilidad para este engorroso pero necesario proceso:

 

Figura 6. El artículo científico.

Como se ha podido apreciar en estos comentarios, es importante para un investigador tener claridad y diferenciar, dentro de los tipos de artículo que puede publicar, al artículo de investigación y priorizarlo, ya que encontrará mayores posibilidades de publicación, pues las principales bases de datos (WoS, Scopus, Scielo, etc.) tienen exigencias bien rigurosas con la proporción de estos artículos con respecto a las demás variantes.

El artículo científico se ha adaptado perfectamente (y por ende, las revistas, aunque estas a menor ritmo) a la era de Internet: su brevedad y objetividad, sus metadatos internos y externos (títulos, descriptores, resúmenes, referencias), su estandarización y sobre todo su capacidad de navegar por la red de forma flexible y universal lo han consagrado como canal privilegiado (Comunicar, 2018, https://www.revistacomunicar.com/).

 

2.2.¿Cuáles son los principales tipos de artículos científicos?

 

El campo de investigación requiere persistencia y la mayoría de los investigadores dedican muchas noches de insomnio a realizar investigaciones y documentar resultados. En el mundo competitivo de la academia, se espera que comiences a publicar al principio de tu carrera, y muchos investigadores de carrera temprana se enfrentan a la inminente preocupación de cómo publicar un artículo de una revista. Aunque la investigación original a veces toma años en completarse, no significa que no pueda tener ninguna publicación acreditada hasta el momento en que complete su investigación.

Existen diferentes tipos de literatura académica, algunas de las cuales requieren investigación original (categorizada como literatura primaria) y otras basadas en otros trabajos publicados (literatura secundaria). Por tanto, es importante tener una idea clara sobre los diferentes tipos de artículos que puede publicar en revistas. Esto le ayudará a comprender las formas en que puede difundir su trabajo e identificar qué tipo de artículo sería adecuado para su estudio.

Los tipos de publicaciones son diferentes, e incluso varía entre los disímiles campos del saber. Por ejemplo, un ensayo clínico es posible solo en el campo de la medicina, mientras que un estudio empírico es más común en el campo de las ciencias sociales. Es importante recordar que no todas las revistas publican todo tipo de artículos. Por lo tanto, la mayoría de los editores de revistas proporcionan a los posibles autores directrices precisas y específicas para los diferentes artículos que publican. Las especificaciones sobre los tipos de artículos publicados se pueden encontrar en la sección de pautas para autores en el sitio web de una revista.

A continuación, se exponen los tipos fundamentales (más publicados en revistas científicas), y su promedio en longitud. Evidentemente, como es un promedio, esto puede variar y se pueden encontrar revistas muy alejadas de estas cifras, pero en este caso nos referimos a la regularidad:

  • Investigaciones (Artículos originales): (5.000/6.000 palabras de texto, incluidas referencias).
  • Revisiones: (6.000/7.000 palabras de texto, incluidas referencias). Revisión exhaustiva del estado-de-la-cuestión de un tema de investigación reciente y actual. Se valorará la bibliografía selectiva de alrededor de unas 100 obras.
  • Reseñas de libros: (600/2000 palabras de texto). Textos descriptivos y críticos sobre publicaciones recientes.

 

No comentaré las características de los artículos originales porque ya fue abordado en el apartado anterior. Pero, a continuación aparecen algunas características generales de los demás tipos más frecuentes de artículos científicos.

 

Principales características del artículo de revisión:

 

Los artículos de revisión proporcionan un análisis crítico y constructivo de la literatura publicada existente en un campo, a través de un resumen, análisis y comparación, a menudo identificando brechas o problemas específicos y brindando recomendaciones para futuras investigaciones. Se consideran literatura secundaria. No se presentan nuevos datos del trabajo experimental del autor. Los artículos de revisión pueden ser de tres tipos, en términos generales: revisiones de literatura, revisiones sistemáticas y metanálisis. Los artículos de revisión pueden tener diferentes longitudes según la revista y el área temática.

 

En resumen, el artículo de revisión:

  • No es una publicación original.
  • Examina la bibliografía de un área disciplinar de manera exhaustiva y rigurosa.
  • Sintetiza los resultados y conclusiones de varias investigaciones en un tópico que se encuentran fragmentadas.
  • Puede reflejar el desempeño histórico de un área disciplinar.
  • Analiza y discute sobre aspectos que no han sido tratados y que tienen relevancia para el desarrollo del campo de investigación.
  • Compara la información de diferentes fuentes.
  • Sugiere ideas para trabajos futuros a partir del análisis de los resultados incluidos en los trabajos referenciados.
  • Son dentro de los artículos científicos los más citados y de mayor extensión.

 

Figura 7. Ejemplo de artículo de revisión. Revista Magis.

 

Principales características de la Reseña de libro:

 

Las reseñas de libros se publican en la mayoría de las revistas académicas. El objetivo de una reseña de libro es proporcionar una perspectiva y opinión sobre los libros académicos recientemente publicados. Son artículos relativamente cortos y requieren menos tiempo. Las reseñas de libros son una buena opción de publicación para los investigadores de carrera temprana, ya que le permite mantenerse al tanto de la literatura en este campo, al mismo tiempo que se agrega a su lista de publicaciones.

 

2.3. Otros tipos de contribuciones

 

  • Editorial. Artículos cortos de presentación de un número, que frecuentemente incluye un resumen de los artículos que conforman el número.
  • Reportes técnicos. Se refieren a informes o reportes de funcionamiento o descripción de alguna tecnología.
  • Cartas al director/editor. Cartas de investigadores a los directores o editores de revistas sobre algún tema de actualidad en específico o refiriéndose a algún trabajo publicado con anterioridad en la propia revista.
  • Resúmenes de tesis de doctorado: Resúmenes de entre 10 y 20 cuartillas de los principales resultados de tesis de doctorado.
  • Comunicaciones cortas. Artículos de investigaciones de unas 4 cuartillas con resultados preliminares, trabajo de campo o exposición de temas emergentes.
  • Entrevistas: Entrevistas a investigadores del área de la revista sobre temas de actualidad e interés a la comunidad científica.
  • Informes, Estudios y Propuestas: Son estudios iniciales de futuras investigaciones científicas rigurosas. Exploraciones en campos emergentes. Pueden ser trabajos en desarrollo. Frecuentemente no hay aplicación rigurosa del método científico. Son narraciones de experiencias o propuestas implementadas (o sin implementar) pero sin una planificación metodológica y científica.
  • Perspectiva: son revisiones académicas de conceptos fundamentales o ideas prevalecientes en un campo. Estos son generalmente ensayos que presentan un punto de vista personal que critica las nociones generalizadas relacionadas con un campo. Una pieza de perspectiva puede ser una revisión de un solo concepto o algunos conceptos relacionados.
  • Opinión: presentan el punto de vista del autor sobre la interpretación, el análisis o los métodos utilizados en un estudio en particular. Permite al autor comentar sobre la fuerza y ​​la debilidad de una teoría o hipótesis. Los artículos de opinión generalmente se basan en críticas constructivas y deben estar respaldados por evidencia. Dichos artículos promueven la discusión sobre temas actuales relacionados con la ciencia. Estos también son artículos relativamente cortos.
  • Comentarios: son artículos cortos que suelen tener entre 1000 y 1500 palabras y que llaman la atención sobre un artículo, libro o informe publicado anteriormente, y explican por qué les interesó y cómo podría ser esclarecedor para los lectores.

 

3.      Aspectos formales de la mayoría de los tipos de artículos científicos

 

Título

  • Su extensión depende de la política de la revista, aunque en promedio es de 10 a 15 palabras.
  • Expresa en síntesis el contenido del artículo (debido a lo cual se recomienda escribir al concluir este)
  • Debe ser atractivo, breve y conciso.
  • Identifica el tema con facilidad.
  • Debe ser preciso, evitar parábolas, metáforas o expresiones como: Contribución, estudio.

 

Autoría

  • Utilice y provea su identificador ORCID (http://www.orcid.org), para un mejor reconocimiento de su autoría. Las bases de datos de científicos como ORCID, consisten en servicios donde un investigador aporta sus datos de filiación institucional, su trayectoria académica y su producción científica, que sitúa en una rama del saber concreta, seleccionada por el interesado, de la cual los servicios editoriales e indexadores pueden obtener los datos de una fuente única y evitar errores.
  • Escriba siempre su nombre de la misma manera.
  • Escribir los nombres y apellidos de todos los autores, así como: filiación, correo electrónico, ciudad y país donde se encuentra su filiación institucional.
  • En el caso de autores iberoamericanos se sugiere separar por guion los apellidos.
  • El nombre de la institución se escribirá según idioma de origen.
  • Se debe escribir la dirección postal en caso que sea necesario, según la revista a la que se postule el manuscrito lo exija, especialmente el autor para correspondencia.

 

Resumen

  • El resumen es la parte del artículo científico que sintetiza todo el trabajo realizado por el investigador.
  • Informa al lector si es conveniente y necesario leer el trabajo completo.
  • Constituye la antesala para que la investigación genere una influencia en el campo disciplinar al que se pretende contribuir.
  • A modo general es la parte del artículo que se procesa en todas las bases de datos bibliográficas, lo más visible y consultado.
  • Representa un esquema lógico conductor de la investigación realizada, por lo cual debe su redacción representar cada parte de la estructura de un artículo científico.

 

La siguiente gráfica ayuda a la elaboración y comprensión de los diferentes tipos de resúmenes: Comprensivo (Estructurado y no estructurado y Descriptivo.

Figura 8. Tipos de resúmenes.

 

Palabras clave

  • En promedio se escriben de tres a cinco palabras, aunque es importante revisar las particularidades de cada revista.
  • Apegarse a los tesauros de ERIC o UNESCO u otras variantes asumidas por las revistas.
  • Incluir la traducción al inglés (keywords).

 

Tablas

Las tablas concentran la información con brevedad y la muestran de manera eficien­te. También proporcionan la información en cualquier nivel de detalle y precisión deseado. La inclusión de tablas para mostrar los resultados, en lugar de texto, permite reducir la extensión del trabajo y ganar en objetividad.

 

Ilustraciones (figuras)

Las ilustraciones son muy útiles y vistosas para mostrar resultados o contenidos, pero deben ser presentadas en un formato adecua­do para su publicación impresa. La mayoría de los sistemas de edición dan instrucciones detalladas sobre la calidad de imágenes y las comprueban después de car­garla en la plataforma. Para remitir imágenes impresas deben estar dibujadas y fotografiadas profesional­mente o pueden ser presentadas en formato digital.

 

Unidades de medida

Las medidas de longitud, altura, peso y volumen deben ser expresadas en unidades métricas (metro, kilogramo, o litro) o sus múltiplos y decimales. La temperatura debe estar en grados Celsius. Las cifras de presión arterial deben estar en milímetros de mercu­rio, a menos que la revista especifique que se requieren otras unidades.

 

Agradecimientos

  • Este apartado es optativo.
  • Suele situarse al final del cuerpo del artículo (tras los resultados y discusión) y precediendo a la bibliografía.
  • En él se incluyen todas las aportaciones de aquellas personas que no han firmado el artículo y que han colaborado de alguna manera con él: ayuda técnica, revisiones y sugerencias, apoyo en muestreos o experimentos y facilidad de acceso a colecciones y bibliotecas.
  • También se incluyen los agradecimientos por las ayudas financieras (proyectos, subvenciones, becas) que han sido concedidas para la realización del trabajo. Aunque es común encontrar este apartado separado, como es el caso de RED (http://www.um.es/ead/red/normasRED.htm)
  • Es importante señalar la diferencia entre un apartado de agradecimientos y la dedicatoria de un libro. No es necesario halagar exageradamente a un colega o maestro para mostrarle nuestro agradecimiento.
  • No obstante, este es un aspecto variable según los autores, ya que muchos consideran este apartado como algo más personal, donde pueden soslayarse algunas de estas recomendaciones.

 

Referencias

 

El listado de referencias consultadas y citadas en un texto científico es como los ingredientes de una receta de cocina, mientras mejor calidad tenga y sean los justos y necesarios, es mucho más fácil alcanzar el resultado esperado. Claro, como también ocurre en la literatura científica, no siempre tenemos, por problemas económicos, el acceso a ellos. Pero casi siempre hay alguna alternativa para paliar esta situación.

Lo primero es hacer una búsqueda exhaustiva en las principales bases de datos científicas, como Scopus y Web of Science, a las cuáles tenemos acceso. Además, utilizar una eficiente estrategia de búsqueda, de lo más específico del asunto que estamos buscando a lo más general, en dependencia del volumen y pertinencia de las referencias recuperadas. En caso de no tener acceso, siempre está la opción de buscar en Google Académico y luego, los artículos encontrados a los cuales no tengamos acceso, los podemos buscar en redes académicas como Researchgate, en las cuales muchos investigadores publican preprints (https://www.researchgate.net/), o incluso los artículos en postprint. Otra opción, muy eficiente en mi caso, es pedir el artículo a los autores, casi siempre con muy buenas opciones de respuesta, incluso muchas veces terminas con más de un artículo de ese investigador.

En todo caso, es muy importante complementar la búsqueda en bases de datos complementarias, internacionales o regionales, sobre todo de acceso abierto y de gran calidad como, Scielo (https://www.scielo.org/), Redalyc (https://www.redalyc.org), DOAJ (https://www.doaj.org/), entre otras. Aunque algunos investigadores puedan no estar de acuerdo, en revistas indexadas en estas bases, se encuentran mucha literatura de gran calidad científica, y que, por causas económicas, de idioma, de gestión, voluntariedad de sus miembros, tiempo, etc., no han logrado incluirse en las bases de primera línea.

4.      Estructura del artículo original de investigación (tipo IMRyD)

 

El orden particular de las publicaciones científicas responde a una descripción explícita del proceso de investigación en cuanto a sus métodos y materiales utilizados, los resultados obtenidos, las conclusiones del estudio presentadas en forma de discusiones y las referencias bibliográficas consultadas.

Este modelo incluye el método conocido como IMRyD, por las iniciales de las partes centrales del documento científico (Introducción, Método, Resultados y Discusión), y se considera actualmente el sistema más adecuado para presentar información científica sin distinción de las áreas disciplinares; esto es así por la estructuración lógica de los datos que tiene correspondencia con el proceso mismo de la investigación (Cisneros y Olave, 2012).

Figura 9. Fases del proceso de investigación en relación con la tipología IMRyD.

Si bien se trata de una estructura que, por estandarizada, genera restricciones en cuanto a la libertad de redacción, resulta bastante útil a la hora de elaborar informes, porque este tipo de textos están más centrados en la descripción y divulgación de las experiencias científicas que en la búsqueda de innovación en cuanto a la estructuración de las ideas: prima aquí un criterio más práctico que estético en la redacción. A continuación, se describen las principales características de cada una de sus partes:

 

Introducción

La introducción explica por qué esta investigación es importante y necesaria. Comience describiendo el problema o la situación que motiva la investigación. Pase a discutir el estado actual de la investigación en el campo; luego revela una «brecha» o problema en el campo. Finalmente, explique cómo la presente investigación es una solución a ese problema o brecha. Si el estudio tiene hipótesis o preguntas de investigación, se presentan al final de la introducción.

En resumen,

  • Se presenta el tema de la investigación.
  • Se debe exponer claramente el problema de investigación
  • La justificación (¿Por qué se realizó? ¿Cuál es su relevancia?)
  • Este apartado finaliza con la hipótesis, la pregunta de investigación y/o los objetivos.
  • Una breve reseña sobre los trabajos previos existentes acerca del tema (antecedentes).
  • El marco teórico expuesto de forma sucinta (conceptos, definiciones…)

 

Metodología

La sección de métodos describe a los lectores cómo condujo su estudio. Incluye información sobre su población, muestra, métodos y equipo. El «estándar de oro» de la sección de métodos es que debería permitir a los lectores duplicar su estudio. Las secciones de los métodos suelen utilizar subtítulos; están escritas en tiempo pasado, y usan mucha voz pasiva. Esta es típicamente la sección menos leída de un informe IMRyD.

En resumen, se plantea:

  • El enfoque de la investigación (Cualitativo, cuantitativo o mixto).
  • El alcance de la investigación (Exploratorio, descriptivo, correlacional o explicativo).
  • El diseño de la investigación (Experimental, no experimental).
  • Los participantes o sujetos.
  • Las herramientas o instrumentos empleados.
  • El procedimiento.
  • La recolección de los datos.
  • Debe escribirse en pasado.
  • Técnicas de validación.

 

Resultados

En esta sección, usted presenta sus resultados. Normalmente, la sección de Resultados contiene solo los hallazgos, no una explicación o comentario sobre los hallazgos (ver más abajo). Las secciones de resultados usualmente se escriben en tiempo pasado. Asegúrese de que todas las tablas y figuras estén etiquetadas y numeradas por separado. Los subtítulos van por encima de las tablas y debajo de las figuras.

En resumen,

  • Presenta los nuevos conocimientos que arrojó el proceso investigativo.
  • Debe responder directamente a la sección de Metodología sin repetir la información de esta sección.
  • Se incluyen aquí las tablas y figuras, que expresan los detalles de los resultados.
  • El texto expone las generalidades.
  • Se debe evitar la información no necesaria y redundante.
  • La información presentada debe ser comprendida de manera rápida y clara por parte del lector.

Figura 10. Tipo de contenido y su relación con el impacto en el lector (Torres-Salinas, y Cabezas-Clavijo, 2013).

 

Discusión

En esta sección, usted resume sus principales hallazgos, comenta esos hallazgos y los conecta con otras investigaciones. También discute las limitaciones de su estudio (Avello et al, 2019) y utiliza estas limitaciones como razones para sugerir investigaciones futuras adicionales.

En resumen,

  • Constituye la parte más difícil de redactar y componer del artículo científico, se trata de contextualizar nuestros resultados en el área disciplinaria.
  • Después del resumen es la parte del artículo científico que más se lee.
  • Se debe interpretar con total riqueza y argumento científico los resultados y comparar con investigaciones similares, resaltando el aporte de nuestro hallazgo.
  • No repetir los resultados.
  • Explicar el significado de los resultados.
  • Escribir esta sección en presente.
  • Teorizar sobre los datos obtenidos y consideraciones para futuras investigaciones.
  • Mencionar las limitaciones y no esconder datos anómalos tratando de darles una explicación lógica.

4.      ¿Qué es un artículo preprint?[3]

 

Un preprint es un manuscrito, comúnmente electrónico, que un autor publica antes, o incluso después, de haber sido revisado por pares (o por cualquier otro sistema de evaluación), editado o maquetado para la publicación por la editorial de una revista académica. En otras palabras, un preprint es un documento enviado a una revista académica, pero que todavía no ha alcanzado la decisión de ser publicado, aunque también puede ser un documento no enviado a ninguna revista, publicado en un servidor de auto-archivo. Es importante también comentar, que los preprints ya existían desde hace mucho tiempo. incluso antes de la aparición de Internet, desde finales de los años 50, estos eran impresos y enviados por correo a los investigadores y bibliotecas, mucho antes que fueran revisados por pares y publicados en una revista.

En la variante de auto-archivo, cada vez más popular, el preprint es depositado por el autor en un servidor de preprints, habitualmente temático, siguiendo procedimientos públicos. La versión preprint puede ser incluso un avance o una versión incompleta del manuscrito (aunque lo más común es una versión final). Utilizando este servicio los autores pueden solicitar comentarios y agregar las sugerencias al manuscrito que puede ser enviado posteriormente al proceso editorial formal de una revista.

Algunos ejemplos de los servidores más reconocidos son: arXiv.org – http://arxiv.org/, ASAPbio – http://asapbio.org/, bioRxiv.org – http://biorxiv.org/,  ChemRxiv – http://pubs.acs.org/meetingpreprints, y F1000Research – https://f1000research.com. Algunos de estos servidores, llamados también repositorios, empiezan ya a ofrecer la posibilidad de realizar depósitos de los preprint al mismo tiempo que se permite la opción de enviar el trabajo directamente a una revista para su revisión por pares (como bioRxiv). Claro, siempre y cuando la revista lo permita. 

Muchas revistas, como Comunicar, han comprendido las posibilidades e importancia de estas prácticas y publican, unos meses antes, los artículos en preprint que serán publicados el próximo número. La revista Comunicar, publica en sus llamados a artículos cuando estarán disponibles los preprints (ver siguiente figura). Otras revistas como “RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia” y “Educational Tecnology & Sociaty”, van publicando los artículos, incluso sin formatear, conforme son aceptados por los revisores antes de la fecha oficial del número. Estas prácticas están respaldadas en estudios que demuestran que la publicación anticipada de los manuscritos aceptados contribuye a crear una ciencia más transparente, rápida, visible y ofrece posibilidades de recibir citas y feedback de la comunidad científica de forma anticipada antes de la publicación definitiva del trabajo.

Figura 11. Anuncio de versión preprint de los artículos de la Revista Comunicar.

 

Para ilustrar los beneficios comentados sobre los preprints, se puede apreciar en la siguiente figura como la revista “Physical Review” obtiene un mayor número de citas los meses antes de ser publicado un artículo:

 

Figura 12. Relación entre cantidad de artículos en preprint y las citas recibidas antes y después de su publicación oficial.

 

En resumen, los beneficios principales de usar preprints son:

  • Acceso abierto en forma inmediata al artículo.
  • Obtener más comentarios sobre su trabajo por parte de colegas antes de ser publicado el manuscrito.
  • Los preprints aumentan la cantidad de downloads y en consecuencia la visibilidad de los autores, sus trabajos y, posiblemente, las citaciones.
  • Disminuye en forma importante el retraso en la publicación de los artículos, que causa grandes frustraciones y reclamaciones en prioridad.

Por otra parte, algunos investigadores consideran un postprint a la versión final del manuscrito aceptada por el editor, una vez finalizado el proceso de revisión por pares, en la cual el autor ha incorporado los cambios o correcciones resultados de dicha revisión. Sin embargo, muchos investigadores coinciden en que un postprint es la publicación de un artículo que ya ha sido publicado por una revista incluyendo toda la identificación de esta. Esta práctica no siempre es aceptada por las editoriales por lo cual hay que tenerlo en cuenta antes de publicarlo.

Igualmente, hay revistas como Comunicar, Profesorado y RED, que incentivan a los autores a que archiven sus artículos una vez publicados en redes sociales académicas como ResearchGate y Academia.edu, donde ya se pueden encontrar millones de documentos, tanto preprints como postprints, a disposición de los investigadores.

Finalmente, la adopción generalizada de los preprints, e incluso los postprints, tienen consecuencias en la función de la evaluación por pares (sea ciego o abierto) convirtiéndolo en un proceso más transparente y dinámico. Además, los preprints pueden llegar a ser una solución para el hecho de que mucha de la literatura científica no sea accesible abierta, amplia y rápidamente como sea posible. Además, el rol de las revistas académicas podría cambiar en el proceso de la comunicación científica y convertirse en sellos de reconocimiento o calidad confiable dentro del área de investigación.

El 19 de enero de 2017 se publicó un preprint en bioRxiv, el servidor de preprints de Cold Spring Harbor, lo cual ocurre todo el tiempo, pero lo interesante es el hecho de que el autor principal está afiliado a “Elsevier”, lo cual es esperanzador, ya que Elsevier es una de las editoriales más restrictivas con respecto a la publicación de preprints/postprints.

Por último, la iniciativa regional SciELO, pionero de la publicación en acceso abierto en América Latina desde 1997, también está en el proceso de establecer un servidor de preprints, su objetivo es acelerar el proceso de publicación y aumentar su transparencia, algo que indudablemente será de gran utilidad y una oportunidad para las revistas iberoamericanas.

 

5.      Conclusiones

 

A manera de conclusiones, comparto 10 reglas o consejos para escribir y estructurar un artículo científico, publicadas por Mensh y Kording (2017), donde sintetizan la esencia de los principales elementos del artículo científico:

Regla 1: enfoca tu trabajo en la contribución central que has comunicado en el título.

Regla 2: escribe para seres humanos de carne y hueso que no conocen tu trabajo.

Regla 3: adhiérete al esquema de contenido-conclusión-contexto (C-C-C).

Regla 4: optimice su flujo lógico evitando el zig-zag y utilizando el paralelismo.

Regla 5: cuente la historia completa en el resumen.

Regla 6: comunique por qué el trabajo es importante en la introducción.

Regla 7: escriba los resultados como una secuencia de declaraciones, respaldadas por figuras, que se conectan lógicamente para soportar la contribución central.

Regla 8: discuta cómo se saldó la brecha de conocimiento planteada en la introducción, las limitaciones de la interpretación de los resultados y la relevancia para el campo.

Regla 9: establezca fechas donde sea importante: título, resumen, figuras y esquema.

Regla 10: obtenga comentarios de retroalimentación para reducir, reutilizar y reciclar la historia

Además, estos propios autores diseñaron una valiosa ilustración donde sintetizan estas reglas de manera lógica y didáctica:

 

Figura 13. Resumen de los elementos estructurales del artículo científico

. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005619.g001

 

6.      Referencias

 

Avello, R. (Abr 5, 2017). El escabroso tema de las autocitas. Blog: Escuela de Autores de la Revista Comunicar. https://comunicarautores.wordpress.com/2017/05/29/el-escabroso-tema-de-las-autocitas/

Avello, R. (Jul 10, 2017). Preprint/Postprint. Blog: Escuela de Autores de la Revista Comunicar. https://comunicarautores.com/2017/07/10/preprint-postprint/

Avello, R. (Oct 16, 2017). ¿Qué es un artículo original de investigación? Blog de RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia.

Avello, R., Rodríguez, M.A., Rodríguez, P., Sosa, D., Companioni, B., y Rodríguez, R. (2019) ¿Por qué enunciar las limitaciones del estudio? Medisur, 17(1). Recuperado de: http://www.medisur.sld.cu/index.php/medisur/article/view/4126

Cisneros, M., y Olave, G. (2012). Redacción y publicación de artículos científicos: enfoque discursivo. Bogotá: Ecoe Ediciones.

Comité Internacional de Editores de Revistas Médicas. (2004). Requisitos de uniformidad para los manuscritos enviados a revistas biomédicas: escritura y proceso editorial para la publicación de trabajos biomédicos. Revista Española de Cardiología, 57(6), 538-556.

Fonseca-Mora, M.C.; Tur-Viñes, V.; Gutiérrez-San Miguel, B. (2014). Ética y revistas científicas españolas de Comunicación, Educación y Psicología: la percepción editora. Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 37(4), 187-199. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3989/redc.2014.4.1151

Mensh, B,, Kording, K. (2017). Ten simple rules for structuring papers. PLoS Comput Biol, 13(9). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005619

Miguel, S. (2011). Revistas y producción científica de América Latina y el Caribe: su visibilidad en SciELO, RedALyC y SCOPUS. Revista Interamericana de Bibliotecología, 34(2),187-199.

Nature Publications. Author Resources. Recuperado de: http://www.nature.com/authors/author_resources/article_types.html

Sage Publications.  Manuscript Submission Guidelines. Recuperado de: http://www.uk.sagepub.com/msg/hsr.htm#ARTICLETYPES

Torres-Salinas, D., y Cabezas-Clavijo, Á. (2013). Cómo publicar en revistas científicas de impacto: consejos y reglas sobre publicación científica. EC3 Working Papers, N 31.

UNESCO (1983). Guía para la redacción de artículos científicos destinados a la publicación. Recuperado de: http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0005/000557/055778SB.pdf

Villagrán, A., y Harris, P. R. (2009). Algunas claves para escribir correctamente un artículo científico. Revista chilena de pediatría, 80(1), 70-78. https://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0370-41062009000100010

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). La investigación y la edición científica en la web social: La ciencia compartida. Revista de Educación a Distancia, (3DU). Recuperado de: https://revistas.um.es/red/article/view/244381

[1] Traducción de la frase en inglés: state of the art. Trambién traducida como estado de la cuestión.

[2] Adaptado de: Avello Martínez, R. (Oct 16, 2017). ¿Qué es un artículo original de investigación? Blog de RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia.

[3] Adaptado de: Avello Martínez, R. (Jul 10, 2017). Preprint/Postprint. Blog: Escuela de Autores de la Revista Comunicar. https://comunicarautores.com/2017/07/10/preprint-postprint/

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159). Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria. Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York. Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

Formación de investigadores en competencias digitales para la investigación y para la difusión de la ciencia

Propuesta de acción formativa para el desarrollo de investigadores en edición científica digital, recursos, métodos y tendencias.

ISSN 2386-8562

Propuesta bajo una licencia de Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0

Miguel Zapata Ros

Índice

Módulo I.-

Presentación.-

Competencias clásicas.

Competencias de la Sociedad del Conocimiento, para investigadores como autores y editores: I Competencias clásicas en los nuevos entornos.

Competencias nuevas y nucleares de la edición en entornos digitales.

Conclusión.

1.     La edición y la publicación: Procesos y actores en presencia.

Presentación.- La comunicación científica , indicadores de impacto y calidad.

1.a  El artículo, su estructura y naturaleza. Formatos.

1.b.  Estándares, calidad en la edición, agencias, sellos y listas.

1. c.     Visibilidad de la ciencia y posicionamiento de universidades e investigadores. Repositorios. Acceso abierto y datos abiertos.

1.d.    Proceso de revisión. Editores, revisores, autores.

1.e.     Revistas: Idoneidad, posición y visibilidad. Criterios para que la publicación se publique en la revista adecuada. DOIs,  URLs y Rank page.

2.     La edición en la sociedad del conocimiento.

Presentación.

2.a E-ciencia.

2.b. El ecosistema de autor.

2.c. Literatura gris.

Módulo II

2.c. Autoarchivo. La web 2.0 científica. Acceso abierto y datos abiertos.

3.     Gestión del artículo tras la publicación.

3.a.     La web social científica: Redes, foros y sessions.

3.b.    Cálculos y estrategias: Publish or perish.

3.c.     Elegir los metadatos adecuados y hacer el trabajo fácil a los “harvester”.

3.d.  El inglés en la literatura científica y en los metadatos. Corpus lingüísticos y metadatos.

Módulo III

A1 Generación de DOIs para favorecer su gestión por los harversters.  Edición ¿sin mediación o con mediación tecnológica?.

A2 Datos abiertos.

Referencias.-

Módulo I.- 

Presentación.-

La edición científica constituye un imperativo de la actividad investigadora y también de la innovación docente. Así se pone de manifiesto en todos los procesos de promoción profesional de los universitarios, en su función docente, investigadora o de gestión de la educación universitaria.

El proceso de la edición, de su difusión y de su impacto, visibilidad y citación tiene unas características propias y diferenciadas tanto en la fase de publicación como en la fase gris de la edición en la web social, que la constituyen en una actividad distinta de la publicación científica tradicional que exige una competencia compleja, o una serie de competencias, que la universidad hasta ahora no ha abordado como apoyo a sus profesores, investigadores y gestores.

En la que se denomina “decisión que cambia la vida” los ministros de Economia, Comercio, Industria, Educación y Ciencia han suscrito una resolución para que antes del 2020 toda la ciencia en la EU sea de libre acceso. Esta resolución así como las disposiciones operantes tanto en la EU como en Reino Unido, EE UU o Canadá, y las aplicaciones de la declaración de Budapest sobre Open Access [cita], hacen que la forma estándar de difundir la ciencia sean las de acceso abierto. Por tanto es un imperativo dotar a los investigadores de herramientas conceptuales y procedimentales para la edición en Open Access. Pero esto como veremos ya no es suficiente. Hace falta que se lleven a cabo práctica y políticas, los preprints, el autoarchivo por autores y revistas, y la creación de repositorios por las instituciones , para que la edición es un proceso en progreso desde el mismo momento en que se produce la investigación, en que esta esté viva. Son las opciones oro, y sobre todo verde de edición científica.

Las universidades y los centros de investigación cuentan en la actualidad con una tradición y una presencia notable en el área de edición en Open Access en distintas áreas, pero sobre todo  en Ciencias Sociales y Humanas, como se manifiesta en los indicadores de Webometría, y en general como corresponde por su misión a estas instituciones sea cual sea su área disciplinar.

Corresponde pues a los centros y órganos de decisión hacerse eco y tomar la iniciativa de poner en marcha la formación en este tipo de competencias para los profesores, investigadores y gestores de las universidades.

En cualquier caso, en la sociedad red se han puesto en marcha affordances[1]y procedimientos tecnológicos que cambian desde la raíz las pautas, procedimientos y actores de la edición, sea cual fuere el área donde se produce y con métodos comunes para todos ellos.

Hace falta pues una formación trasversal e interdisciplinar para los investigadores que desarrolle en ellos las habilidades y las  competencias investigadoras y de difusión de la ciencia en la Sociedad del Conocimiento. Esta formación ha de cumplir una serie de requisitos:

  • Ha de hacerse teniendo en cuenta la  condición de los investigadores como autores, pero también como potenciales editores, y como revisores, estos son cada día más necesarios, y la competencia científica no solo se produce en la faceta de autor sino en la vertiente crítica de analizar y conocer lo que otros producen sus puntos fuertes, sus déficits y sus eventuales falacias y falencias.  curadores,…
  • Esa formación tiene que ser común para todos, independientemente de SU ÁMBITO DISCIPLINAR. Tiene elementos y forma en habilidades que son igualmente útiles en los distintos ámbitos y áreas disciplinares.
  • Las universidades, su organización y sus objetivos han de recoger esta necesidad común, más allá de centros y departamentos, como un imperativo estratégico.
  • También se ha de crear una cultura en los profesores e investigadores basada en valores de eficiencia científica y de realización profesional.

El proceso de edición se enmarca en un contexto de herramientas y de entornos que integran las posibilidades de la web social y también las metodologías  de investigación basadas en el diseño, en particular las de la investigación formativa[2], como se pone de relieve en el gráfico siguiente (figura 1) que es el que utilizaremos de forma recurrente en esta documentación

Fig. 1

De forma que paralelamente al transcurrir de la investigación, sobre un diseño de análisis empírico en la mayoría de los casos, transcurre una línea de progreso compartiendo los avances, a través de los recursos que la web social ofrece. Ésta es la que arroja por un lado elementos de análisis para la investigación formativa, permite los aportes de colegas investigadores y equipos de investigación que trabajen en el mismo problema o en otros colaterales o convergentes, y facilita resultados antes de concluir la investigación qu epuedn ser igualmente útiles a otros.

En la figura señalamos varias fases u oleadas de trabajo, desde un primer enunciado del problema en las redes sociales y redes científicas como ResearchGate, Mendeley, etc. la difusión de resultados parciales y provisionales en blosgs y preprint, hasta llegar a la fase de autoarchivo verde (publicación del borrador definitivo o de la galerada del artículo) , para continuar después con la fase clásica de edición, o para volver en un ciclo de feedback sobre alguna fase anterior con una discusión de por medio.

De esta forma la línea de progreso en el trabajo es la que se señala en la figura 2:

Fig. 2

En el marco de las competencias que deben tener los investigadores como autores y editores vamos a distinguir entre  las competencias clásicas, las que ya eran necesarias antes, y las nuevas competencias de la Sociedad del Conocimiento para estos mismos actores y sus funciones, y de entre éstas vamos a distinguir   a) por un lado competencias clásicas,  en los nuevos entornos y b) las competencias nuevas, singulares y nucleares de la edición en entornos digitales.

Competencias clásicas

Así pues hay unas competencias clásicas que desde antes era imprescindible dominar, y que sin constituir un apartado específico en la formación de los investigadores, en la generalidad de los casos, era un saber que se adquiría con la práctica y con la ayuda y la maestría de los investigadores veteranos a través de las direcciones de tesis de doctorado, coaturía de artículos, o simplemente por el estudio y la observación que los investigadores noveles hacían de sus maestro. Entre ellas nos encontramos:

  • Las habilidades propias de la disciplina. Que son diferentes por lo general en cada caso y que constituyen ese saber que se genera en el seno de los equipos de investigación y son dirigidas por catedráticos, investigadores principales, etc.-De esta forma constituyen esas habilidades investigadoras que llamamos propias
    • El diseño de experimentos o el diseño de análisis empíricos en las disciplinas que lo necesitan, la investigación de campo, etc.
    • El análisis de proceso y de resultados, organizando ambos en documentos de difusión con la organización específica y con un estilo y una forma de redacción propia.
    • La gestión singular de datos o de fuentes (con el carácter restricto que se determine o sea necesario por la propia naturaleza de la investigación).
    • La capacidad y el conocimiento y uso de técnicas y la práctica de Interacciones con otros investigadores y otros equipos, parcial y mediante métodos clásicos: Correo, intercambio de ficheros, pruebas, borradores,..
    • Otras habilidades específicas de la investigación en la disciplina
  • El dominio de la práctica de, y para, la publicación, como conjunmto de habilidades previas a la edición y para hacerlo de la forma más eficiente.- Esto supone
    • Dominio de técnica para elaborar un artículo, paper, presentación a un congreso, libro o capítulo de libro,… que supone
      • Conocer los tipos de artículos, y de otras elaboraciones que hay. Así como las claves comunicativas específicas de los distintos tipos de artículo (Análisis empírico, estado del arte, estudios longitudinales…).
      • Conocer la estructura propia de todos ellos
      • Los estilos estándares, tanto de los formatos y de las plantillas como los estilos y las normas de citación y de referencia  (APA, Vancouver, etc)
    • Otra habilidad imprescindible es la de seleccionar la publicación, revista, etc. donde nos interesa publicar. Y saber barajar y priorizar los criterios adecuados: Tema, posicionamiento, visibilidad, receptividad para el tipo de trabajo que queremos publicar, etc.
    • Cuidar la relación con el editor o editores y con el soporte de edición. Con el soporte humano — responsables de edición, maquetación, estilo,… — y con el soporte tecnológico: La plataforma de edición, que hoy suele ser Open Journal System (OJS) pero hay otras, con su estructura de espacios y con el flujo de edición asistido.
    • Supone por último un dominio de los procesos de revisión. Hoy por la crisis de revisores, la mayor parte de las revistas de open Access, pero no sólo ellas, exigen como contraprestación el apoyo como revisores.
  • Difusión.- Una vez que se ha publicado hay que conseguir que el trabajo llegue a colegas y grupos que trabajan en el mismo tema. Hay que facilitar información sobre él y acceso de forma que sea utilizado de forma óptima por cuanta más gente lo necesite y pueda sacar provecho. Una medida de esto será obviamente la citación, y la influencia en otras investigaciones constituye el impacto. Para ello hay que
    • Colocar la publicación en bibliotecas, bases de datos, repositorios digitales,…
    • Hacerla llegar de forma selectiva a medios, equipos e investigadores relacionados o que trabajen sobre el mismo tema o que tengan interés en él.

Sin entrar todavía en el mundo de lo digital como espacio y conjunto de herramientas para la edición con medios digitales, es conveniente citar dos nuevas habilidades básicas y trasversales, no tanto por el nuevo mundo digital en el primer caso, como por el desarrollo de técnicas y de culturas basadas en el diseño, que tienen su justificación en la necesidad de organizar distintos métodos y visiones en la investigación. Se trata de las técnicas de investigación formativa y de investigación basada en el diseño, por un lado, y la gestión de redes y comunidades científicas específicas conectadas en la web social. En este caso se trata de habilidades de gestión de grupos y comunidades en redes y de gestión del flujo de la información y de la experticia. Como vemos esto está íntimamente ligado con lo anterior: Con el diseño de la investigación.

Entonces el esquema anterior se completa de la forma siguiente (figura 3):

Fig. 3

El carácter formativo (de proceso) de la investigación científica

Este carácter se manifiesta como hemos dicho  en  La investigación centrada en el diseño (Research Centered Design) y en La investigación formativa (Formative Research)

El desarrollo  y  la  eficacia  del  método  experimental  y del  contraste  de  hipótesis como  prueba  de    hechos  declarados  formalmente  como proposición  lógicas  o enunciados  matemáticos,  utilizado  al  principio  en  las  ciencias  llamadas positivas  y  luego  en  el  resto,  llegó  a  ser  un  rasgo  que  confería  a  un  saber  el carácter de ciencia, según sus defensores, es decir casi todos los investigadores.

Sin  embargo,  sin  desdeñar  estos  métodos    y  reconociendo  su  carácter  básico, hay  en  la  actualidad  numerosos    investigadores  que piensan  que  los  métodos tradicionales  otorgan a los dominios científicos una naturaleza fragmentada por un  lado,  y  no  dan  respuesta  a  la  naturaleza  dinámica  y  recurrente  de  ciertos procesos,  en  los  que  no  hace  falta  o  no  es  posible concluir  todas  las  fases  experimentales  para  obtener  conclusiones  efectivas.  Eso  sucede  por  ejemplo cuando  la  experimentación  se  realiza  sobre  la  aplicación  o  la  validez  de  un modelo instruccional, valga lo limitado del ejemplo.

De esta forma han surgido metodologías de investigación no tanto para aceptar o  rechazar  el  objeto  de  investigación  como  para  valorar  su  eficacia  y  obtener mejoras en función de ejecuciones progresivas y controladas.

Estos métodos o sistemas metodológicos no son exclusivamente cualitativos ni tan siquiera amatemáticos. En la mayor parte de los casos integran subtareas o elemento  de investigación del tipo anterior.

Estas formas de investigación se  aplican a  dominios  que tienen estructura de proceso, en muchos casos heurísticos que nos indican la forma de actuar frente a un dominio indiferenciado y dinámico de conocimientos. Lo que es frecuente en la sociedad de la información.

Entre  este  tipos  de  metodologías  de  investigación  destaca  la  investigación formativa (Reigeluth, C. M. & Frick, T. W. ,1999) pero no es menos importante el design  based  research   (DBR)  que  tiene  su  origen  en  los  trabajos  de  Allan Collins (1990) y a Ann Brown (1992), sistematizados por Sawyer (2006). Y que desarrollan Rinaudo,  M.C. y Donolo, D. (2010).

En este sentido, los diseños de teorías no son evaluados y validados en un solo acto de forma inmediata o simultánea a su elaboración. Tampoco la elaboración concluye  tras  la  primera  versión.  Su  validación  se realiza  en  la  práctica,  y  el modelo varía en un proceso de feed-back en función del análisis de la aplicación, de  resultados  parciales  y  de  consulta  a  expertos,  quienes  validan  el  modelo o indican  cambios. Se trata de un modelo de  investigación formativa (Reigeluth y Frick, 1999).

La  descripción  más  completa  y  la  justificación  de  esta  metodología  de investigación es la que hacen Reigeluth y Frick  (1999) en el libro citado, que podemos encontrar, junto una completa bibliografía, en su último capítulo. 

Como en todo lo demás de lo que estamos hablando estas metodologías de investigación tienen un carácter trasversal e interdisciplinar. También las habilidades necesarias para aplicarlas.

Gestión de redes y comunidades científicas específicas conectadas en la web social

Hay otras habilidades como hemos visto que cobran importancia en un contexto clásico, para los investigadores sin que tengan que ver de forma directa en cómo editan todavía. Estamos hablando de una habilidad que el investigador clásico puede utilizar y utiliza para difundir su producción, no para hacerla de forma nueva como preconizamos más adelante. Es la gestión de redes y comunidades científicas específicas conectadas en la web social. En este caso se trata de habilidades de gestión de grupos y comunidades en redes y de gestión del flujo de la información y de la experticia. Como vemos esto está íntimamente ligado con lo anterior: Con el la forma de trabajar en la investigación tal como se contempla en la visión y con en la metodología investigadora centrada en el diseño.

Hablemos pues de redes sociales. Tanto las clásicas: Linkedin, Twitter, Facebook (grupos), instagran,… como las adaptaciones de esta que se hicieron.

La Red Iris fue un gran soporte a la investigación científica con sus listas de distribución desde el principio de Internet en 1995. En esta época, a propuesta de algunos propietarios incorpora una red social propia, Zyncro

Fig. 4

Fig. 5

Red que cae en desuso con la generalización de las redes científicas específicas: Mendeley, ResearchGate y Academia.edu

Hoy la estamos recuperando por la riqueza de sus archivos para la historia de la actividad científica.

Posteriormente el esfuerzo institucional y voluntario  de estas redes se hace inviable sin el concurso de las poderosas corporaciones editoriales, como ha sucedido con el caso de Elsevier para Mendeley. Sin embargo y de paso el efecto ha sido el contrario: han aparecido métricas alternativas basadas en el impacto a través de la web social, vinculado en este caso precisamente con la competencia del propio patrocinador, como ha sucedió con Almetrics, vinculada con Mendeley, que es la red de Elsevier, patrocinadora de Almetrics. En este complejo marco nos movemos y es vital que los autores-investigadores disponga de métodoas y estrategias adecuados a sus objetivos.

Las métricas alternativas veremos que son interesantes, no sólo como difusoras del trabajo científico y su reutilización en otras investigaciones, sino que además nos dan importantes informaciones cualitativas del uso de esos resultados, del debate que generan y sobre todo de su relevancia. Recordemos que las métricas tradicionales no distinguen citas de relleno, para engordar el indicador y citas que son centrales en otras investigaciones. Veamos algunos ejemplos:

Fig. 6 Uso de donuts

Fig.7 Uso de dimensiones

Fig. 8 Ejemplo de insignia de Almetrics (donut) sobre citación en un blog académico (RED de Hypotheses y en Mendeley).

Entre los cien artículos con más alto índice en Almetrics (top 100) en 2018 podemos ver

Fig.9  Almetrics del artículo #33 del top 100 en 2018.

Con el número de incidencias en el donut y con el enlace a la información completa, podemos ilustrar el sitio original del artículo, si hemos incrustado previamente el código HTML, como después veremos:

Fig.10 el donut en el sitio original del artículo, si hemos incrustado previamente el código HTML.

Actualmente el sistema de análisis de impacto de ResearchGate es un serio competidos de IF y de H o H5 (Delgado López-Cózar & Orduña Malea, 2019).

La ventaja de esta red social con respecto a Academia.edu por ejemplo, es que además genera DOI propios.

En este panorama social cabe destacar tres aspectos que contribuyen especialmente no sólo a la difusión científica, sino a una nueva forma de elaboración: La elaboración compartida (que no atenta ni perjudica para nada la atribución de la autoría u otros derechos clásicos), son las sessions, los preprints y otras formas de materia gris (incluir también los datos y autoarchivos) y los blogs académicos como forma particular de edición científica.

Otra herramienta interesante de las redes sociales son las sessions. Son espacios donde se combinan las potencialidades de las redes sociales con las de la edición científica. Un precedente está en los entornos de edición científica de Google Scholar (Google Drive combinado con Google Scholar, o en la edición colaborativa,

Fig. 11 Editando un documento sobre pensamiento computacional en Google Drive con la opción de explorar y de citar.

Pero ahora con el enorme potencial de las redes sociales científicas, y los repositorios de trabajos científicos como en este caso es Academia.edu.

Las sessions ofrecen el documento en el lado izquierdo de la pantalla y una sección de comentarios en la derecha que permite a los espectadores comentar y ofrecer anotaciones en secciones individuales o incluso párrafos visibles para todos los que las lean. Sessions le da a los revisores solo 20 días para ingresar y hacer sus comentarios. Además son comentarios públicos para el grupo pero reservados de las búsquedas de Google, y que quedan permanentemente pero bajo el control del autor.

Hoy las tienen casi todas las redes pero inicialmente fueron de Academia.edu

Fig.12

En el apartado de affordances sociales podemos incluir igualmente los preprints y otras formas de materia gris, incluyendo entre ellas los datos que se van generando en la investigación como materiales en bruto y comentados y el propio autoarchivos de los artículos. Todo ello l podemos considerar como web social y utilizarlo para las formas tradicionales de editar, sin perjuicio de que luego lo desarrollemos más como métodos específicos de la edición en la Sociedad del Conocimiento)

Los preprints están constituidos por versiones no definitivas de artículos, paperd u otros elementos escritos de difusión o bien los datos que les acompañan. Entre los ejemplos de plataformas más utilizadas están Open Science Framework (OSF), que es el de ORCID, arXiv, que es el clásico de Matemáticas y ciencias duras y e-LiS. No se trata de utilizarlos todos sino aquél que más útil resulte a nuestros propósitos, por ser por eejmplo el que más investigadores y trabajos tenga en nuestra disciplina.

Fig. 13 Volcados de pantalla de algunas plataformas eprints y preprints

Por último los blogs académicos cierran este capítulo dedicado a la web social académica.

Los blogs académicos tienen las mismas características de los artículos: temas, estructura, estilo,… pero tienen el carácter más ligero y más efímero que tienen los blogs y en general la web 2.0. Permiten la interacción con los lectores y usuarios a través de comentarios, la reedición, los enlaces hipertextuales, etc. Normalmente el tema de un post suele ser bastante más restringido y limitado que el de un paper, y no se es tan cuidadoso con aspectos que en un artículo son más definitivos. Son temas que habitualmente se lanzan sometidos al debate y a la crítica y que eventualmente después pueden dar lugar a un artículo completo o a una parte sustancial de éste.

Un ejemplo es el blog académico RED. El aprendizaje en la Sociedad del Conocimiento.

Fig. 14 Página del blog RED y de edición del blog de Hypotheses.

En particular el blog RED es el vehículo de difusión y revisión de los trabajos a publicar en la revista RED y para difundir, revisar y discutir los resultados y trabajos del titular y de otros autores.

Sus objetivos son pues apoyar y permitir la discusión de los temas propios de la revista RED. Hace pues suyos los objetivos de la revista.
Además de estos son también temas del blog los de las líneas de la actividad investigadora del titular, Miguel Zapata-Ros, en el seno de sus programas de Doctorado, Máster, y de su equipo de investigación. Actualmente las líneas son:

  • Diseño instruccional
  • Secuenciación de contenidos
  • Calidad en sistemas virtuales de gestión del aprendizaje.
  • Aprendizaje en entornos sociales y ubicuos
  • El aprendizaje y el cambio de paradigma educativo en la Sociedad Postindustrial del Conocimiento.

Es muy significativo acceder a los blogs que están en el catálogo de Open Edition y observar su naturaleza y sus características.

Fig.15 Página de blogs del catálogo deHypotheses

Como es el de RED, que está dentro de la colección Hypotheses. En particular RED está en el catálogo por cumplir los correspondientes requisitos de excelencia, y cuyos posts son seleccionados en la página principal del catálogo como publicaciones destacadas.

Fig.16 RED en el catálogo de Hypotheses, en Open Education.

Esta colección de blogs se incluye en una plataforma más amplia que reúne cuatro plataformas dedicadas a recursos electrónicos en humanidades y ciencias sociales: blogs, libros y colecciones de libros, revistas académicas y eventos. Es la iniciativa Open Edition.

La naturaleza de elaboración académica orientada a un trabajo investigación que señalamos se puede ver claramente en las secciones francesa o alemana de Hypotheses, y no tanto en la española, donde se utiliza más para funciones de tipo de difusión de biblioteconomía, para tratar aspectos parciales de técnicas, herramientas o problemas de  la edición digital, o incluso en aspectos relacionados con aspectos profesionales de los investigadores o autores que para una actividad científica de la señalada.

Seguimos pues desarrollando  un marco general  de las competencias que deben tener los investigadores como autores y editores. Hasta aquí hemos hablado de las competencias clásicas, las que ya eran necesarias antes.

Ahora vamos a hablar de las nuevas competencias de la Sociedad del Conocimiento para estos mismos actores y sus funciones, y de entre éstas vamos a distinguir   a) por un lado competencias clásicas,  en los nuevos entornos y b) las competencias nuevas, singulares y nucleares de la edición en entornos digitales.

Empezaremos por las primeras.

Competencias de la Sociedad del Conocimiento, para investigadores como autores y editores: I Competencias clásicas en los nuevos entornos

La Sociedad del Conocimiento, sus entornos, sus redes, la nueva cultura y la nueva epistemología que en torno a ella o soportada por sus affordances se crea, posibilita confiere una nueva dimensión y unas nuevas posibilidades que contribuyen a potenciar las tareas y habilidades clásicas del investigador. Así que hemos visto, clasificadas en competencias investigadoras propias de la disciplina, las de publicación y las de difusión se ven enriquecidas de la siguiente forma:

A las propias de la disciplina (Competencias investigadoras específicas, diseño de experimentos y de análisis empírico) a las de gestión privada de datos o de fuentes) y a las competencias de interacciones con otros investigadores y otros equipos, limitada al tema y al método de investigación mediante métodos clásicos (Correo, intercambio de ficheros, pruebas, borradores,.. Etc) se une una nueva familia competencias: LAS COMPETENCIAS DE CURACIÓN DE RECURSOS DE INVESTIGACIÓN Y LA METACOGNICIÓN.

A las de publicación, como es el dominio en la técnica para elaborar un artículo u otro elemento de comunicación, se añade LA GESTION DE PLANTILLAS Y ESTÁNDARES, ahora con las referencias en la red y las herramientas nuevas de edición, aplicadas a los distintos tipos de artículos, y de otras elaboraciones; las claves comunicativas específicas (Análisis empírico, estado del arte,…); la estructura y los estilos (APA, Vancouver, ISO 690, MLA,…)

También constituye una habilidad distinta la selección del medio o de la revista donde publicar. Ahora se hace con el USO DE HERRAMIENTAS CON MÉTRICAS DE IMPACTO Y CITACIÓN POR DOMINIOS ESPECIFICOS

Por último cambia la relación con el editor y/o con el soporte de edición (aparecen nuevas plataformas, como OJS, y otros medios automáticos de edición). En esos mismos medios y plataformas tiene lugar una nueva forma de revisión por pares. Con un flujo de edición nuevo y distinto, con nuevas posibilidades y requerimientos.

A las habilidades de difusión clásicas, como es colocar la publicación en bibliotecas, bases de datos, repositorios digitales, …, se añade la gestión y conocimiento de RECURSOS EN LA RED: REPOSITORIOS Y BASES DE DATOS. METADATOS Y CADENAS DE REPOSITORIOS Y DE HOMOLOGACIONES Y ESTÁNDARES.

Se trata con ello de hacer llegar nuestra publicación a medios, equipos e investigadores relacionados o que trabajen sobre el mismo tema, o que tengan interés en él, ahora con los medios de redes. Así aparece la  GESTION DE COMUNIDADES CIENTIFICAS PARA DIFUSIÓN VISIBILIDAD Y COOPERACIÓN y de nuevo la CURACIÓN Y METACOGNICIÓN, pero no como antes para buscar la publicación adecuada, sino para difundir el paper o la investigación.

Para todas estas tareas hay herramientas de análisis que utilizadas eficientemente nos proporcionan una gran ventaja y ahorro de tiempo y esfuerzo. La más conocida de las cuales es Harzig Publishs or perish

Fig. 17 Cuadro de dialogo y resultados de Harzig Publishs or perish

Competencias nuevas y nucleares de la edición en entornos digitales.

Se trata de  las competencias nuevas, singulares y nucleares de la edición en entornos digitales. Y son, dentro del propio trabajo de difusión en interacción, en el propio progreso de investigación y de manera formativa como hemos visto:

  • La gestión social de comunidades y de la dinámicas que se produce en los medios sociales científicos en la fase de desarrollo de la investigación (preprints, literatura gris,… Autoarchivo verde). También en los blogs académicos y sessions.
  • La gestión social de comunidades y dinámicas de los medios sociales científicos en la fase de difusión del artículo. Que es sustancialmente diferente de la anterior.
  • El dominio de las tecnología y de las habilidades editoriales que favorecen la difusión y el uso de la investigación compartida
  • La generación eficiente de los DOI para favorecer la detección temprana y la gestión por los harversters.
  • La generación y explotación eficiente y oportuna de los DOI y métricas alternativas para favorecer la difusión en proceso de los resultados, con carácter social.
  • Saber utilizar convenientemente la edición sin mediación, y percibir las ventajas de la edición con mediación tecnológica, y en qué fase se va a utilizar una u otra.
  • Dinamizar en general la web social y los entornos sociales de investigación

No podemos eludir en el cambio en la forma de trabajar los científicos que supone la web social. Esta idea es clave. Y la puso de manifiesto, en la idea de algunos, un hecho histórico la resolución del Último Problema de Fermat, y el trabajo de grupos de matemáticos unidos por el correo electrónico y las listas de discusión (precedente claro de la web social). De ellos hay testimonios, en particular de los mensajes entre revisores y autores en función del fallo detectado en la primera presentación de la demostración del Último teorema de Fermat[3], también de la pugna entre Andrew Wile y André Weil  por atribuirse el resultado, en función de la denuncia de éste último por un resultado (la Conjetura Shimura- Taniyama – Weil) que hacía falta para los últimos pasos de la demostración del Último Teorema de Fermat (O’Connor y Robertson, febrero de 1996) (Zapata-Ros & Lizenberg, 2011).

Desde la resolución del problema que planteaba la Ecuación de Fermat hasta nuestros días es imposible contextualizar la edición científica y la difusión de la ciencia sin tener en cuenta la difusión, y la revisión, en el mismo proceso de la investigación. Edición, revisión e investigación son tres facetas indisociables y síncronas, que se retroalimentan, en esta nueva naturaleza del trabajo de los investigadores.

En este trabajo ocupa un papel y un espacio importante  el análisis de la web social como contexto de trabajo para la investigación científica y los rasgos metodológicos que confieren estos entornos al trabajo de los investigadores. Se hace una propuesta de los conceptos y características de e-Ciencia,  Ciencia 2.0 y ciencia compartida.  Así como la proyección que estas habilidades de los investigadores tienen sobre la edición en una fase que es síncrona con la de la propia investigación, discurre paralela a ella, como es la de elaboración de hipótesis, borradores, preprints y el autoarchivo.

Una vez que hayamos hecho un repaso sobre las competencias necesarias para los investigadores como editores y difusores en los entornos digitales que proporciona la sociedad digital, la sociedad red, y cómo obtener de ellos y de las estrategias adecuadas el máximo provecho, también echaremos un repaso sobre los nuevos entornos virtuales de investigación, los nuevos ecosistemas de los investigadores.

Se trata, en este caso, de profundizar en los rasgos que confiere la web social a los entornos virtuales de investigación  (Virtual Research Environments, VREs) (Zapata-Ros, 2011), pero también a los de edición, en función de la  naturaleza compartida de la ciencia y de la investigación. Se hace especial énfasis en el apoyo a la edición científica digital, sobre todo en la fase de revisión por pares como revisión social, y se hace una propuesta de revisión a través de las redes sociales. Veremos que también hay críticas de los medios científicos más conservadores, y otros basados en la propiedad intelectual, sin embargo esas dudas desaparecen cundo las legislaciones aceptan y protegen las licencias CC o similares.

En este punto se recogen algunos de los reparos más frecuentes presentados, sobre todo en áreas experimentales

Finalmente se pone de relieve, en este sentido, la necesidad de contar con la información viva de la investigación que hay más allá de lo publicado y que está en “la nube”. Y se concluye señalando la necesidad de que las agencias e instituciones de investigación contemplen en la financiación y en los proyectos, además del apoyo a la edición abierta, las infraestructuras de edición digital en entornos y con estándares de comunicación con la web social.

Conclusión

Para favorecer un rendimiento óptimo de la investigación y una eficiencia, no sólo de la difusión, sino de la interacción y de los retornos en los procesos y de los resultados es necesaria una robusta formación en habilidades investigadoras, y editoras. Pero con referencia ahora a las que se emplean en entornos digitales y sociales de investigación y de edición. Entornos que son ya no solo los singulares y diferentes, sino que son los habituales, los propios de la sociedad del conocimiento.

Esta formación debe ocupar un lugar prioritario en las estrategias de las universidades y de los centros de investigación.  Deben poner en marcha un centro y programas adecuados de capacitación,como sucede en las universidades de excelencia.

Mejorar el posicionamiento en rankings y obtener mejores indicadores de impacto, citación y de posicionamiento de autores, equipos y publicaciones, es algo que vendrá por añadidura.

1.     La edición y la publicación: Procesos y actores en presencia.

Presentación.- La comunicación científica , indicadores de impacto y calidad

Es importante distinguir el concepto de comunicación científica como algo holístico, sistémico, de otro concepto —el vigente—  más fragmentado, en el que se integran como hechos diferenciados y frecuentemente sin comunicación entre ellos, artículos, libros, capítulas de libro, comunicaciones a congresos, preprints, web social, etc.

En la perspectiva de la sociedad del conocimiento, todo va unido, y el hilo conductor es lo sustantivo del hallazgo, o la contribución al conocimiento, que se quiere comunicar, y no distinguible claramente del proceso de investigación como algo distinto de él. De manera que entre todo lo demás hay flujos de comunicación y desempeñan funciones y facetas de un mismo proceso indiferenciado. Cada uno de esos recursos o materiales de comunicación presentan aspectos y situaciones distintas de la investigación. Tienen unos objetivos y destinatarios distintos en situaciones diferentes. No es lo mismo un preprint de un artículo, que supuestamente se ha realizado después de la investigación principal, o de algunas de sus fases más importantes, y que se presenta a la comunidad en un proceso encaminado a obtener la versión definitiva del artículo, que las galeradas de éste, o que el propio artículo ya depositado en periodo de embargo de la revista y de la editorial. En los casos anteriores se puede someter a la discusión por pares en sessions. También es diferente de un post académico que anuncia una investigación a través de sus objetivos o de sus tesis para propiciar que otros autores digan en qué estado están sus investigaciones si son convergentes o coincidentes, que manifiesten qué problemas encontraron y si son irresolubles o los fueron para ellos, etc etc.  

Todo ello está inmerso en un proceso que ya enunciamos en ña presentación, en la figura 1.

Esta perspectiva ataca y cuestiona a un hecho que se tiene por intangibles, casi por tabú, en la última etapa tal como se concibe en el modelo industrial de producción científica que está concluyendo, que son los indicadores de impacto y de citación.

Todo el proceso que estamos señalando no es resumible sólo en indicadores de impacto ni en métricas alternativas por ejemplo por separado, sino que tiene entidad en conjunto, de forma holística. Esa idea es la que vamos a poner de relieve a lo largo del trabajo.

De esta forma la comunicación científica, incluyendo en este concepto todas las formas de comunicación que acompañan y están inmersas en el proceso de investigación considerado en conjunto, tiene como ejes los objetivos que se plantea como propios, en este sentido no es muy diferente del modelo tradicional,  pero eventualmente echará mano de aspectos formativos y centrados en el diseño, pero también habrá momentos que sea preciso con carácter instrumental saber la posición y la relevancia que tiene en el contexto global de la investigación en el panorama de su disciplina o de su área de conocimiento y que le suministrará información sobre tendencias de interés y relevancia en ellas mediante los indicadores de impacto y de citación. En ese sentido se hace imprescindible conocerlos afondo en sus características, y cuál es la información que nos dan, para utilizarlos de forma adecuada a los fines y al tipo información que vamos a utilizar o dónde vamos a publicar. En el apartado correspondiente hablaremos pues de al menos los 56 indicadores que contempla se incluyen en el LSE impact blog (Holbrook, June 12th, 2013)


[1] Según Gibson una affordance es «una posibilidad de acción disponible en el entorno de una persona, independientemente de la capacidad del individuo para percibir esta posibilidad» (Gibson, 1986) (McGrenere y Ho, 2000).

Aunque no sea un trabajo de educación ni de tecnología aplicada a al aprendizaje creemos ilustrativo a este caso traer el concepto de affordance y su sentido tal como lo aplicamos en ese dominio (Zapata-Ros, 2014). Este constructo, la affordance, es muy versátil en educación y en tecnología educativa. Incorpora un campo distinto entre el uso de la tecnología, pensando en su destino al ser creada, y el uso subordinado a la teoría educativa. 

Hay pues un campo muy extenso de usos nuevos por la interacción de ambos ámbitos: Son las affordances educativas.

Esta idea se ha visto reflejada (Kirschner, 2013) en el contexto de la investigación en la educación. Así el término «affordance educativa» ha adquirido un significado que se relaciona con “la respuesta a la búsqueda de expresar las propiedades de un entorno que, al interactuar con un usuario, mejora el potencial de aprendizaje”. En palabras de Kirschner (2002, p.14) :

«Affordances educativas son las características de un artefacto (por ejemplo, cómo se implementa un paradigma educativo determinado) que determinan si una modalidad particular de aprendizaje podría ser asumida en un contexto determinado (por ejemplo, trabajar un proyecto en equipo, establecer una comunidad de aprendizaje distribuido) y cómo se produce.”.

[2] En el resto del trabajo dedicaremos puntos específicos a este tema pero desde aquí ya recomendamos algunas lecturas sobre la investigación centrada en el diseño y la investigación formativa

Frick, CMRTW, y Reigeluth, CM (1992). Investigación formativa: una metodología para crear y mejorar las teorías de diseño. Obtenido julio , 10 , 2011. https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/30446411/26formres.pdf?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAIWOWYYGZ2Y53UL3A&Expires=1556092525&Signature=oEjXqkOXXm1vYa2HFF%2BkeTqX5nM%3D&response-content-disposition=inline%3B%20filename%3DFormative_Research_A_Methodology_for_Cre.pdf

Reigeluth,  Ch.  M.  y  Frick,  T.  W.  (1999).  Investigación  formativa:  una  metodología  para

crear  y mejorar teorías de  diseño.  En C. M. Reigeluth (Ed.)  Diseño de la  instrucción. Teorías y modelos. Un nuevo paradigma de la teoría

de  la  instrucción (Parte II, 181-100). Madrid: Aula XXI. Santillana.

Rinaudo, M. C., & Donolo, D. (2010). Estudios de diseño. Una perspectiva prometedora en la investigación educativa. Revista de educación a distancia, (22). http://revistas.um.es/red/article/view/111631

[3] JJ O’Connor y EF Robertson, febrero de 1996 . Fermat’s last theorem. Number Theory Index. History Topics Indexhttps://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/HistTopics/Fermat’s_last_theorem.html  

Citado como: NEW, W. S. Encyclopedia> Fermat’s last theorem. O también como

O’Connor, JJ y Robertson, EF (febrero de 1996). El último teorema de Fermat. En Turnbull WWW Server, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas y Computacionales de la Universidad de St Andrews. Obtenido de http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/HistTopics/Fermat’s_last_theorem.html

La demostración en su versión definitiva, y firmada por Andrews Wile está en
https://www.jstor.org/stable/2118559?casa_token=LWu-0Ru_5r0AAAAA:tU2yeRdEwIyo0bQ237Px1s9q21YWlTs-nOzjqRxdMoagSEM2o_IxPRaXqY5IcBd9u4Gheea-jYdSyYXPqV87rzZ1pb1BNHiJasDORpqpMC02eAfGtr4&seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents

Y se cita como
Wiles, A. (1995). Modular elliptic curves and Fermat’s last theorem. Annals of mathematics141(3), 443-551.

Es particularmente relevante que Wiles anuncia una prueba de la demostración y un revisor, Dr. Karl Rubin, profesor de matemáticas en la Universidad Estatal de Ohio en Columbus, encuentra un fallo. Esto induce a retirar la prueba presentada ya en una conferencia en Cambridge. Finalmente el problema de la falta de un paso en la conferencia de Cambridge, lo se resuelve con la ayuda de de un ex alumno, el Dr. Richard Lawrence Taylor de la Universidad de Cambridge en Inglaterra. Taylor no aparece sin embargo en el artículo final, citado más arriba.

El relato del caso y los email originales están en estos dos enlaces:

…While a Mathematician Calls Classic Riddle Solved, By GINA KOLATAOCT. 27, 1994 https://www.nytimes.com/1994/10/27/us/while-a-mathematician-calls-classic-riddle-solved.html

Another Step Toward Fermat, http://www.ams.org/notices/199501/rubin.pdf

De ello se hizo eco incluso el diario El País en 1994 https://elpais.com/diario/1994/06/30/sociedad/772927204_850215.html

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159). Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria. Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York. Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

¿Qué tipo de innovaciones necesitamos en la educación?

 

Klinge Orlando Villalba-Condori

Universidad Nacional de San Agustín de Arequipa, PERU

Francisco José García-Peñalvo

Full Professor, Computer Science Department, Research Institute for Educational Sciences, University of Salamanca, GRIAL Research Group

University of Salamanca, SPAIN

Jari Lavonen

Professor, Director of the National Teacher Education Reform Program

University of Helsinki, FINLAND

Miguel Zapata-Ros

Universidad de Murcia, ESPAÑA

RED, Editor

Miembro del  Interuniversity Institute of International Economics

ISSN 2386-8562

Este artículo está bajo una licencia de Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0

Debe ser citado como

Villalba-Condori, K. et al (2019) ¿Qué tipo de innovaciones necesitamos en la educación? Blog RED de Hypotheses. El aprendizaje en la Sociedad del Conocimiento.  https://red.hypotheses.org/1782

Prólogo de las Actas del Congreso Internacional sobre Tendencias en Innovación Educativa, CITIE 2018

Nos complace contribuir con este prólogo al Congreso Internacional sobre Tendencias en Innovación Educativa, CITIE 2018. El congreso ha creado un ambiente entusiasta en el que los académicos pueden discutir las innovaciones educativas y su naturaleza. Dominó una actitud muy positiva en las discusiones, y muchos participantes preguntaban: ‘¿Podemos mejorar las cosas?’ En este tipo de discusión, es importante que conozcamos los desafíos en nuestro contexto educativo, así como los procesos que son apropiados para seguir en la transferencia o implementación de estas innovaciones a nuestro propio contexto.

En todos los países, los desafíos en educación se discuten en varios foros, conferencias y comités curriculares a nivel nacional. Los desafíos pueden reconocerse sobre la base de estudios comparativos internacionales, como las encuestas de la OCDE, PISA [1] y TALIS [2] y los informes de monitoreo a nivel nacional. Además, es importante que los desafíos educativos se analicen desde la perspectiva de la sociedad, incluidos los cambios en la vida laboral, las brechas de género y el medio ambiente (por ejemplo, el cambio climático). Estos desafíos que se reconozcan pueden resumirse de diferentes maneras y en diferentes niveles.

Los desafíos pueden clasificarse, por ejemplo, a nivel de estudiante, aula, a nivel escolar, a nivel municipal y, así como a nivel de la sociedad. En la mayoría de los países, los políticos y los maestros no están contentos con el nivel de resultados de aprendizaje y la gran variación en esos resultados; la variación en los resultados de aprendizaje entre las escuelas se considera un indicio de desigualdad en el sistema educativo. Otro desafío común a nivel de los estudiantes es la falta de participación (interés) en el aprendizaje y, más en general, la falta de bienestar mental. La falta de interés de los estudiantes en los estudios y carreras de Ciencias, Tecnología, Ingeniería y Matemáticas (STEM) [3] se ha considerado específicamente como un desafío serio tanto para el individuo como para la sociedad.

Ha habido discusiones en muchos países sobre la enseñanza y el aprendizaje de las competencias genéricas y del siglo XXI [4]. El aprendizaje de estas competencias representa un desafío a nivel del aula y se refiere a la redefinición de los objetivos educativos y las formas de organizar el aprendizaje en un aula con el fin de satisfacer las demandas del futuro. Estas competencias se han definido de varias maneras (por ejemplo, ver un análisis en [5]). El proyecto DeSeCo de la OCDE [6] analizó las competencias del siglo XXI en el contexto de la vida laboral futura y reconoció que las personas necesitan poder utilizar una amplia gama de herramientas, incluidas las herramientas socioculturales (lenguaje) y digitales (tecnológicas), para interactuar de manera efectiva con el medio ambiente, participar e interactuar en un grupo heterogéneo, participar en el trabajo orientado a la investigación y la resolución de problemas y, además, actuar de manera autónoma y asumir la responsabilidad de administrar sus propias vidas. En este contexto, así como en el contexto de trabajo, el pensamiento crítico y creativo, y el aprendizaje, son necesarios para que uno pueda desarrollar competencias. Aunque DeSeCo se enfoca en las necesidades de la vida laboral, sus ideas pueden interpretarse en el contexto de la escuela. Según esta interpretación, es importante recordar que los estudiantes son novatos y aún están aprendiendo estas competencias. En consecuencia, el profesor debe apoyar a los estudiantes en el aprendizaje de las competencias del siglo XXI a través de procesos de aprendizaje activo y colaborativo en los diversos entornos de aprendizaje. Otro desafío a nivel del aula es el apoyo de los alumnos como individuos y la organización de un aula heterogénea y multicultural que respalde los procesos de aprendizaje de varios alumnos.

En los niveles de la escuela y la ciudad, existen desafíos en la planificación del plan de estudios local o el plan de trabajo anual y en los entornos de aprendizaje físico y digital de los equipos de maestros y redes de maestros. Para superar este tipo de desafío, se necesita un liderazgo pedagógico de alta calidad para apoyar la colaboración y el desarrollo profesional de los maestros.

A nivel de la sociedad, la inteligencia artificial y la robotización están cambiando la vida laboral; las tareas o responsabilidades y roles de trabajo desaparecen y cambian y, además, aparecen nuevas tareas y roles sobre los que aún no sabemos. Las habilidades de pensamiento computacional (PC) [7,8,9] se han determinado como una competencia clave para los estudiantes preuniversitarios [10,11]. Sin embargo, debido a la definición difusa de PC [12], muchas voces defienden un enfoque más pragmático basado en la codificación de la enseñanza [13], utilizando robots [14,15,16] o construyendo cosas [16,17] ( Por ejemplo, consulte el proyecto de la UE TACCLE 3 – Codificación de resultados, en [18]; TACCLE 3 Consortium [19]). Además, hay propuestas que abogan por incluir la programación [20] o las asignaturas de ciencias de la computación [21,22] en el currículo oficial preuniversitario. La introducción del PC y/o informática/programación en las escuelas tiene un desafío importante en este contexto: la capacitación de maestros desde educación primaria hasta preuniversitaria [23,24,25].

Otro ejemplo de un desafío a nivel de la sociedad, relacionado con los cambios en la vida laboral y la empleabilidad [26,27,28], es el número de jóvenes que abandonan tanto la educación, como el mercado laboral. Además, existe la necesidad de capacitar continuamente a los adultos para reflejar los cambios en la vida laboral, como la digitalización.

Para avanzar y superar estos desafíos, se necesitan programas de reforma a nivel nacional. Sin embargo, el diseño y la implementación de un programa nacional de reforma es un proceso complejo. Por ejemplo, Beach, Bagley, Eriksson y Player-Koro [29], reconocieron, basándose en su análisis de políticas a largo plazo de Suecia, que las reformas suecas son lideradas solo por los gobiernos: «los gobiernos a menudo se ven tentados a imponer su ideología sobre los intereses del conocimiento científico ‘(p. 167). Además, es común que los objetivos del programa de reforma no tengan en cuenta los resultados de la investigación en este campo. La OCDE [30] ha sugerido que, en un contexto de estrategia nacional, ciertas características son importantes. Sin embargo, la lista de la OCDE no incluye la orientación de la investigación en la planificación y la implementación, ni tampoco incluye la garantía de calidad continua (QA), que incluye, por ejemplo, una recopilación de datos de la información y el progreso de los proyectos piloto. Además, en la colaboración y las reuniones que apoyan los proyectos nacionales pilotos se comunican los resultados de estos a otros proyectos pilotos y reflexionan sobre los resultados. Una lista actualizada de la OCDE explica los requisitos para avanzar y superar los desafíos reconocidos a nivel nacional:

  • Tener tiempo suficiente para la planificación, un cronograma cuidadoso y su implementación;
  • Involucrar a las partes interesadas, como instituciones de educación, y emplear a organizaciones que participen en el diseño de la estrategia;
  • Involucrar a los investigadores para implementen activamente el conocimiento, basado en la investigación, en el diseño de la estrategia;
  • Estar en asociación con el sindicato de docentes y el sindicato de empleo;
  • Luchar por el consenso en el diseño;
  • Proveer recursos sostenibles para la planificación e implementación de la estrategia;
  • Planifique proyectos piloto de acuerdo con la estrategia y tome en cuenta el conocimiento basado en la investigación al planificar e implementar proyectos pilotos, aprender de estos, modificar los objetivos estratégicos (si es necesario) y, además, usar los proyectos pilotos para implementar la estrategia. Los investigadores deben alentar a los proyectos pilotos a participar y utilizar recursos sostenibles en los mismos;
  • Difundir los resultados de los proyectos pilotos.

Este tipo de enfoque para la implementación de reformas educativas tiene muchos beneficios tanto en el diseño como en la implementación de la estrategia. Este enfoque hace posible que las reformas sean aceptadas e implementadas. El compromiso de los interesados aumenta su pertinencia y ayuda con la implementación. Además, es esencial que sus criterios e ideas sean reflejados y considerados durante la implementación de las prácticas educativas. Planeamos hacerlo con el propósito de aumentar la eficiencia del aprendizaje y la satisfacción de los actores e instituciones involucrados a través de la personalización y la adaptabilidad [31,32], que son las características y objetivos más importantes de los entornos de aprendizaje y están respaldados no solo por las tecnologías sociales y ubicuas, sino también por la detección y la recomendación.

Necesitamos una respuesta a un hecho indiscutible: el uso de tecnologías inteligentes [33] como un medio poderoso para adaptar e incluir el apoyo en la entrega de ayuda y recursos de manera relevante y pertinente para el personal. [34] y el aprendizaje en grupo [35], así como la demanda de conocimientos y habilidades de los estudiantes.

Se necesita un marco de modelo pedagógico, diseño instruccional y guías que integren a los estudiantes y ayuden a alcanzar resultados de aprendizaje comunes y deseables. También planteamos la necesidad de analizar las condiciones necesarias para su validación. Finalmente, proponemos la necesidad de respuestas concretas a la insuficiencia y consecuencias resultantes de las políticas institucionales que contemplan estas modalidades de integración, que se pueden lograr a través de un análisis basado en las experiencias.

Estamos acostumbrados a la literatura que enfatiza las posibilidades de una educación adaptativa, así como las posibilidades de los grandes volumenes de datos (big data), combinados con algoritmos, para crear oportunidades únicas y sin precedentes para que las organizaciones académicas enseñen estándares más altos y enfoques innovadores. Sin embargo, actualmente hay una falta de propuestas pedagógicas sistematizadas.

En última instancia, proponemos mejorar las siguientes líneas de desarrollo [32]:

  • Estrategias de aprendizaje y enseñanza para una pedagogía social e inteligente y ubicua [36];
  • Servicios altamente tecnológicos y singulares respaldados por ecosistemas tecnológicos [37,38,39], ambos para estudiantes locales en el campus y estudiantes remotos en línea, para crear ecologías de aprendizaje dentro de las cuales el conocimiento puede ser creado, administrado, transformado y transferido [40];
  • Configuraciones de aulas y centros innovadores y adaptables que facilitan las interacciones locales/remotas entre estudiantes y maestros;
  • Diseño y desarrollo de contenidos multimedia enriquecidos con presentaciones interactivas, videoconferencias, cuestionarios y evaluaciones que permitan una evaluación instantánea e individualizada;
  • Otras posibilidades y entornos gestionados con tecnología y software adaptativo;
  • Un uso ético del aprendizaje y la analítica académica para aumentar el apoyo brindado a los estudiantes y administradores académicos en relación con sus procesos de aprendizaje y toma de decisiones, respectivamente [41,42];
  • Una incorporación, reconocimiento y mezcla más natural de los procesos de aprendizaje informal en la educación formal [43].

Como mencionamos anteriormente, hemos aprendido sobre varias innovaciones educativas de varios países durante el CITIE 2018. Ahora, nuestro deber es analizar cómo podemos beneficiarnos de esas innovaciones dentro de nuestro propio contexto educativo. Por lo tanto, debemos analizar nuestros desafíos educativos y luego modificar la innovación para satisfacer nuestras necesidades locales de acuerdo con los desafíos reconocidos. Además, es importante que encontremos formas adecuadas de apoyar la transferencia de innovación. En general, la transferencia de innovación educativa de un contexto a otro se ha considerado un desafío. La transferencia exitosa requiere una colaboración y un desarrollo sólido dentro de un ambiente abierto y de confianza en función de las características locales del contexto. En el área de educación, las características locales incluyen la orientación pedagógica de los docentes, sus creencias sobre la enseñanza y el aprendizaje, y el liderazgo y apoyo disponible para ellos en la institución. Además, el contexto educativo del país (por ejemplo, el plan de estudios, el nivel de responsabilidad, la política y la inspección escolar) influye en las decisiones de los docentes al considerar la adopción de la innovación. En consecuencia, la transferencia de una innovación educativa se considera una tarea compleja y altamente contextualizada.

Referencias

  1. PISA 2012. Results in focus. What 15-year-olds know and what they can do with what they know. Paris: OECD (2013).
  2. Talis 2013 Results: An international perspective on teaching and learning. Paris: OECD Publishing. (2014).
  3. Ramírez-Montoya, M. S. (Ed.). Handbook of research on driving STEM learning with educational technologies. Hershey PA, USA: IGI Global. (2017).
  4. Ananiadou, K., & Claro, M. 21st century skills and competences for new millennium learners in OECD Countries. OECD Education Working Papers, 41. (2009).
  5. Voogt, J. & Roblin, N.P. A comparative analysis of international frameworks for 21st century competences: Implications for national curriculum policies. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 44(3), 299–321. (2012). doi:10.1080/00220272.2012.668938
  6. Definition and selection of competencies (DeSeCo): Executive summary. Paris: OECD Publishing. (2005).
  7. Wing, J. M. Computational thinking. Communications of the ACM, 49(3), 33–35. (2006). doi:10.1145/1118178.1118215
  8. Zapata-Ros, M. Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED, Revista de Educación a distancia, 46. (2015).
  9. García-Peñalvo, F. J., & Mendes, J. A. Exploring the computational thinking effects in pre-university education. Computers in Human Behavior, 80, 407–411. (2018). doi:10.1016/j.chb.2017.12.005
  10. Mohaghegh, M., & McCauley, M. Computational thinking: The skill set of the 21st century. International Journal of Computer Science and Information Technologies, 7(3), 1524–1530. (2016).
  11. Pérez-Paredes, P., & Zapata-Ros, M. El pensamiento computacional, análisis de una competencia clave. Scotts Valley, CA, USA: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform. (2018).
  12. García-Peñalvo, F. J., Reimann, D., Tuul, M., Rees, A., & Jormanainen, I. An overview of the most relevant literature on coding and computational thinking with emphasis on the relevant issues for teachers. Belgium: TACCLE3. (2016). doi:10.5281/zenodo.165123
  13. DePryck, K. From computational thinking to coding and back. In F. J. García-Peñalvo (Ed.), Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Technological Ecosystems for Enhancing Multiculturality (TEEM’16) (Salamanca, Spain, November 2–4, 2016) (pp. 27–29). New York, NY, USA: ACM. (2016). doi:10.1145/3012430.3012492
  14. Curto, B., & Moreno, V. Robotics in education. Journal of Intelligent and Robotic Systems, 81(1), 3–4. (2016). doi:10.1007/s10846-015-0314-z
  15. Fernández-Llamas, C., Conde-González, M. Á., Rodríguez-Lera, F. J., Rodríguez-Sedano, F. J., & García-Peñalvo, F. J. May I teach you? Students’ behavior when lectured by robotic vs. human teachers. Computers in Human Behavior, 80, 460–469. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2017.09.028. (2018).
  16. Reimann, D., & Maday, C. Enseñanza y aprendizaje del modelado computacional en procesos creativos y contextos estéticos. Education in the Knowledge Society, 18(3), 87–97. (2017). doi:10.14201/eks20171838797
  17. García-Peñalvo, F. J., Reimann, D., & Maday, C. Introducing coding and computational thinking in the schools: The TACCLE 3 – coding project experience. In M. S. Khine (Ed.), Computational thinking in the STEM disciplines. Foundations and research highlights (pp. 213–226). Cham, Switzerland: Springer. (2018).doi:10.1007/978-3-319-93566-9_11
  18. García-Peñalvo, F. J. A brief introduction to TACCLE 3 – coding European project. In F. J. García-Peñalvo & J. A. Mendes (Eds.), 2016 International Symposium on Computers in Education (SIIE 16). USA: IEEE. (2016). doi:10.1109/SIIE.2016.7751876
  19. TACCLE 3 Consortium. TACCLE 3: Coding Erasmus + project website. (2017). Retrieved from https://goo.gl/f4QZUA
  20. Balanskat, A., & Engelhardt, K. Computing our future. Computer programming and coding priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe. Brussels, Belgium: European Schoolnet. (2015).
  21. Velázquez-Iturbide, J. Á. Report of the Spanish computing scientific society on computing education in pre-university stages. In F. J. García-Peñalvo (Ed.), Proceedings TEEM’18. Sixth International Conference on Technological Ecosystems for Enhancing Multiculturality (Salamanca, Spain, October 24–26, 2018) (pp. 2–7). New York, NY, USA: ACM. (2018). doi:10.1145/3284179.3284180
  22. Velázquez-Iturbide, J. Á., Bahamonde, A., Dabic, S., Escalona, M. J., Feito, F., Fernández Cabaleiro, S., . . . & Zapata Ros, M. Informe del grupo de trabajo SCIE/CODDII sobre la enseñanza preuniversitaria de la informática. España: Sociedad Científica Informática de España, Conferencia de Decanos y Directores de Ingeniería Informática. (2018).
  23. Yadav, A., Gretter, S., Good, J., & McLean, T. Computational thinking in teacher education. In P. J. Rich & C. B. Hodges (Eds.), Emerging research, practice, and policy on computational thinking (pp. 205–220). Cham, Switzerland: Springer. (2017). doi:10.1007/978-3-319-52691-1_13
  24. Villalba-Condori, K. O. Teaching formation to develop computational thinking. In F. J. García-Peñalvo (Ed.), Global implications of emerging technology trends (pp. 59–72). Hershey, PA, USA: IGI Global. (2018). doi:10.4018/978-1-5225-4944-4.ch004
  25. Villalba-Condori, K. O., Castro Cuba-Sayco, S. E., Guillen Chávez, E. P., Deco, C., & Bender, C. Approaches of learning and computational thinking in students that get into the computer sciences career. In F. J. García-Peñalvo (Ed.), Proceedings TEEM’18. Sixth International Conference on Technological Ecosystems for Enhancing Multiculturality (Salamanca, Spain, October 24–26, 2018) (pp. 36–40). New York, NY, USA: ACM. (2018). doi:10.1145/3284179.3284185
  26. Michavila, F., Martínez, J. M., Martín-González, M., García-Peñalvo, F. J., & Cruz-Benito, J. Barómetro de empleabilidad y empleo de los universitarios en España, 2015 (Primer informe de resultados). Madrid: Observatorio de Empleabilidad y Empleo Universitarios. (2016).
  27. Michavila, F., Martínez, J. M., Martín-González, M., García-Peñalvo, F. J., & Cruz Benito, J. Empleabilidad de los titulados universitarios en España. Proyecto OEEU. Education in the Knowledge Society, 19(1), 21–39. (2018a). doi:10.14201/eks20181912139
  28. Michavila, F., Martínez, J. M., Martín-González, M., García-Peñalvo, F. J., Cruz-Benito, J., & Vázquez-Ingelmo, A. Barómetro de empleabilidad y empleo universitarios. Edición Máster 2017. Madrid, España: Observatorio de Empleabilidad y Empleo Universitarios. (2018b).
  29. Beach, D., Bagley, C., Eriksson, A. & Player-Koro, C. Changing teacher education in Sweden: Using meta-ethnographic analysis to understand and describe policy making and educational changes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 44, 160–167. (2016).
  30. Burns, T., & Köster, F. (Eds.). Governing education in a complex world. Paris: OECD Publishing. (2016). doi:10.1787/9789264255364-en
  31. Berlanga, A. J., & García-Peñalvo, F. J. Learning design in adaptive educational hypermedia systems. Journal of Universal Computer Science, 14(22), 3627–3647. (2008). doi:10.3217/jucs-014-22-3627
  32. Zapata-Ros, M. La universidad inteligente. La transición de los LMS a los sistemas inteligentes de aprendizaje en educación superior. RED, Revista de Educación a distancia, 57(10). (2018). doi:10.6018/red/57/10
  33. Molina-Carmona, R., & Villagrá-Arnedo, C. J. Smart learning. In F. J. García-Peñalvo (Ed.), Proceedings TEEM’18. Sixth International Conference on Technological Ecosystems for Enhancing Multiculturality (Salamanca, Spain, October 24–26, 2018) (pp. 645–647). New York, NY, USA: ACM. (2018). doi:10.1145/3284179.3284288
  34. Lerís, D., & Sein-Echaluce, M. L. La personalización del aprendizaje: Un objetivo del paradigma educativo centrado en el aprendizaje. Arbor, 187 (Extra_3), 123–134. (2011). doi:10.3989/arbor.2011.Extra-3n3135
  35. Conde-González, M. Á., Colomo-Palacios, R., García-Peñalvo, F. J., & Larrueca, X. Teamwork assessment in the educational web of data: A learning analytics approach towards ISO 10018. Telematics and Informatics, 35(3), 551–563. (2018). doi:10.1016/j.tele.2017.02.001
  36. Fidalgo-Blanco, Á., Sein-Echaluce, M. L., & García-Peñalvo, F. J. Micro flip teaching with collective intelligence (2018). In P. Zaphiris & A. Ioannou (Eds.), Learning and collaboration technologies. Design, development and technological innovation. 5th International Conference, LCT 2018, held as part of HCI International 2018, Las Vegas, NV, USA, July 15–20, 2018, Proceedings, Part I (pp. 400–415). Cham, Switzerland: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-91743-6_30
  37. Llorens-Largo, F., Molina-Carmona, R., Compañ, P., & Satorre, R. Technological ecosystem for open education. In R. Neves-Silva, G. A. Tsihrintzis, V. Uskov, R. J. Howlett, & L. C. Jain (Eds.), Smart digital futures 2014. (pp. 706–715). Amsterdam, The Netherlands: IOS Press. (2014).
  38. García-Peñalvo, F. J. Ecosistemas tecnológicos universitarios. In J. Gómez (Ed.), UNIVERSITIC 2017. Análisis de las TIC en las Universidades Españolas (pp. 164–170). Madrid, España: Crue Universidades Españolas. (2018).
  39. García-Holgado, A., & García-Peñalvo, F. J. Validation of the learning ecosystem metamodel using transformation rules. Future Generation Computer Systems, 91, 300–310. (2019). doi:10.1016/j.future.2018.09.011
  40. Rubio Royo, E., Cranfield McKay, S., Nelson-Santana, J. C., Delgado Rodríguez, R. N., & Occon-Carreras, A. A. Web knowledge turbine as a proposal for personal and professional self-organisation in complex times. Journal of Information Technology Research, 11(1), 70–90. (2018). doi:10.4018/JITR.2018010105
  41. Ferguson, R. Learning analytics: Drivers, developments and challenges. International Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 4(5/6), 304–317. (2012). doi:10.1504/IJTEL.2012.051816
  42. Conde-González, M. Á., & Hernández-García, Á. Learning analytics for educational decision making. Computers in Human Behavior, 47, 1–3. (2015). doi:10.1016/j.chb.2014.12.03
  43. Griffiths, D., & García-Peñalvo, F. J. Informal learning recognition and management. Computers in Human Behavior, 55A, 501–503. (2016). doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.10.019

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159).
Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria.
Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York.
Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

Pensamiento computacional en los primeros ciclos educativos, un pensamiento computacional desenchufado (y II)

 

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Murcia

ISSN 2386-8562

DOI : 10.13140/RG.2.2.12945.48481

Este artículo está bajo una licencia de Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0

Debe ser citado como:

Zapata-Ros, M. (2018)Pensamiento computacional en los primeros ciclos educativos, un pensamiento computacional desenchufado (II). Blog RED de Hypotheses. El aprendizaje en la Sociedad del Conocimiento.  https://red.hypotheses.org/1662

En el post anterior veíamos que la idea de pensamiento computacional desenchufado (Computational thinking unplugged) hace referencia al conjunto de actividades, y a su diseño educativo, que se diseñan y utilizan para fomentar en los niños, en las primeras etapas de su desarrollo cognitivo (educación infantil, primer tramo de la educación primaria, juegos en casa con los padres y los amigos,…)  habilidades que luego pueden ser evocadas para potenciar un buen aprendizaje del pensamiento computacional en otras etapas, o en la formación técnica, profesional o en la universitaria incluso. Actividades que se suelen hacer con fichas, cartulinas, juegos de salón o de patio, juguetes mecánicos, etc.

Continuamos en esta entrada desarrollando el tema con ideas acerca de cómo pueden ser las actividades, con qué recursos podemos contar, y con la propuesta  de un modelo concreto, adjuntando un prototipo de diseño de actividades. También hablaremos de qué bases reales contamos para ello.

Actividades

El diseño instruccional del pensamiento computacional desenchufado, como en cualquier otro caso, deberá procurar enlazar intenciones, condiciones y recursos con objetivos, con  resultados deseados de aprendizaje. En este caso con el desarrollo de las habilidades que constituyen los elementos del pensamiento computacional tal como lo hemos definido en El pensamiento computacional, análisis de una competencia clave (Pérez-Paredes & Zapata-Ros, 2018) y en Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital (Zapata-Ros, 2015).  En este esquema, el del diseño instruccional ocupan un lugar clave las actividades. Sin actividades no hay aprendizajes, y es haciendo como se aprende. Pero ¿qué actividades? Las que sin duda propicien el mayor acercamiento y el mayor y más eficiente adquisición de habilidades y constructos cognitivos de  las componentes del pensamiento computacional. Pero además el pensamiento computacional de este tipo supone crear espacios, organizar recursos y dotarse de metodologías adecuadas. Consistemente con lo dicho en otros sitios, y sin anímo de ser exclusivos, dos van a ser las componentes metodológicas dominantes: la perspectiva Montessori de los rincones de trabajo para estas etapas y el dominio del aprendizaje (mastery learning).

En este libro (Pérez-Paredes & Zapata-Ros, 2018, pág. 63), en este artículo (Zapata-Ros, 2015) y en estos posts decíamos que el pensamiento computacional estaba constituido por los elementos siguientes, los definíamos y los describimos. Pues bien las actividades deben desarrollar estos elementos, y habrá que definirlas y diseñarlas con elementos curriculares adecuados (guías para maestros y profesores) y materiales para alumnos.

Los elementos recordemos que eran:

El trabajo que hay por delante es diseñar actividades adecuadas para cada uno o para cada racimo de ellos. Y hay que relacionarlas adecuadamente con las habilidades que desarrollan. También hay que decir cómo se verifican y en qué grado se consigue el domino (evaluación).

El corolario es que hay que encontrar y explorar juegos y actividades con más potencial cognitivo para el desarrollo de esas habilidades. Y que hay que hacer un diseño educativo de esos juegos y de esas actividades.

Veamos un ejemplo:

Pre-álgebra para niños

Vamos a intentar introducir un juego o una actividad para desarrollo de pensamiento abstracto, preálgebra, en niños de entre 4 y 6 años. Conviene aclarar que el intervalo de edad lo hacemos de forma estimativa, porque igual podría el intervalo tomarse en función de otras características madurativas que se puedan tener en cuenta de manera convenientemente documentada y adaptada.

Youkara Youkara 1 PC es un juego infantil fabricado en China, cerca de Cantón, por la empresa Youkara, que se vende a través Amazon por el precio de 0,89€.

Es útil en principio, o está pensado, para que, con ayuda del maestro o de los padres, los niños desde los dos años se ejerciten en identificar los símbolos de los números o guarismos con la cantidad, o con el resultado de contar, abstrayendo esta cualidad de otras como es el color. Y para adquirir la práctica de las operaciones elementales a través de la práctica de contar.

Pero también podemos utilizar un juego tan versátil como éste de otra forma, en el sentido señalado en el preámbulo de este post. Pensemos, para ello, en esta actividad:

Presentar y pedir al niño que realice de forma consecutiva operaciones de multiplicar, con barras y con números indistintamente, hasta que alcance un completo dominio:

En ese punto podemos empezar a proponer prácticas mezclando barritas con números, donde al cabo de un rato si bien puede identificar la cantidad con el dígito, también puede identificar la cantidad o el dígito con un ente sustitutivo:

En este caso el elemento sustitutivo serán las barritas, y además en el mismo  número. En fases alternativas podemos sustituir por una sola barrita o por un objeto,… y ver qué pasa:

Pidiendo al niño que diga a qué equivale o a qué ha sustituido el botón.

Incluso poniendo botones en otras posiciones, como por ejemplo:

Repitiendo la operación hasta el dominio o hasta que el niño empiece a dar muestras de cansancio, pero rápidamente haciéndole ver el gran éxito que supone su logro.

Podemos incluso utilizar el mismo botón para otros casos y ver en ellos a qué número o cantidad sustituye:

Y por último utilizar en vez de un botón otro objeto.

Si finalmente conseguimos que adquiera el dominio en casos así habremos conseguido que adquiera un concepto muy próximo al de incógnita, ecuación y variable.

La cuestión ahora estriba en formar a maestros y dotarles de guías adecuadas, en destrezas docentes para que desarrollen en los niños un pensamiento preabstracto, que pueda ser evocado posteriormente.

Esta actividad enlaza pues con el elemento,  de pensamiento computacional, que hemos considerado como pensamiento abstracto.

 

Materiales

Muchos hemos estado en Ikea y hemos visto juguetes basados en metodologías de aprendizaje por manipulación, los popularmente conocidos como juguetes Montessori. Tienen este nombre por ser esta autora la que más impulsó y desarrolló este tipo de aprendizaje, el que se produce por la manipulación autónoma por el alumno en un entorno, al que en este caso se denomina rincón, organizado para este fin. Son juguetes para que los niños, a través de la exploración y del desarrollo de sus actividades motoras y sensoriales también desarrollen otras habilidades y facultades cognitivas que en otro momento pueden facilitar aprendizajes de este tipo más complejos. Nos referimos, solo a modo de ejemplo, sin ser exhaustivos, a algunos de estos aprendizajes:

A sus habilidades de secuenciación: Por forma, tamaño, color,… con la consiguiente creación de ideas sobre conceptos como variable, o en sentido más amplio, de rasgos multivariantes de los objetos y de otros entes más o menos abstractos.

A sus habilidades de encaje, con discriminación de objetos por formas y tamaños, y del concepto más abstracto de encaje, qué tipos de cosas encajan con qué tipo de cosas. Pensemos en un futuro en variables y tipos de datos. En una variable booleana solo encajan datos booleanos, en una variable string solo encajan datos string,…

A su pensamiento lógico y a su capacidad de resolución de problemas. Puede parecer  exagerado o traído por los pelos. Pero pensemos que con la percepción sensorial  y las facultades cenestésicas se adquieren habilidades y conocimientos, se practica el ensayo-error: Como por ejemplo resolver problemas complejos como el de las Torres de Hanoi.

Que incluso en sus versiones más sencillas sirven para que  alumnos de Educación Infantil puedan secuenciar por formas y colores

También, si en la página de Amazon, en la búsqueda, escribimos las palabras juguetes y Montessori, aparecen multitud de juguetes que podemos utilizar para todas las actividades que vamos describiendo en estos posts.

También, más allá de los diseños educativos y de las guías, en las iniciativas que hemos estudiado (Pérez-Paredes & Zapata-Ros, 2018) (Zapata-Ros, 2018) podemos encontrar más juegos y actividades. Todas ellas tienen en común un mismo rasgo: Con muy poco artificio consiguen un conocimiento, un incremento cognitivo muy fuerte, muy considerable. Vamos a ver algunos ejemplos, pero en los lugares de CS Unplugged y de Play Maker se pueden encontrar muchos más que pueden servir de base o de referencia para diseñar adaptándolo de nuevo o recreándolo adaptado a nuestros entornos y a nuestras condiciones educativas con gran facilidad.

De tipo CS Unpluged (Informática desenchufada)

En https://www.csunplugged.org/en/topics/ podemos encontrar 23 lecciones (actividades completas para desarrollar un tópico) para niños básicamente entre 5 y 10 años, propuestas por Cs Unplugged (https://www.csunplugged.org/es/)

De ellas una ACTIVIDAD MUY IMPORTANTE, aunque las demás también lo sean, es la que dedican a escritura, lectura e interpretación de números binarios. Ese es un tema que, con ser tan importante, se desconoce en la era digital, no solo por alumnos de cualquier nivel, sino por maestros. Lamentablemente hay que reconocerlo: con el nivel que se propone y que se puede conseguir fácilmente para niños de 5 a 10 años, en nuestro país es difícil encontrar a maestros que lo dispongan. Me da la impresión que iniciar un programa de formación de maestros para que desarrollen estas actividades en niños encontraría un primer e insalvable obstáculo: Los destinatarios nos exigirían de entrada otro programa para formarse en numeración binaria.   Me gustaría equivocarme y que alguien me lo demostrara.

En este sitio nos lo dan todo y nos lo explican con un coste cero, o casi, https://www.csunplugged.org/en/topics/binary-numbers/unit-plan/how-binary-digits-work-junior/

El material son cartulinas, que la página del programa nos da como imprimibles. También nos suministra un vídeo decómo se desarrolla una clase. Y donde es fácil ver cuál es el nivel de dominio.

No es este el lugar para explicar con más profundidad las actividades, guías, etc. Sólo remito a que próximamente desarrollaremos nuestro propio material en español, y nuestras propias guías.

Hay otros temas, otras lecciones, por ver y tratar. Tanto las que ellos han previsto: Numeración binaria, kitbots y formas geométricas, redes de clasificación, detección y corrección de errores, y algoritmos de búsqueda. Así como otras que se pueden en un futuro elaborar: Álgebra, tipos de datos y variables, diagramas de flujo, operadores lógicos,…

Actividades con juguetes animados PlayMaker

Desde septiembre de 2015 la iniciativa Playmaker ha estado experimentando con las abejas bee bot en un preescolar experimental dirigido por Temasek Polytechnic. Esto fue tras un proceso de selección (curación) internacional. Toda la información está en este enlace y en éste.

Imagen de IMDA

Con diversas modalidades, desde entonces hasta ahora, se han desarrollado múltiples opciones de dispositivo que sin pantallas de ningún tipo permiten hacer con juguetes reales lo que hacía LOGO con las órdenes elementales de la tortuga, y programarle para que camine o salga de un laberinto. Ésta es la idea y la tarea básica. El último ha sido SPRK Sphero del Lightning Lab app, en su versión para Apple que ha comercializado con el nombre de SPRK Sphero, y en el que está invirtiendo mucho, pero siempre desde el punto de vista  de vincularlo a sus otros productos de Apple y a la venta de estos, más que a lo que hemos propuesto como pensamiento computacional, desenchufado o no y a la nueva alfabetización digital. De hecho lo de no utilizar pantallas para niños es algo nominal puramente para ellos, de forma casi inmediata utilizan iPad, iPhone y Mac para programar y controlar el artilugio. Un trabajo al respecto sobre sus posibilidades lo hacen Ioannou y Bratitsis (2017, July) en Teaching the notion of Speed in Kindergarten using the Sphero SPRK robot. Sin embargo los resultados son pobres, sólo aprendizajes conceptuales sobre términos y acciones que serían igualmente posibles, e incluso más eficaces, de adquirir con un diseño mucho más simple y sin tanto aparataje tecnológico que puede complicarlo y hacerlo distractivo.

Un repertorio actual de actividades pueden encontrarlo en Sphero.edu, y de sus programas para el artilugio en https://edu.sphero.com/

Pero volvamos a los juguetes de Play Maker. Del proceso gubernamental, diez juguetes fueron preseleccionados después de un proceso de investigación internacional, después fueron elegidos cuatro candidatos exitosos por un equipo de funcionarios expertos. Finalmente se implementaron Bee Bot y Kibo.

Ninguno de estos juguetes requiere una pantalla. Se trataba de que los niños no sobrepasasen ni se les indujese a pasar más de 2 horas al día usando una pantalla, incluido el uso en el hogar. Y por otra parte se deseaba fomentar la interacción social y desarrollar habilidades de comunicación. 

En 2015 los juguetes fueron validados (Chambers, 2015) en el preescolar Yuhua PCF en el distrito de Jurong Lake. Fue elegido, porque es una escuela con tarifas bajas en lugar de una de las escuelas preescolares más caras de Singapur. El año 2016, se dotó un plan de $1.5 millones para estos juguetes y su uso escolar en otros 160 centros preescolares en toda el país (Chambers, 2015).

Los procesos de validación, continuando con lo que dice la página oficial (Chambers, 2015 y Infocomm Media Development Authority, November 2017)   han asegurado que los maestros pueden incorporar los juguetes en los planes curriculares oficiales, y reunieron una serie de actividades una mezcla de robots complejos y herramientas simples, procurando desarrollar una variedad de habilidades de pensamiento computacional desenchufado en los alumnos.

Todo esto está descrito en las news gubernamentales , en New tech toys debut at pilot preschools as part of IDA’s PlayMaker Programme.

Sin embargo no hemos encontrado registros de la investigación que validó los resultados, sólo el trabajo de Sullivan & Bers (2017) Dancing robots: integrating art, music, and robotics in Singapore’s early childhood centers.

En este sentido hay que decir que, en Singapur, según la ordenación educativa los niños de 3 a 6 años de edad asisten a centros preescolares, en su mayoría de gestión privada. Como en otros países existe una agencia pública autónoma, la Autoridad de Desarrollo de Medios de Infocomm ( The Infocomm Media Development Authority (IMDA)), que fue la que lanzó la iniciativa Playmaker con el objetivo de introducir el Pensamiento Computacional en las Escuelas Infantiles y Preescolares en Singapur (IMDA, 2017). Hay más de 3000 centros preescolares en Singapur, la fase experimental fue en 160 de esos centros. La idea del IMDA para la introducción del pensamiento computacional  era seleccionar juguetes sin pantalla, sin el uso auxiliar o central de tablets, ordenadores o smartphones, que involucrasen a los niños más pequeños en el juego y desarrollasen habilidades del pensamiento computacional,  como son el pensamiento algorítmico.

El papel del IMDA fue proporcionar un kit de juguetes a los centros piloto para que los maestros los usen en el aula.

El paquete estaba compuesto por: 1) Beebot; 2) Kibo y 3) Pegatinas de circuito (peel-and-stick electronics for crafting circuits).

 

Actividades con Beebot en el programa PlayMaker

Beebot (Abeja robot) es un juguete que puede dar pasos sencillos, elementales, como lo hacía la tortuga de LOGO, pero sin tener que utilizar ordenador, pantalla y órdenes de programación. Pasos sencillos que son programables manualmente para controlar el movimiento, y para hacer secuencias de movimiento más complejas. De esta forma los niños pueden programar el juguete para que se place según un camino deseado, mediante la secuencia lógica de pasos, en su número y dirección adecuados, para llegar al destino.

Jugar a Beebot puede ayudar a los niños pequeños a desarrollar habilidades de resolución de problemas y pensamiento lógico al planificar y programar el movimiento del juguete.

En el documento de Jack Graham(2018), reproducido y adaptado después por Infocomm Media Development Authority de Singapur (2018 October) en The game is on for PlayMaker, se dan ideas y conceptos generales de las actividades que se proponen y se han llevado a cabo de forma experimental en PlayMaker. Como hemos dicho antes, la única referencia sobre la validación que da es, la única que hasta ahora hemos encontrado por otra parte es el trabajo de Sullivan & Bers (2017). Dancing robots: integrating art, music, and robotics in Singapore’s early childhood centers en la revista International Journal of Technology and Design Education . Por tanto saltándome la línea argumental de este post quiero aprovechar la ocasión para remarcar la necesidad de investigaciones que validen estas estrategias educativas utilizando este tipo de recursos, y la tendencia de pensamiento computacional desenchufado.

El trabajo de Graham (2018) es muy importante no solo porque hable de actividades y de Beebot, también habla de Kibo y de Play Maker en general, sino porque da referencias sobre el proyecto muy importantes, señala cuales son las ideas generales, cuales son los efectos que supuestamente debe producir (outcomes) todo ello supone un cambio de paradigma, sostiene, y resuelve temas claves como son la animación a las chicas: «¿Por qué no empezar a involucrar a las niñas temprano, antes de que los estereotipos de género estén profundamente arraigados?».  Y sobre todo porque pone la evidencia de todo, en esta experiencia que después se generaliza, en el trabajo de Sullivan & Bers (2017):

La evidencia muestra que los niños en el piloto dominaron los conceptos de programación muy rápidamente. Al completar tareas que crean órdenes de instrucciones para los robots, los niños aprenden a hacer secuencias. Esta es una importante habilidad pre-matemática y de pre-alfabetización, dijo Amanda Sullivan, investigadora del equipo DevTech de la Universidad de Tufts, que creó el robot Kibo.

De todas formas el más completo e interesante trabajo sobre propuestas de actividades con BeeBot lo hemos encontrado en la presentación Power Point  de Gallagher, Thissen y Hrdina (2018) Little Coders Computational Thinking in K-2 Classrooms al congreso NCCE 2019. En ella dan una relación muy extensa, pero sólo nominal, de actividades en relación con los objetivos de aprendizaje de pensamiento computacional, prematemáticos y pre-STEM esperados.

Actividades con Kibo en el programa PlayMaker

Kibo fue desarrollado por investigadores en la Universidad de Tufts. Con él los niños pueden crear una secuencia de instrucciones al organizar bloques de madera Kibo. Los bloques se pueden incluir en la secuencia con las instrucciones, que se pasan al robot a través de un escaneo de códigos que llevan los bloques, y éste ejecuta sucesivamente los pasos.

Playmaker Project from Nurul Ameera on Vimeo.

Nurul A. (2016). Playmaker Project. The children were introduced to the robots named Bee-Bot and Kibo for this Playmaker Project. Recuperado de https://vimeo.com/179032348

Todo lo dicho anteriormente y lo tratado por Jack Graham(2018), reproducido y adaptado después por Infocomm Media Development Authority de Singapur (2018 October) en The game is on for PlayMaker, y  la validación que dan, la única que hasta ahora hemos encontrado , en su trabajo Sullivan & Bers (2017). Dancing robots: integrating art, music, and robotics in Singapore’s early childhood centers en la revista International Journal of Technology and Design Education son válidos para KIBO.

El trabajo de Graham (2018) es muy importante porque da referencias sobre el proyecto (también sobre KIBO) muy importantes. Y sobre todo porque nos indica donde se evidencian los resultados de esta experiencia que después se generaliza. Nos referencia en este sentido el trabajo de Sullivan & Bers (2017).

Para empezar a hablar de las actividades con KIBO citaremos las guías que la propia empresa fabricante pone en circulación y regala con el kit de KIBO.

KinderLab ha lanzado una guía curricular para actividades de robótica autodirigida. Realmente va orientada a los aspectos más llamativos, pero no a los más eficaces, en el paso de la Universidad de Tufts ha perdido bastante de la potencia original. KinderLab Robotics es el fabricante del kit de robótica KIBO. Ésta, llamada guía curricular,  proporciona planes de lecciones autoinstructivas para las actividades de los estudiantes, que pueden realizarse bien en un equipo de diseñadores curriculares e en un centro, como actividades escolares.

Las dotaciones KIBO están diseñados para niños de 4 a 7 años de edad, y proporcionan las componentes necesarias para «construir, programar, decidir el aspecto y dar vida a su propio robot» sin la necesidad de ordenador o dispositivo móvil. Hay cuatro tipos distintos de dotaciones disponibles; dos están disponibles en equipaciones para aulas de hasta 24 alumnos e incluyen guías y materiales para maestros.

La nueva guía curricular incluye tres programas de actividades distintas Cada una se centra en un aspecto diferente de la educación STEAM. :

  • KIBO Bowling; se usa para las matemáticas
  • KIBO Dance Party; incluye arte, codificación y música. 
  • Diseño de formas con KIBO. Sirve para el dibujo y la geometría.

A las actividades se puede acceder desde la web oficial de Kinder Lab Robotics, impulsada por el grupo de la Universidad de Tufts (DEVTECH Research Group) en http://kinderlabrobotics.com/ , y de las páginas específicas que de ahí sales. Por ejemplo para niños de 4 a 7 años: http://kinderlabrobotics.com/kibo/

Como en el caso de Bee Bot , más información se puede obtener de la web Apolitical https://apolitical.co/solution_article/meet-the-robots-teaching-singapores-kids-tech/ , que reproduce el trabajo de Graham (2018 July): Meet the robots teaching Singapore’s kids tech. The interactive toys reduce time children spend in front of screens

Actividades desarrolladas en DevTech Research Group, Tufts University:

KIBO es el resultado aparentemente sencillo de décadas de investigaciones complejas sobre aprendizaje cinestésico, construccionismo y otras investigaciones precedentes sobre este tipo de parendizajes, lideradas por la Dra. Marina Umaschi Bers, profesora en el Departamento de Desarrollo Infantil y Desarrollo Humano de Eliot-Pearson y director del Grupo de Investigación DevTech en la Universidad de Tufts. En las páginas del grupo están los trabajos sobre las investigaciones que respaldan Kibo, y las evidencias de que KIBO establece una gran diferencia entre el aprendizaje convencional y ciertos aprendizajes ayudados por este recurso, y además los niños lo hacen con gran motivación por su componente lúdico.

El acceso a estas actividades (mediante compra) está aquí.

Para instituciones educativas

Los KIBO 18 y KIBO 21 están disponibles en varios Paquetes de Aula, que incluyen materiales de currículo (guías).

Además, se pueden comprar a la carta kits de robots individuales, bloques de programaciónmódulosplanes de estudio adicionales y materiales para maestros.

Para individuos

Además KIBO está disponible en 4 configuraciones de robots diferentes. Otros artículos disponibles incluyen bloques y módulos de programación a la carta, currículo y materiales para maestros

Un ejemplo de estas actividades es la que sigue (DevTech Research Group, 2016). Adjuntamos pues el enlace a la guía para Literacy Activities with KIBO’s Expression Module, en la que se describen siete actividades para este tema. Este documento está disponible de forma gratuita en el sitio web de la Tufts University’s Early Childhood Robotics Network.

Este folleto contiene actividades pensadas para que los niños practiquen la lectura y la escritura utilizando el Módulo de Expresión de KIBO. Las actividades se pueden realizar individualmente o se pueden integrar con un módulo de robótica. Puede elegir las actividades que más se adapten a cada profesor y a sus alumnos. No obstante, si bien están diseñadas para niños de Educación Infantil, pueden adaptarse fácilmente para alumnos de primer ciclo de Primaria, hasta 8 años.

Otro ejemplo de actividad con KIBO es “Dónde viven los monstruos, guías para profesores, un curriculum completo” (Where the Wild Things Are). Como documento en PDF aquí

Esta unidad está Inspirada en el libro  Where the Wild Things Are, los contenidos son sobre alfabetización digital y robótica. Es mediante trabajo en  proyecto. Los estudiantes trabajan solos o en grupos (Metodología Montessori) para recrear el “wild rumpus” del libro original, programando sus robots KIBO para representar esta escena del libro.

Otras guías y recursos se pueden encontrar en el sitio de Tufts University’s Early Childhood Robotics Network.

La página con los recursos y todo lo demás de Tufts University’s Early Childhood Robotics Network está en http://sites.tufts.edu/devtech/  y en The Developmental Technologies Research Group, dirigida por la Profesora Marina Umaschi Bers en el Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study and Human DevelopmentTufts University ( Grupo de Investigación sobre Tecnologías del Desarrollo, dirigido por la  Prof. Marina Umaschi Bers  en el  Departamento de Estudio del Niño y Desarrollo Humano de Eliot-Pearson , en  la Universidad de Tufts)  http://ase.tufts.edu/epcshd/ 

El repertorio completo de Kinder Lab Robotics está en  http://resources.kinderlabrobotics.com/category/curriculum/

Amazon

Algunos de estas affordances de pensamiento computacional desenchufado y sin pantallas  también las podemos encontrar en Amazon o en otros sitios:

La primera de ella es el kit de Ratón,  similar a bee‑bot, en Amazon Learning Resources Code & Go Robot Mouse Activity Set

Hasta bien reciente ha estado igualmente disponible en Amazon la abeja programable Beet Bot.

Etiquetas adhesivas y circuitos (peel-and-stick electronics for crafting circuits).-

Se trata de un conjunto de herramientas que consta de componentes electrónicos para quitar el plástico y pegar, tales como LED y cintas de cobre como conductor. Con este kit de herramientas, los niños pequeños pueden crear proyectos interactivos de arte, o como artesanía, incrustados con adhesivos LED y sensores que responden al entorno o estímulos externos (ver la figura). Los niños pueden desarrollar su creatividad en actividades prácticas mientras aprenden y aplican conceptos básicos de electricidad, como son circuitos e interruptores. E incluso aprender circuitos lógicos. En el apartado de propuestas de actividades de este trabajo incluimos como ejemplo de actividad con este recurso la construcción de circuitos lógicos (puertas lógicas). 

Bases para la propuesta de actividades.-

Con todo lo dicho en este trabajo cabría hacer una o varias propuestas de guías de actividades que sirviese de modelo. Incluso, en un estado más avanzado, cabría hacer una propuesta de lección (módulo, unidad didáctica,…) que incluyese, organizadas en un diseño instruccional completo, todas las actividades para esa unidad que contuviesen elementos de pensamiento computacional de este tipo, para educación infantil o de primer tramo de primaria.

No hace falta, para hacer la propuesta, que hagamos referencia y describamos todos los elementos de pedagogía específica o los principios de aprendizaje que utilizamos. Todo ello subyace y está presente en la propuesta.

Podemos tomar como ejemplos algunos que ya están consolidados y son de uso avalado por la edición y la práctica en entornos reales.

Material Montessori para actividades en las etapas de Ciclo Inicial primaria y Educación Infantil

Creo que no seríamos excesivamente osados si dijéramos que la aritmética es la ciencia de la computación utilizando números racionales positivos. Si hacemos una restricción utilizando la expresión aritmética como frecuentemente se hace, es decir como una parte de las competencias claves (las otras serían el álgebra elemental, la geometría la lectura, la escritura y la cinestesia), o sea específicamente los  procesos de sumar, restar, multiplicar y dividir, estaríamos dentro de un conjunto de habilidades para las que es idónea la metodología Montessori. Con el añadido de que los materiales del aula infantil y primaria pensada por Montessori también presentan experiencias sensoriales para geometría y álgebra.

Los escritos, basados en experiencias e investigaciones, de Montessori hacen énfasis en que  los niños pequeños se sienten atraídos de forma natural por la peculiaridad y las propiedades del número. Este instinto es el que hace que las matemáticas, como lenguaje, sean el producto exclusivo del intelecto humano. Es parte de la naturaleza de las personas. Las matemáticas surgen de la mente humana cuando entra en contacto con el mundo y contempla en el universo, en el mundo que le rodea, los factores de cantidad, cardinalidad, tiempo y el espacio.

Destacan la evidencia del esfuerzo del humano por comprender el mundo en el que vive, y el uso de los números para ello. Todos los humanos exhiben esta propensión matemática, incluso los niños pequeños. Por lo tanto, se puede decir que la humanidad tiene una mente matemática.

Hay pues un precedente a lo que consideramos el pensamiento computacional en las primeras etapas del desarrollo cognitivo, es lo que María Montessori llama mente matemática.

Esta percepción la tuvieron Maria Montessori, y sus muchos colegas y colaboradores , al observar muchas evidencias espontáneas y no programadas en el contexto del desarrollo de los niños. Estos hechos se pudieron generalizar constituyendo principios que fueron la base de su metodología, al ser invariantes al lugar y al momento donde se producían. Estos principios constituyeron el ambiente preparado de su primera experiencia diseñada en la Casa dei Bambini.

Así pues el trabajo de Montessori se centra en estas características universales del ser humano y de los niños. Para ilustrar este conjunto de características de la mente humana, Montessori rescata el término «mente matemática» de Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), quien dice que la esencia íntima del pensamiento humano (la mente humana) es de «de naturaleza matemática». En La Mente Absorbente (The absorbent mind)  Montessori (1959) escribe:

En nuestro trabajo, le hemos dado un nombre a esta parte de la mente que se construye con exactitud … la llamamos «la mente matemática». Tomo el término de Pascal … quien dijo que la mente del hombre era matemática por naturaleza y que el conocimiento y el progreso proviene de la observación precisa.

Así pues Montessori tomó el término del matemático, filósofo y teólogo francés del siglo XVII, Blaise Pascal (1623-1662). Otra coincidencia notable: los intereses de Pascal eran a la vez profundos que amplios, ¿o quizá es que la mente matemática era un ente más amplio, como ahora vemos al hablar de STEM y de pensamiento computacional, y los integraba. Pascal  inventó un artificio que hoy se considera un antecesor, el primero de los ordenadores, pero mecánico: la Pascalina; también produjo puntos de singularidad en la geometría, la teoría de probabilidades y la defensa del método científico como prueba de los asertos científicos (una idea nueva en su época); En esa época, en 1653, ya escribió lo siguiente en un ensayo titulado Discours sur les Passions de l’Amour:

There are two types of mind … the mathematical, and what might be called the intuitive. The former arrives at its views slowly, but they are firm and rigid; the latter is endowed with greater flexibility and applies itself simultaneously to the diverse lovable parts of that which it loves.

En su trabajo La Mente Absorbente (The Absorbent Mind), en la versión versión de 1949,  encontramos que Montessori (1949, a través de Sackett, 2014).) utiliza el término “la mente matemática”en el capítulo “Further Elaboration through Culture”. Lo utiliza para describir una característica universal del ser humano, específicamente, que la mente «se desarrolla y funciona … con exactitud», a partir en este caso también a partir de las ideas de Pascal:

En nuestro trabajo, le hemos dado un nombre a esta parte de la mente que se construye con exactitud … la llamamos «la mente matemática». Tomo el término de Pascal … quien dijo que la mente del hombre era matemática por naturaleza y que el conocimiento y el progreso proviene de la observación precisa.

Hay otros autores, además de Pascal y Montessori, que destacan esta característica humana universal. Traemos una que ofrece más detalles sobre este funcionamiento exacto a través de la observación, es en la creación de patrones, se debe al  matemático, y especialista en Matemáticas de la cadena de radio NPR[1], Keith Devlin (2001):

La mente humana es un reconocedor de patrones … La capacidad de ver patrones y similitudes es una de las mayores fortalezas de la mente humana … patrones visuales, patrones auditivos, patrones lingüísticos, patrones de actividades, patrones de comportamiento, patrones lógicos y muchos otros. Esos patrones pueden estar presentes en el mundo, o pueden ser impuestos por la mente humana como parte integral de su visión del mundo.

Pasamos pues a varios ejemplos de guías de actividades que hemos encontrado a partir de propuestas Montessori y que pueden servir de modelo.

Primer ejemplo.- Montessori à la maison de Delphine Gilles Cotte

Un ejemplo de diseño de actividades de este tipo nos lo da el libro Montessori à la maison, para padres, de Delphine Gilles Cotte,  que en España se publica como Montessori en casa (Tu hijo y tú) y en él la actividad “la torre rosa”

El guion es sencillo y la presentación sugestiva. No se necesita más.

Título: La torre rosa

Breve descripción y justificación: “El niño trabaja la lógica e inicia su capacidad de juicio…”

Elementos materiales que se necesitan. Descripción: “Necesitarás: 10 cubos de madera rosa…”

Enunciado de las actividades: “Ejercicio 1.- Pídele al niño que vaya a buscar los diez cubos de la torre…”

Descripción más extensa y comentada de las actividades: “En tiendas puedes encontrar torres…”

Segundo ejemplo.- Actividades Montessori de Matemáticas.

Living Montessori Now. Maths Activities Primary Guide es un repositorio de actividades y recursos para matemáticas que nos parece muy interesante como modelo de repositorio de recursos y actividades para pensamiento computacional desenchufado.

La web Living Montessori Now de Deb Chitwood[2]  dedica una página a Matemáticas. En ella podemos ver una numerosa y variada colección de actividades.

De ellas elegimos, sólo a título de ejemplo significativo, la denominada Small Bead Frame: introduction to addition, substraction and multiplication (Ábaco: Introducción a la suma, la resta y la multiplicación) en el apartado Passage to Abstraction (Transición a la abstracción).

Se trata de un ejemplo que se propone recurrentemente como actividad, conocida por todos, por eso la elegimos. Pero también en ese mismo apartado y en el resto hay numerosos y muy interesantes casos y ejemplos de actividades todos con un esquema y una estructura similar. También señalamos que, aunque utiliza una expresión en inglés muy elaboradaSmall Bead Frame que es la expresión estándar utilizada en los medios Montessori (Lillard, 2011),   se está refiriendo al ábaco decimal, diez cuentas por barra. El que podemos encontrar en Ikea o en Amazon, como tantos otros juegos que en este trabajo citamos.

Pues bien la estructura de estas guías didácticas es la siguiente, tomando como referencia Small Bead Frame: introduction to addition, substraction and multiplication:

Título:

Materiales (Elementos materiales que se necesitan. Descripción): En este caso el ábaco (Small Bead Frame), las pegatinas con las unidades, decenas, etc y materiales de anotación, papel y lápiz.

Notas.- Este apartado hace referencia a notas metodologías. Observaciones que se hacen al maestro sobre su trabajo con los alumnos.

Actividades.- Descripción de los ejercicios o actividades, en este caso agrupadas en racimos de actividades (a las que llama “presentaciones”). La primera incluye introducción, contando sin cero, contando con cero,…; la segunda incluye adición estática, adición, …; y así sucesivamente.

Más notas metodológicas.- Parece ser que estas son con carácter más generales que las anteriores, en este caso da una nota que vagamente recuerda un criterio de dominio (mastery learning):

Dr. Montessori referred to this piece of material as marking the passage to abstraction.

This material allows the child to stop using the material when he no longer needs it to find the answer to the problem.

Objetivos.- Escritos de forma directa y sencilla, como propósitos. En este caso para mostrar la relación entre las categorías posicionales del sistema decimal y para aclarar el sentido de posición y valor de posición, como requisitos necesarios y de ayuda para sumar y restar.

Control de error.- Se refiere a evaluación formativa, en este caso la propia habilidad del niño y las inscripciones en las anotaciones del niño.

Este apartado es importante y junto con los elementos o criterios de mastery learning los incluiremos en nuestra propuesta.

Edad.- Periodo madurativo para el que de forma estándar está recomendado. En este caso desde 5 años y medio a 6 años

Preguntas y comentarios.-  Apartado dedicado a los maestro para que compartan y discutan. En este caso se da la indicación de que compartan sus tus experiencias en un foro.

Otros materiales Montessori que pueden ayudar a elaborar las guías de actividades

Un ejemplo de proyecto con una colección  de libros que se dedica en su totalidad a la metodología Montessori y con un repertorio muy extenso de actividades es Libros Pedagógicos Montessori Paso a Paso de Escuela Viva. Son libros que agrupan las presentaciones de  materiales importantes desde los 2 a los 6 años.  Incluye traducidos al español varios libros escritos por María Montessori, y varios libros en los que se habla sobre la filosofía del método y en los que puedes profundizar. Lleva una buena presentación, secuenciada, ordenada, y con gráficos de calidad.

En particular recomendamos como útil por su estructura y formato utiizable para actividades de pensamiento computacional desenchufado:

Montessori Paso a Paso. El cálculo y las matemáticas. 3-6 años

Se puede adquirir en Amazon 

Va dedicado al aprendizaje de las matemáticas con el método Montessori . Tiene agrupadas y secuenciadas numerosas actividades y presentaciones para edades entre los 3 a los 6 años.

Podéis ver el índice detallado con todas las presentaciones aquí. Y el índice por aprendizajes en la foto de abajo.

Un ejemplo de actividad es la de La división.  Y de material es el del Gabinete geométrico 

Where the Wild Things Are.

Una exclente guía para el diseño de material curricular y el diseño de actividades lo constituye el Material de para KIBO titulado Where the Wild Things Are.  A KIBO Curriculum Unit on Programming and Robots Integrated with Foundational Literacy Topics de DevTech Research Group (2018), de Tufts University.

Un ejemplo para nuestra propuesta sería la actividad siguiente, incluida en el trabajo:

Activity 3: Vowel Maker

Goal: Students will program their robot to travel around and create new words.

Materials: 1 KIBO set per group of students, one Expression Module per KIBO, index cards, pen/marker

KIBO Concept: Sequencing with KIBOs programming blocks

Activity Preparation: Review KIBO’s different blocks. Identify three letter words that students are familiar with and have a vowel as one of the letters (ex. cat, bat, jet, bus, dog, top, hen, bib, lip). Choose a handful of words (at least as many words as there are robots) and write one word on each index card; however, do not write the vowel. Instead, draw a line to indicate that the vowel belongs in that area.

Activity Description: Students will choose one vowel (either of their choosing or one that is assigned) to write on their Expression Module. Then, they will program their robot to travel from a designated spot to one of the index cards. In order to go to an index card, the vowel on the Expression Module needs to be the vowel that completes the index card to create a real word. For example, if a group has “e” written on their index card, their KIBO could travel to “h_n” and “j_t” but not “c_t.” If desired, this activity can be repeated, either by having the groups change their vowel or have the robots travel to another index card.

Activity Extension: Try lengthening the words or choosing words that have the same vowel in two different places in a word.

Actividad 3: Hacedor de vocales

Objetivo: Los estudiantes programarán su robot para viajar y crear nuevas palabras.

Materiales: 1 conjunto de KIBO por grupo de estudiantes, un módulo de expresión por KIBO, fichas, bolígrafo / marcador

Concepto KIBO: Secuenciación con bloques de programación KIBOs

Preparación de la actividad: revisar los diferentes bloques de KIBO. Identifique las palabras de tres letras con las que los estudiantes están familiarizados y tenga una vocal como una de las letras (por ejemplo, gato, murciélago, avión, autobús, perro, parte superior, gallina, babero, labio). Elija un puñado de palabras (al menos tantas palabras como robots) y escriba una palabra en cada tarjeta de índice; Sin embargo, no escriba la vocal. En su lugar, dibuje una línea para indicar que la vocal pertenece a esa área.

Descripción de la actividad: Los estudiantes elegirán una vocal (ya sea de su elección o asignada) para escribir en su Módulo de Expresión. Luego, programarán su robot para viajar desde un lugar designado a una de las tarjetas de índice. Para ir a una tarjeta de índice, la vocal en el Módulo de Expresión debe ser la vocal que completa la tarjeta de índice para crear una palabra real. Por ejemplo, si un grupo tiene una “e” escrita en su tarjeta de índice, su KIBO podría viajar a “h_n” y “j_t” pero no a “c_t”. Si lo desea, esta actividad se puede repetir, ya sea haciendo que los grupos cambien su Vocal o haz que los robots viajen a otra ficha.

Extensión de actividad: intente alargar las palabras o elegir palabras que tengan la misma vocal en dos lugares diferentes de una palabra.

En este caso introduce además de los apartados de titulo, descripción. Materiales, etc un apartado con el objetivo efectivo de la actividad (Goal): “Los estudiantes programarán su robot para viajar y crear nuevas palabras.” Que puede servir como en casos anteriores como criterio de dominio.

Propuestas de actividades

1. Preálgebra

Pre-álgebra para niños

Objetivo.- Vamos a intentar introducir un juego o una actividad para desarrollo de pensamiento abstracto, preálgebra, en niños.

Intervalo de edad.- Niños de entre 4 y 6 años. Conviene aclarar que el intervalo de edad lo hacemos de forma estimativa, porque igual podría el intervalo tomarse en función de otras características madurativas que se puedan tener en cuenta de manera convenientemente documentada y adaptada.

Materiales.- Youkara Youkara 1 PC es un juego infantil fabricado en China, cerca de Cantón, por la empresa Youkara, que se vende a través Amazon por el precio de 0,89€.

Descripción de la actividad.-

  1. Presentar y pedir al niño que realice de forma consecutiva operaciones de multiplicar, con barras y con números indistintamente, hasta que alcance un completo dominio:

  1. Cuando lo consiga, podemos empezar a proponer prácticas mezclando barritas con números, donde al cabo de un rato si bien puede identificar la cantidad con el dígito, también puede identificar la cantidad o el dígito con un ente sustitutivo:

  1. Cuando consiga esa familiarización podemos sustituir las barritas, en intentos alternativos, por una sola barrita o por un objeto,… y ver qué pasa:

Pidiendo al niño que diga a qué equivale o a qué ha sustituido el botón.

  1. En una última fase podemos pedir que diga a qué números corresponden los botones (u otro objeto) poniéndolos en distintas o en varias posiciones, como por ejemplo:

Repitiendo la operación hasta el dominio o hasta que el niño empiece a dar muestras de cansancio, pero rápidamente haciéndole ver el gran éxito que supone su logro.

  1. Podemos incluso utilizar el mismo botón para otros casos y ver en ellos a qué número o cantidad sustituye:

Y por último utilizar en vez de un botón otro objeto.

Si finalmente conseguimos que adquiera el dominio en casos así habremos conseguido que adquiera un concepto muy próximo al de incógnita, ecuación y variable.

La cuestión ahora estriba en formar a maestros y dotarles de guías adecuadas, en destrezas docentes para que desarrollen en los niños un pensamiento preabstracto, que pueda ser evocado posteriormente.

Comentario.- Esta actividad enlaza pues con el elemento,  de pensamiento computacional, que hemos considerado como pensamiento abstracto.

 

2. Pegatinas y circuitos lógicos.- Puertas lógicas. OR

Título.- Puerta lógica OR con pegatinas, leds y circuitos electrónicos

Objetivo.-

Se trata de construir con pegatinas de circuitos circuitos lógicos OR, AND y NOT, y que los niños lo manipulen, experimenten reiteradas veces y hablen sobre ello.

Empezamos con ésta dedicada a la puerta OR, pero con un esquema similar se pueden diseñar actividades para AND, NOT o XOR

Materiales.-  Etiquetas adhesivas y circuitos.- Pegatinas de circuito (peel-and-stick electronics for crafting circuits).

Se trata de un conjunto de herramientas que consta de componentes electrónicos para quitar el plástico y pegar, tales como LED y cintas de cobre como conductor. Con este kit de herramientas, los niños pequeños pueden crear proyectos interactivos de arte, o como artesanía, incrustados con adhesivos LED y sensores que responden al entorno o estímulos externos (ver la figura). Los niños pueden desarrollar su creatividad en actividades prácticas mientras aprenden y aplican conceptos básicos de electricidad, como son circuitos e interruptores. En este caso, incluso se puede aplicar para aprender circuitos lógicos.

Los circuitos electrónicos con pegativas (Peel-and-stick Electronics for Crafting Circuits)  se pueden encontrar en muchos sitios en internet, por ejemplo Circuit Sticker Starter Kit with Chinese Sketchbook – Peel-and-stick Electronics for Crafting Circuits[1]

 

Actividad

Construir, con luces leds y etiquetas, un circuito OR

El maestro debe de dar explicaciones (muy sencillas) sobre lo que es un circuito OR y lo que se esperan que los niños hagan (en pequeño grupo de dos o tres o de forma individual) enseñándole fotos e imágenes construidas por él, de la forma más próxima al resultado de lo que se espera que hagan. Y a ser posible mostrándoles un prototipo construido por él.

Se trata de que los niños adquieran una idea lo más cercana posible de lo que es y cómo funciona un circuito lógico OR.

Debe hacerlo funcionar tantas veces como haga falta con todas las posiciones de la tabla de verdad

Y enseñar el simbolismo

Por último explicar de forma combinada de todo y manipular hasta el dominio todas las posiciones y el sentido que tienen

Poner sencillos ejemplos de la vida real. Por ejemplo que su madre los mande a comprar:

“Helados y chuches”, y discutan cosas que puedan pasar y en cuales de ellas se cumple el recado.

También la madre les puede decir que traigan “helados o chuches”. En este caso también tienen que discutir cosas que puedan pasar y en cuales de ellas se cumple el recado.

[1][1]https://www.seeedstudio.com/Circuit-Sticker-Starter-Kit-with-Chinese-Sketchbook-Peel-and-stick-Electronics-for-Crafting-Circuits-p-1935.html


Este trabajo está bajo una licencia de Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 

DOI : 10.13140/RG.2.2.12945.48481

Debe ser citado como:

Zapata-Ros, M. (2018) Pensamiento computacional en los primeros ciclos educativos, un pensamiento computacional desenchufado. Blog RED de Hypotheses. El aprendizaje en la Sociedad del Conocimiento.  https://red.hypotheses.org/1662


Referencias.-

Bawden, D. (2001). Information and digital literacies: a review of concepts. Journal of Documentation57(2), 218–259.

Bawden, D. (2008). Origins and concepts of digital literacy. Digital literacies: Concepts, policies and practices, 17-32. http://sites.google.com/site/colinlankshear/DigitalLiteracies.pdf#page=19

Bell, T., Alexander, J., Freeman, I., & Grimley, M. (2009). Computer science unplugged: School students doing real computing without computers. The New Zealand Journal of Applied Computing and Information Technology13(1), 20-29. http://www.computingunplugged.org/sites/default/files/papers/Unplugged-JACIT2009submit.pdf

Bell, T., Andreae, P., & Robins, A. (2014). A case study of the introduction of computer science in NZ schools. ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE)14(2), 10. https://ir.canterbury.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10092/10570/12652431_NZ-case-study-TOCE-v5.pdf?seq. uence=1  y  https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2602485

Bell, T. y Vahrenhold, J. (2018). CS desenchufado: ¿cómo se usa y cómo funciona? En aventuras entre límites inferiores y altitudes superiores (pp. 497-521). Springer, Cham.

Chambers, J. (2015). Inside Singapore’s plans for robots in pre-schools. How a bold new scheme is teaching tech skills to 6 year olds. GovInsider.  https://govinsider.asia/smart-gov/exclusive-singapore-puts-robots-in-pre-schools/

Devlin, K. (2001) The Math Gene: How Mathematical Thinking Evolved and Why Numbers Are like Gossip. NY: Basic Books.

DevTech Research Group (2016). Literacy Activities with KIBO’s Expression Modulehttp://resources.kinderlabrobotics.com/resource/kibo-expression-module-literacy-activities/  http://resources.kinderlabrobotics.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2016/08/KIBO-Expression-Module-Activities.pdf

DevTech Research Group (October 2018). Where the Wild Things Are http://resources.kinderlabrobotics.com/resource/where-the-wild-things-are/  http://api.ning.com/files/v4ZZJy3ZUOe-9JkKS8PAGKUSlmkJV7E0G*7Oz8Mjzv8qvoDLYZzabUlbKp6HxUBEgEyKQUKUxgkHJ*rO9P6MepE3pWQypzcw/KIBOCurriculum_WheretheWildThingsAreEdited.pdf

Digital News Asia, (2015) https://www.digitalnewsasia.com/digital-economy/ida-launches-pilot-to-roll-out-tech-toys-for-preschoolers

Duncan, C., & Bell, T. (2015, November). A pilot computer science and programming course for primary school students. In Proceedings of the Workshop in Primary and Secondary Computing Education (pp. 39-48). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2818328

Gallagher, A., Thissen, S. & Hrdina, V. (2018). Little Coders Computational Thinking in K-2 Classrooms – NCCE 2019https://conference.ncce.org/uploads/NCCE2018/HANDOUTS/KEY_14396394/LittleCoders_NCCEConference_Feb2018.pptx

Graham, J. (2018 July). Meet the robots teaching Singapore’s kids tech. The interactive toys reduce time children spend in front of screens. Apolitical.  https://apolitical.co/solution_article/meet-the-robots-teaching-singapores-kids-tech/

IDA Singapore. (2015). IDA supports preschool centres with technology-enabled toys to build creativity and confidence in learning. Retrieved from: https://www.ida.gov.sg/About-Us/Newsroom/Media-Releases/ 2015/IDA-supports-preschool-centres-with-technology-enabled-toys-to-build-creativity-andconfidence-in-learning.

IMDA. (2017). PlayMaker Changing the Game. Retrieved Feb 13, 2017, from https://www.imda.gov.sg/infocomm-and-media-news/buzz-central/2015/10/playmaker-changing-the-game

Infocomm Media Development Authority (2017 November) PlayMaker Changing the Game. IMPACT INFOCOMM MEDIA TRENDS, INSIGHTS AND ANALYSIShttps://www.imda.gov.sg/infocomm-and-media-news/buzz-central/2015/10/playmaker-changing-the-game   

Infocomm Media Development Authority (2018 October) The game is on for PlayMaker. IMPACT INFOCOMM MEDIA TRENDS, INSIGHTS AND ANALYSIShttps://www.imda.gov.sg/infocomm-and-media-news/buzz-central/2018/10/the-game-is-on-for-playmaker

Ioannou, M., & Bratitsis, T. (2017, July). Teaching the notion of Speed in Kindergarten using the Sphero SPRK robot. In Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT), 2017 IEEE 17th International Conference on (pp. 311-312). IEEE.

Jovanov, M., Stankov, E., Mihova, M., Ristov, S., & Gusev, M. (2016, April). Computing as a new compulsory subject in the Macedonian primary schools curriculum. In Global Engineering Education Conference (EDUCON), 2016 IEEE (pp. 680-685). IEEE. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/7474623/

Lillard, A. S. (2011). What Belongs in a Montessori Primary Classroom?. Montessori Life23(3), 18.

Lockwood, J., & Mooney, A. (2017). Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it Fit? A systematic literary review. arXiv preprint arXiv:1703.07659.Pérez-Paredes, P., & Zapata-Ros, M. (2018). El pensamiento computacional, análisis de una competencia clave. Scotts Valley, CA, USA: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform. 

Merrill, M. D. (2002). First principles of instruction. Educational technology research and development, 50(3), 43-59. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02505024 y https://mdavidmerrill.com/Papers/firstprinciplesbymerrill.pdf

Merrill, M. D. (2007). First principles of instruction: A synthesis. In R. A. Reiser & J. V. Dempsey (Eds.), Trends and issues in instructional design and technology (2nd ed., pp. 62-71). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice-Hall.

Merrill, M. D. (2009). First principles of instruction. In C. M. Reigeluth & A. A. Carr-Chellman (Eds.), Instructional-design theories and models: Building a common knowledge base (Vol. III, pp. 41-56). New York: Routledge.

MONTESSORI, M. (1928). Antropología Pedagógica. Barcelona: Araluce

MONTESSORI, M. (1937). Método de la Pedagogía Científica. Barcelona: Araluce

MONTESSORI, M. (1935). Manual práctico del método. Barcelona: Araluce

Montessori, M. (1967). The Absorbent Mind. 1949. Trans. Claude A. Claremont. Holt, Rinehart, and Winston.

Montessori, M. (1991). The Advanced Montessori Method, Vol. 1. 1917. Trans. Florence Simmonds and Lily Hutchinson. Oxford: Clio.

Montessori, M. (1934). Psychogeometry. Trans. Benedetto Scoppola. Ed. Kay Baker. Laren, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2011. Retrans. of Psychogeometry Spanish ed.

Montessori, M. (1989). The Secret of Childhood. Trans. Barbara Barclay Carter. Hyderabad: Orient Longman: 1963. Montessori, Maria. What You Should Know About Your Child. Oxford: Clio.

Nurul A. (2016). Playmaker Project. The children were introduced to the robots named Bee-Bot and Kibo for this Playmaker Project. Recuperado de https://vimeo.com/179032348

Pérez-Paredes, P. & Zapata-Ros, M. (2018). El pensamiento computacional, análisis de una competencia clave. Scotts Valley, CA, USA: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform. https://www.amazon.es/pensamiento-computacional-analisis-competencia-clave/dp/1718987730/ref=sr_1_1

Reigeluth, C. M. (1999). What is instructional-design theory and how is it changing? In C. M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional-design theories and models: A new paradigm of instructional theory (Vol. II, pp. 5-29). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Reigeluth, C. M. (2016).  Teoría instruccional y tecnología para el nuevo paradigma de la educación. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia. Número 50. 30 de septiembre de 2016. Consultado el (dd/mm/aaa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/50

Sackett, G. (2014). “THE LINES THAT MAKE THE CLOUDS” THE ESSENCE OF THE MATHEMATICAL MIND IN THE FIRST SIx YEARS OF LIFE. NAMTA Journal, 39(2). https://static1.squarespace.com/static/519e5c43e4b036d1b98629c5/t/53a9a56ee4b0cae9d4e6564f/1403626862785/Sackett.pdf

Sackett, G. (sin fecha). The Mathematical Mindhttps://static1.squarespace.com/static/519e5c43e4b036d1b98629c5/t/527d3d72e4b07ed7f733eb15/1383939442753/Mathematical+Mind.pdf

Sullivan, A., & Bers, M. U. (2015). Robotics in the early childhood classroom: Learning outcomes from an 8-week robotics curriculum in pre-kindergarten through second grade. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi:10.1007/s10798-015-9304-5.

Sullivan, A., & Bers, M. U. (2017). Dancing robots: integrating art, music, and robotics in Singapore’s early childhood centers. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 1-22. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10798-017-9397-0  y https://sites.tufts.edu/devtech/files/2018/02/Dancing-Robots.pdf

Thompson, D., & Bell, T. (2013, November). Adoption of new computer science high school standards by New Zealand teachers. In Proceedings of the 8th Workshop in Primary and Secondary Computing Education (pp. 87-90). ACM. https://itp.nz/files/wipsce-teachers-2013.pdf y https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2532759

Zapata-Ros, M. (2014). Coding y pre-codingBlog Microposts, Tumblr http://miguelzapataros.tumblr.com/post/89143450350/coding-y-pre-coding

Zapata-Ros, M. (Noviembre 2014). ¿Por qué «pensamiento computacional»? (I)  Blog Pensamiento computacional y alfabetización digital / Computational thinking and computer literacy. http://computational-think.blogspot.com/2014/11/por-que-pensamiento-computacional-i.html

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED. Revista de educación a distancia, (46), 1-47. DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/red/46/4

Zapata-Ros, M. (2018a). El pensamiento computacional en la transición entre culturas epistemológicas. Blog RED El aprendizaje en la Sociedad del Conocimiento. Consultado el (dd/mm/aaa) en https://red.hypotheses.org/1235

Zapata-Ros, M. (2018). Pensamiento computacional. Una tercera competencia clave. (I) Blog RED El aprendizaje en la Sociedad del Conocimiento. Consultado el (dd/mm/aaa) en https://red.hypotheses.org/1059

 

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159). Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria. Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York. Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

Pensamiento computacional en los primeros ciclos educativos, un pensamiento computacional desenchufado (I)

 

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Murcia
ISSN 2386-8562
DOI : 10.13140/RG.2.2.12945.48481
 

Este artículo está bajo una licencia de Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0

Debe ser citado como

Zapata-Ros, M. (2018)Pensamiento computacional en los primeros ciclos educativos, un pensamiento computacional desenchufado (I1). Blog RED de Hypotheses. El aprendizaje en la Sociedad del Conocimiento.  https://red.hypotheses.org/1508

Introducción.-

La idea de pensamiento computacional desenchufado (Computational thinking unplugged) hace referencia al conjunto de actividades, y su diseño educativo, que se elaboran para fomentar en los niños, en las primeras etapas de desarrollo cognitivo (educación infantil, primer tramo de la educación primaria, juegos en casa con los padres y los amigos,…)  habilidades que luego pueden ser evocadas para favorecer y potenciar un buen aprendizaje del pensamiento computacional en otras etapas o en la formación técnica, profesional o en la universitaria incluso. Actividades que se suelen hacer con fichas, cartulinas, juegos de salón o de patio, juguetes mecánicos, etc.

Hay una serie de datos, ideas y circunstancias que avalan un trabajo como éste, y hacen posible ahora que se implementen actividades, iniciativas y experiencias de pensamiento computacional desenchufado. Es lo que intentamos exponer en la serie de posts que comienzan con éste.

Como anécdota, pero que es importante señalar a la hora de tener en cuenta cómo se ha forjado este trabajo y en qué contexto lo ha hecho, hay que decir que se ha originado  en las últimas actividades realizadas por el autor, a socaire de un ciclo organizado por ANEP-Uruguay y las Fundaciones Telefónica de Uruguay y de Argentina (ver los vídeos, éste y éste) de conferencias, talleres y eventos rurales en colegios y pueblos del interior de Uruguay, con niños y maestros de Primaria y de Secundaria. Pero sobre todo en el microclima que se creó en Arequipa, en el CITIE 2018, con la concurrencia derelevantísimos puntales en lo que ha sido el desarrollo del pensamiento computacional, con su experiencia y testimonio, como son entre otros Artemis Papert y Margaret Minsky, junto con otras individualidades que trabajan el tema.

 

En las fotos podemos ver en animado coloquio y trabajo a Artemis Papert, Margaret Minsky, Pascual Pérez Paredes, Raidell Avello y un servidor. En el ambiente de charlas, discusiones, exposiciones de ideas hubo una comunidad de enfoques que, además de poder modificar los esquemas de los participantes, abrió espacios de desarrollo en el trabajo de cada uno, así lo veo, y al menos en mi caso así fue. Y también explícitamente en el caso de Artemis para colaborar con sus ideas y con sus creaciones gráficas, a partir de Turtle Art y Tortugarte, en la elaboración de materiales para los ciclos iniciales de la educación. Obviamente sólo hubo un amplio consenso, eso sí, en las ideas centrales del proyecto que después debería ser ratificado en la práctica por equipos e instituciones, y sobre todo por las experiencias que se realicen.

 

 

Ése era el pues el ambiente que reinaba por las dependencias y los espacios del Hotel Conquistador de Arequipa. Ahí nacieron una serie de compromisos y una serie de ideas que voy a desarrollar estos días en esta colección de posts sobre el Pensamiento Computacional en las primeras etapas. 


Voy pues a comenzar una serie de entradas sobre este tipo de materiales. Para disipar equívocos desde el principio le voy a llamar, a este conjunto de posts, «Pensamiento computacional desenchufado» (eso es algo más que desconectado). En inglés ya existe la expresión «Computer Science Unplugged«. La ha utilizado Tim Bell de la University of Canterbury de Nueva Zelanda, con algunas diferencias prácticas y conceptuales que ya veremos. En definitiva queremos poner de relieve que lo importante es que los niños no jueguen con trastos, no solo digitales, sino ni tan siquiera enchufados… y que a pesar de ello adquieran pensamiento computacional. O quizás por ello.

En este trabajo pues vamos a abordar la necesidad y la conveniencia de trabajar aspectos del aprendizaje previo, convergente con el pensamiento computacional y necesario para él, desde las primeras etapas del desarrollo cognitivo de los individuos. Lo vamos a justificar desde el punto de vista de la teoría del aprendizaje y del de una pedagogía necesaria a ese fin. Vamos a hacerlo desde el punto de vista experiencial.

Vamos, para ello a proponer un tipo de actividades , a este nivel sólo de forma enunciativa y descriptiva, pero en lo posible lo más indicativa posible de cómo debería ser una propuesta más elaborada, y sobre todo la necesidad de guías para maestros y maestras de estos ciclos que doten de valor pedagógico en el sentido de los objetivos, tratados en el apartado anterior, propuestos para el pensamiento computacional. Orientar el diseño y la práctica en este sentido.

Hemos sostenido en trabajos anteriores (desde Noviembre de 2014) esa necesidad sobre la base de una perspectiva y de una opción, desde el punto de vista de que se trata de una nueva alfabetización, y que como tal el pensamiento computacional debe constituir una competencia o una serie de competencias claves en igualdad a como lo son las otras, las competencia claves de la alfabetización tradicional, la de la época industrial: La lectura, la escritura, el cálculo elemental y la geometría.

 

El principio de activación

Las destrezas del pensamiento computacional no podemos esperar que aparezcan de forma espontánea en el mismo momento en que se necesitan, en los estudios de grado o de secundaria superior.

Las habilidades que son necesarias para la programación de algoritmos complejos, las destrezas del pensamiento computacional en todo su vigor, es decir las que son necesarias para la programación de ordenadores, para resolver problemas, o para organizar el proceso y la circulación de datos, así como para que los ordenadores realices tareas las tareas para las que están construidos, estas habilidades, no podemos esperar a que aparezcan, o a se manifiesten de forma espontánea. Y que lo hagan en el mismo momento de necesitarlas en los estudios de grado de Computación o de Ingeniería Informática, en la etapa de madurez del alumno que corresponde a esa edad, ni tan siquiera en la etapa de desarrollo del pensamiento abstracto, en la secundaria postobligatoria, o incluso en secundaria obligatoria. 

En esto estas habilidades no son distintas de otras habilidades complejas que tienen que ver con el desarrollo de los individuos, que se adquieren de forma progresiva y que sólo son utilizables en forma operativa en su última fase.

Esta naturaleza del aprendizaje, el enlace de las situaciones de aprendizaje con los objetivos finales a través de etapas, niveles y condiciones de aprendizaje, es la que justifica el diseño instruccional y de ello no se libra la adquisición de las habilidades computacionales ni, siendo distinto, el pensamiento computacional: Los aprendizajes complejos se dividen, se fraccionan en aprendizajes más simples, más cercanos a las capacidades de los individuos y más lejanos del momento que adquieren su mayor eficiencia o su mayor operatividad práctica, o incluso que nunca lo alcancen porque no exista, como sucede en el caso que no lo alcancen ese punto en su dominio propio, por sí mismas, sino como habilidades auxiliares a otras. Así pasa con los conocimientos y las habilidades básicas y con las competencias clave.

En este punto es donde obtienen su justificación en las teorías del aprendizaje, en el principio de activación, y en la forma en como transitar desde que se adquieren las habilidades hasta que son útiles en su destino final. Este tránsito y la forma de organizarlo es lo que constituye la base del diseño instruccional. Por tanto son dos núcleos clave que está en la justificación en la teoría del aprendizaje y en la base de una pedagogía del pensamiento computacional: El principio de activación y el diseño instruccional.

En esta parte nos vamos a dedicar exclusivamente al principio de activación. Dejaremos para otra ocasión o para después, aquí en esta serie de posts, en el apartado de las guías de actividades, el diseño instruccional. La otra cuestión, la consideración del pensamiento computacional como competencia clave de la nueva alfabetización tampoco la abordaremos en este punto, es una elaboración o una consecuencia elaborada del principio de activación.

Así pues vamos a justificar con este principio la necesidad y la conveniencia de trabajar aspectos del aprendizaje previos, convergente con el pensamiento computacional y necesarios para él, desde las primeras etapas del desarrollo cognitivo de los individuos. Es lo que va a justificar después qué actividades y como se organizan juegos en la infancia para que habilidades de secuenciación o de encaje, entre objetos computacionales o entre variables y tipos de datos, por ejemplo, se activen y fluyan en la fase de resolver problemas con algoritmos y programas en las etapas de enseñanza profesional o universitaria. Esto obviamente sería una ejemplificación extrema. En un caso más normal, la adquisición se produciría de una forma más progresiva a través de las distintas etapas educativas, los niveles e incluso dentro de estos y de los módulos y unidades instruccionales que los componen.

En su trabajo, Merrill (2002) desarrolla lo que llama unos principios fundamentales del aprendizaje (first priciples) lo hace decantando los principios subyacentes en los que hay consensos, en los que hay un acuerdo esencial, en todas las teorías y que previamente ha identificado. Ese trabajo está expuesto y desarrollado en su trabajo First principles of instruction (Merrill, 2002). en Educational technology research and development, incluido como capítulo en el tercer volumen de los libros de Reigueluth  Instructional-design theories and models: Building a common knowledge base (Merrill, 2009). Y de forma resumida en First principles of instruction: A synthesis (Merrill, 2007). También son glosados como base del nuevo paradigma instruccional de Reigeluth, cuya versión oficial pueden encontrar en RED número 50, en el artículo Teoría instruccional y tecnología para el nuevo paradigma de la educación (Reigeluth, 2016). 

En este último trabajo, Reigeluth (2016) distingue entre principios universales y escenarios particulares. Cuando aplicamos con mayor precisión un principio o un método instruccional, por lo general descubrimos que hace falta que éste sea diferente para diferentes situaciones y perfiles de aprendizaje, o una mayor precisión para obtener objetivos contextualizados y personalizados. Reigeluth (1999) se refirió a los factores contextuales que influyen en los efectos de los métodos como «escenarios».

Los principios fundamentales de instrucción (first priciples) los propone y los define Merrill (2002) en First principles of instruction. Este documento se refiere a los métodos variables como programas y prácticas. Un principio fundamental (Merrill, 2002), o un método básico según Reigueluth (1999a), es un aserto que siempre es verdadero bajo las condiciones apropiadas independientemente del programa o de la práctica en que se aplique, que de  esta forma dan lugar a un método variable. Teniendo en cuenta como el mismo Merrill (2002) las define:

Una práctica es una actividad instruccional específica. Un programa es un enfoque que consiste en un conjunto de prácticas prescritas. Las prácticas siempre implementan o no implementan los principios subyacentes ya sea que estos principios se especifiquen o no. Un enfoque de instrucción dado solo puede enfatizar la implementación de uno o más de estos principios de instrucción. Los mismos principios pueden ser implementados por una amplia variedad de programas y prácticas.

De esta forma Merrill propuso un conjunto de cinco principios instruccionales prescriptivos (o “principios fundamentales”) que mejoran la calidad de la enseñanza en todas las situaciones (Merrill, 2007 , 2009 ). Esos principios tienen que ver con la centralidad de la tarea, la activación, la demostración, la aplicación y la integración.

Para ello Merrill (2002) propone un esquema en fases como el más eficiente para el aprendizaje, de manera que centran el problema y crean un entorno que implica al alumno  para la resolución de cualquier problema En cuatro fases distintas, cuando habitualmente solo se hace en una: la de demostración, reduciendo todo el problema a que el alumno pueda demostrar su conocimiento o su habilidad en la resolución del problema en una última fase. 

Son las FASES DE INSTRUCCIÓN

Las fases son (a) activación de experiencia previa, (b) demostración de habilidades, (c) aplicación de habilidades, y (d) integración de estas habilidades en actividades del mundo real.

Así la figura anterior proporciona un marco conceptual para establecer y relacionar los principios fundamentales de la instrucción. De ellos uno tiene que ver con la implicación y la naturaleza real del problema, así percibida por el alumno, y los cuatro restantes para cada una de las fases. Así estos cinco principios enunciados en su forma más concisa (Merrill 2002) son

  1. El aprendizaje se promueve cuando los estudiantes se comprometen a resolver problemas del mundo real. Es decir el aprendizaje se promueve cuando es un aprendizaje centrado en la tarea.
  2. El aprendizaje se favorece cuando existen conocimientos que se activan como base para el nuevo conocimiento.
  3. El aprendizaje se promueve cuando se centra en que el alumno debe demostrar su nuevo conocimiento. Y el alumno es consciente de ello.
  4. El aprendizaje se promueve igualmente cuando se centra en que el aprendiz aplique el nuevo conocimiento. Y por último
  5. El aprendizaje se favorece cuando el nuevo conocimiento se tienede a que se integre en el mundo del alumno.

Pero, de todos estos principios, el que justifica sobremanera la inclusión del pensamiento computacional, como pensamiento computacional desenchufado en las primeras etapas, es el principio de activación. En él nos vamos a centrar, y no sólo en su aplicación para el diseño instruccional en la fase de activación, en la que el conocimiento existente se activa, sino en las fases en las que se crean los conocimientos y habilidades que son activados, y en cómo hacerlo para que la activación sea más eficiente.

En su trabajo Teoría instruccional y tecnología para el nuevo paradigma de la educación, Reigeluth (2016 pág. 4) caracteriza el principio de activación de manera que

  • El diseño educativo de actividades, organización, recursos, etc. debe ser tendente a activar en los alumnos estructuras cognitivas relevantes, haciéndoles recordar, describir o demostrar conocimientos o experiencias previas que sean relevantes para él.
  • La activación puede ser social. La instrucción debe lograr que los estudiantes compartan sus experiencias anteriores entre ellos.
  • La instrucción debe hacer que los estudiantes recuerden o adquieran una estructura para organizar los nuevos conocimientos.

Los trabajos de Merrill (2002) y Reigeluth (2016) hacen énfasis en la fase de evocación, pero no en la fase de crear estructuras cognitivas, experiencias y en general conocimientos y habilidades que puedan ser evocados. Ni tampoco en crear una pedagogía o un diseño educativo que incluya, o tendente a favorecer, elementos cognitivos de enlace que promuevan la evocación. Tampoco a fomentar la investigación sobre estos temas, o a investigar qué tipos de enlaces fortalecen más las estructuras cognitivas de enlace y de evocación.

A partir de lo que dicen, sobre las características del diseño instruccional que implica el principio de activación, los ítems anteriores, podemos concluir que la instrucción, en la fase de crear elementos para ser evocadora, debe:

  • Crear estructuras cognitivas que incluyan conocimientos, habilidades, elementos de reconocimiento que permitan distinguir al alumno y otorgar relevancia en su momento de forma fluida a esas habilidades para conseguir su efectividad en ese momento a partir de elementos contextuales, metáforas, etc
  • Otorgar a esas habilidades elementos de reconocimiento que permitan la evocación.
  • Asociar esas habilidades a tareas que tengan similitud con las que se en su momento sean necesarias para resolver los problemas a los que ayuda la evocación. En nuestro caso, a los problemas computacionales, o habilidades propias a los elementos que constituyen el pensamiento computacional.
  • Diseñar instruccionalmente las actividades que sean relevantes para evocar los elementos de pensamiento computacional (Pérez-Paredes y Zapata-Ros, 2018)
  • Propiciar experiencias de aprendizaje compartido en las primeras etapas y hacer que esos grupos y experiencias sociales sean estables a lo largo del tiempo. Las experiencias compartidas crean elementos de activación a través de grupos o de pares alumnos. El propiciar grupos y claves de comunicación, de lenguaje, y que esos grupos sean estables a lo largo del tiempo aumenta la potencia de evocación.
  • Crear estructuras cognitivas en los alumnos capaces de recomponerse y aumentar en el futuro. Dotar a los conocimientos y habilidades de referencias y de metadatos que permitan ser recuperados mediante evocación.

Debe pues potenciarse una pedagogía que atribuya valores a estas ideas y principios para aplicar en las primeras etapas de educación.

Los First principles of instruction (Merrill, 2002) se publicaron en el III Volumen de la obra dirigida por Charles Reigeluth Instructional-Design Theories and Models, (Instructional-Design Theories and Models, Volume III: Building a Common Knowledge Base).

El principio de activación es pues clave para tenerlo en cuenta cuando se diseña la educación infantil y del primer ciclo de primaria teniendo en el horizonte los aprendizajes futuros, también el Pensamiento Computacional.

Merrill ha sido quien más lo ha trabajado, pero no sólo.

Como señalamos en otro trabajo (Zapata-Ros, 2018), Bawden (2008) habla de habilidades de recuperación, y remite a lo expuestas en otro trabajo anterior (Bawden, 2001). En las habilidades que señala se constatan ideas como la de construir un “bagaje de información fiable” de diversas fuentes, la importancia de las habilidades de recuperación, utilizando una forma de “pensamiento crítico” para hacer juicios informados sobre la información recuperada, y para asegurar la validez e integridad de las fuentes de Internet, leer y comprender de forma dinámica y cambiante material no secuencial. Y así una serie de habilidades donde como novedad se introducen las affordances de conocimiento en entornos sociales y de comunicación en redes, y la idea de relevancia. Sólo que en este caso son habilidades sobre el proceso de la información, y su posterior recuperación. Obviamente no son habilidades para desarrollar en esta etapa. Sin embargo sí sería interesante indagar sobre la  recuperación de habilidades que se desarrollan mediante juegos de infancia como son habilidades cinestésicas.

 

Pensamiento computacional en la infancia.-

Desde junio de 2014 hemos argumentado, aportando muy diversas razones, acerca de por qué debían incluirse en el curriculum de Educación Infantil y de primaria actividades de Pensamiento Computacional. He aquí un resumen.

En el apartado anterior hemos hablado del principio de activación. Basándonos en él hemos sostenido desde hace tiempo la necesidad de favorecer aprendizajes a través de juegos y de otras actividades que estén cognitiva o cinestésicamente conectadas con las habilidades de computación. También hemos sostenido que esto es fácilmente asimilable por el público no especializado (Zapata-Ros, 2014): Al igual que sucede con los deportistas y con los músicos, a los niños para que programen bien, o simplemente para que no se vean excluidos de esta nueva alfabetización, que es el pensamiento computacional en la Sociedad del Conocimiento, debería fomentarse en ellos desde las primeras etapas competencias que puedan ser activadas en otras etapas de desarrollo, y en otras fases  de la instrucción, correspondientes a las etapas del pensamiento abstracto y a las de rendimiento profesional. Y citábamos el desarrollo de determinadas habilidades, como son las  de seriación, encaje, modularización, organización espacial, etc., que, en estudios posteriores de grado, de bachillerato o de formación profesional, pudiesen ser activadas para elaborar procedimientos y funciones en la creación de códigos, o para desarrollar algoritmos propios de esta etapa.

Así lo decíamos el 18 de junio de 2014 en Tumblr

La idea que algunos tenemos es la de que no hay que esperar a la universidad ni tan siquiera a la educación secundaria para iniciar el aprendizaje de habilidades de programación, y que al igual a como sucede en otras habilidades instrumentales (cálculo o lectura) y claves o con competencias que empiezan a desarrollarse en las primeras etapas de la vida (música, danza), las habilidades necesarias para la codificación han de ser detectadas y desarrolladas desde las primeras etapas. Es la precodificación (precoding) o el desarrollo del pensamiento computacional.

El 5 de Noviembre de 2014:

“(…) es fundamental que, al igual que sucede con la música, con la danza o con la práctica de deportes, se fomente una práctica formativa del pensamiento computacional desde las primeras etapas de desarrollo. Y para ello, al igual que se pone en contacto a los niños con un entorno musical o de práctica de danza o deportiva,… se haga con un entorno de objetos que promuevan, que fomenten, a través de la observación y de la manipulación, aprendizajes adecuados para favorecer este pensamiento. No tenemos en muchos casos evidencias de que esos entornos y esas manipulaciones desarrollen las destrezas, habría que fomentar investigaciones para tenerlas, pero sí sospechamos fuertemente que ocurre. 

Tradicionalmente se ha hablado de aprendizajes  o de destrezas concretas: Seriación, discriminación de objetos por propiedades, en las primeras etapas, y en las del pensamiento abstracto o para la resolución de problemas se ha hablado de la modularización, el análisis descendente, el análisis ascendente, la recursividad,…

Para lo primero hay multitud de recursos, juegos y actividades que los educadores infantiles conocen bien.” (Zapata-Ros, Noviembre 2014)

En el artículo de RED (Zapata-Ros, 2015) Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital

Hay por tanto multitud de áreas del aprendizaje que conviene explorar e investigar en esta nueva frontera. Y en la planificación de los curricula tendrá que plantearse esta dicotomía: Enseñar a programar con dificultad  progresiva (si se quiere incluso de forma lúdica o con juegos) o favorecer este nuevo tipo de pensamiento. Obviamente no hace falta decir que nuestra propuesta es la segunda, que además incluye a la primera.

En el blog RED de Hypotheses (Zapata-Ros, 2018b):

Por otro lado de igual forma que se habla de prelectura, pre-escritura o precálculo para nombrar competencias que allanan el camino a las destrezas clave y a las competencias instrumentales que anuncian, cabe hablar de precodificación para designar las competencias que son previas y necesarias en las fases anteriores del desarrollo para la codificación. Nos referimos por ejemplo a construcciones mentales que permiten alojar características de objetos de igual forma a como lo hacen las variables con los valores: Son en este caso el color, la forma, el tamaño,… O también operaciones con estos rasgos como son la seriación. Evidentemente hay muchas más habilidades y más complejas en su análisis y en el diseño de actividades y entornos para que este aprendizaje se produzca. Este ámbito de la instrucción es lo que podría denominarse precodificación, (…)

En el capítulo “Pensamiento computacional. Una tercera competencia clave”, del libro El pensamiento computacional, análisis de una competencia clave (Pérez-Paredes & Zapata-Ros, 2018) se dice:

Tradicionalmente, en el diseño curricular de las primeras etapas de desarrollo se ha hablado de aprendizajes  o de destrezas concretas que en un futuro predispondría a los aprendices para aprender mejor en un futuro habilidades matemáticas, geométricas, de lenguaje, como son la seriación, el encaje, la discriminación de objetos por propiedades, en las primeras etapas, y también en las de desarrollo del pensamiento abstracto o para la resolución de problemas. Así se ha hablado de la modularización, del análisis descendente, de análisis ascendente, de recursividad, e incluso de sinéctica y de cinestesia… En la perspectiva Montessori (1928, 1935 y 1937) por ejemplo esto es básico. Para ello se han desarrollado ya multitud de recursos, juegos y actividades que los educadores infantiles conocen bien.

En ese mismo capítulo hablamos de los programas y trabajos que se desarrollan en UK, EE UU como programas específicos dentro del currículum oficial que implementan pensamiento Computacional en Educación Infantil (Key stage 1 in UK) y que veremos en la parte de materiales de este mismo post, o en el post de esta serie dedicado a materiales.

 

Iniciativas ya existentes

Nos referimos a iniciativas ya existentes de pensamiento computacional, con actividades no estrictamente de programación, como competencias claves, ya incluidas en el curriculum oficial de Educación Infantil o de etapas equivalentes, Key stage 1 in UK,  etc. y al primer ciclo de primaria. Con ligeras variantes, son las edades y ciclos escolares que hay hasta los 8 años.

En el libro El pensamiento computacional, análisis de una competencia clave (Pérez-Paredes & Zapata-Ros, 2018), en la parte final, a partir de la página 89, hacíamos en una tabla un resumen de las situaciones del Pensamiento Computacional en los distintos sistemas educativos de los países en los que hemos encontrado que éste está recogido en los curricula, en el sentido que se apunta en el libro, y que sostenemos en este trabajo: como competencias transversales o competencias clave que sirven para favorecer el aprendizaje de la informática y de la programación, pero también para la resolución de problemas en otras materias aportando sus formas de pensamiento y métodos específicos, y también para problemas de la vida cotidiana.

De ella entresacamos las experiencias e incidencias que tienen que ver con el pensamiento computacional desenchufado en las primeras etapas. En la época en que se hizo el trabajo sólo pudimos detectar, a partir de lo publicado en papers que difunden experiencias, con investigaciones aparejadas que aseguraban un mínimo de rigor y consistencia en su desarrollo y conclusiones, dos casos propiamente dichos que cumplieran estos requisitos: incorporar el pensamiento computacional como competencia clave que fuese en estas etapas iniciales y que estuviese recogido como parte del curriculum oficial de sus países, o sistemas educativos. Se trata de CS Unplugged en Nueva Zelanda, y del programa PlayMaker de Singapur. También incluimos, aunque propiamente no se puede considerar que cumple estos requisitos,  el caso de una propuesta de currículum, ya introducido en su país, Macedonia, que hacen  Jovanov et al (2016, April)  titulado «Trabajar con computadoras y conceptos básicos de programación» o simplemente «Computación», para abreviar. Ofrecen una visión general del estado de la educación informática en Macedonia antes del currículo propuesto y luego ofrecen una visión general de la nueva materia introductoria para alumnos de ocho años. La incluimos aquí porque, aunque es híbrido de programación y de juegos, es otra iniciativa que prescinde de la computación y de los ordenadores para desarrollar el pensamiento computacional, aunque sólo sea en parte.

En cada uno de los tres casos describimos primero qué se hace o qué hay, luego describo la situación en el contexto del curriculum y del sistema educativo oficial, las características del caso en relación con la características definitorias que hemos propuesto (programación sólo / desarrollo de competencias específicas como área transversal), y por último decimos las referencias de los documentos de donde hemos obtenido la información.

NUEVA ZELANDA

¿Qué hay?

CS Unplugged es una colección de actividades de aprendizaje gratuitas que enseñan Ciencias de la Computación a través de interesantes juegos y acertijos, que usan tarjetas, cuerdas, lápices de colores y muchos juegos como los de Ikea o Montesori-Amazon, del tipo de los que explicamos en el artículo de referencia de este trabajo (Zapata-Ros, 2015) y en el libro  El pensamiento computacional, análisis de una competencia clave (Pérez-Paredes & Zapata-Ros, 2018). Fue desarrollado para que los jóvenes estudiantes puedan interactuar con la informática, experimentar los tipos de preguntas y desafíos que experimentan los científicos informáticos, pero sin tener que aprender primero la programación.

Las actividades para las primeras etapas podemos verlas en web [i]

Bell, Alexander, Freeman y Grimley (2009) son ​​los investigadores responsables del proyecto CS Unplugged y en el documento Computer science unplugged: School students doing real computing without computers dan una visión general inicial del proyecto y también exploran por qué se ha popularizado y describen las diferentes formas en que se ha adaptado, que son

  •         Vídeos de diferentes actividades
  •          Hacer pulseras codificadas en binario
  •          Competiciones
  •          Adaptar las actividades de CS Unplugged a diferentes temas del currículo.
  •          Actividades al aire libre
  •          Actividad en línea

También analizan y justifican los principios de aprendizaje al diseñar las actividades y discuten sus planes futuros.

Situación en el curriculum

El programa CS Unplegged es un programa completo de actividades desarrollado por CS Education Research Group [ii] en la Universidad de Canterbury, Nueva Zelanda. Está explicado por Bell et al (2009) y por James Lockwood y Aidan Mooney.

Básicamente está orientado a Educación Secundaria e informa al  Certificado Nacional de Secundaria que incluye Ciencias de la Computación entendidas en el sentido de PC.

Pero esto implica actividades incluidas en el curriculum para etapas anteriores a partir de los cinco años.

Referencias

Computer science unplugged: School students doing real computing without computers. Bell, T., Alexander, J., Freeman, I., & Grimley, M. (2009). [iii]

A case study of the introduction of computer science in NZ schools. Bell, T., Andreae, P., & Robins, A. (2014)[iv]

A pilot computer science and programming course for primary school students. Duncan, C., & Bell, T. (2015, November).[v]

Adoption of new computer science high school standards by New Zealand teachers. Thompson, D., & Bell, T. (2013, November). [vi]

Estos trabajos e investigaciones están reseñados  además en Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit? A systematic literary review. James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.[vii]

SINGAPUR

¿Qué hay?

Para abordar la creciente necesidad de nuevos programas de tecnología educativa (en este caso de Pensamiento Computacional a través fundamentalmente de robótica) en las aulas de la primera infancia, se lanzó el programa PlayMaker de Singapur. Es un programa en línea destinado a los maestros, para introducir a los niños más pequeños a la tecnología (Chambers, 2015; Digital News Asia, 2015). Según Steve Leonard, vicepresidente de la Autoridad de Desarrollo de Infocomm de Singapur (IDA), «a medida que Singapur se convierta en una nación inteligente, nuestros hijos necesitarán sentirse cómodos creando con tecnología» (IDA Singapur, 2015).

Aprovechando el creciente movimiento STEM, el objetivo del programa PlayMaker no es solo promover el conocimiento técnico sino también brindar a los niños herramientas para divertirse, practicar la resolución de problemas y generar confianza y creatividad (Chambers, 2015; Digital News Asia, 2015).

Como parte del programa PlayMaker, 160 centros preescolares en Singapur fueron dotados de una variedad de juguetes tecnológicos que involucran a los niños con la robótica, la programación, la construcción y la ingeniería, incluyendo: BeeBot, Circuit Stickers y la robótica KIBO (Chambers 2015). Además del lanzamiento de nuevas herramientas, los educadores de la primera infancia también recibieron capacitación en un simposio de 1 día sobre cómo usar y enseñar con cada una de estas herramientas (Chambers 2015).

Estas escuelas piloto también reciben apoyo técnico continuo y asistencia con la integración curricular como parte de este enfoque integral (IDA Singapur, 2015).

El estudio de referencia (Sullivan & Bers, 2017) se centra en evaluar los resultados de aprendizaje y compromiso de una de las herramientas de Playmaker implementadas: el kit de robótica KIBO. KIBO es un kit de construcción de robótica diseñado específicamente para niños de 4 a 7 años de edad para aprender habilidades básicas de ingeniería y programación (Sullivan y Bers 2015). Las características del kit KIBO y cómo se utilizó se describen en detalle en la sección »Métodos’ del estudio’. Además de evaluar los conceptos técnicos que los niños dominan con KIBO, este estudio también examina el potencial de la robótica KIBO para promover conductas personales y sociales positivas en niños pequeños. Finalmente, describe la experiencia desde la perspectiva de los docentes.

Situación en el curriculum

El objetivo del programa piloto PlayMaker de Singapur es proporcionar ejemplos de éxitos y de áreas donde mejorar  el trabajo futuro en implementación de PC en primeras etapas. Estos ejemplos  se ofrecen como  resultados válidos de este año en el que se ha llevado a cabo la experiencia piloto del programa Playmaker de Singapur que puede ser útil no solo para el trabajo futuro en este país, sino también en otros países que están desarrollando nuevos programas para la educación de la primera infancia.

Referencias

Sullivan, A., & Bers, M. U. (2017). Dancing robots: integrating art, music, and robotics in Singapore’s early childhood centers. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 1-22.[viii]

Como hemos dicho, estas situaciones se producen tanto en Educación Infantil como en Primaria, además hay un caso que es interesante y que se da también en primaria, pero en el que se mezclan elementos de pensamiento computacional como programación y como juegos, nos referimos al caso de Macedonia

 

MACEDONIA

¿Qué hay?

Jovanov, M., Stankov, E., Mihova, M., Ristov, S., & Gusev, M. (2016, April) presentan en EDUCON, 2016 IEEE, una descripción general de una aportación al currículo macedónico, introducida en 2015, titulada «Trabajar con computadoras y conceptos básicos de programación» o simplemente «Computación», para abreviar. Ofrecen una visión general del estado de la educación informática en Macedonia antes de esta propuesta, hacen un análisis  y luego ofrecen una visión general de la nueva materia introductoria para alumnos de ocho años. En su comunicación dan una visión general del contenido que incluye siete unidades que se impartirán en dos clases por semana.

Lo presentan en el congreso  (Jovanov, M., Stankov, E., Mihova, M., Ristov, S. and Gusev, M., 2016, April) Global Engineering Education Conference (EDUCON), 2016 IEEE con el título Computing as a new compulsory subject in the Macedonian primary schools curriculum.

En ella comunicaron que llevaron a cabo una investigación sobre esta integración curricular. En este trabajo, considerado documento de referencia, y en la propia investigación se centran en el cambio introducido en el currículo macedonio. Presentan el plan de estudios propuesto y aceptado, con énfasis en los temas sobre pensamiento computacional y programación. También discuten el software disponible y las herramientas adecuadas para la implementación de los temas mencionados en la propuesta, y presentan un juego recientemente desarrollado. Al final explican la formación necesaria de los profesores,y el formato de la capacitación preliminar de todos los maestros de escuela primaria en el país.

La investigación incluye las primeras impresiones de los capacitadores que realizaron la capacitación, y la elaboración de las opiniones de los maestros.

En su trabajo Jovanov et al. (2016) comunican que en la iniciativa organizan los contenidos  en siete unidades que se impartirán en dos clases por semana:

  • Primeros pasos para usar la computadora
  • Gráficos por computadora
  • Procesamiento de texto
  • Vida en línea
  • Concepto de algoritmos y programas
  • Pensamiento computacional a través de un juego
  • Creación de programas simples

Obviamente destacamos en el sentido propuesto de pensamiento computacional desenchufado las unidades quinta y sexta. En ésta a los estudiantes se les enseña la noción de programación y aprenden a través de un juego, el DigitMile,  que fue especialmente diseñado para ser utilizado en este plan de estudios junto con él.

Situación en el curriculum

En el documento de referencia tenemos constancia y la descripción de la situación y los presupuestos sobre pensamiento computacional que llevaron a los responsables políticos en Macedonia a incluir la programación como parte de una nueva asignatura obligatoria para los alumnos a la edad de 8 años

Referencias

Reseñado en Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit? . A systematic literary review . James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

Documento base: Jovanov, M., Stankov, E., Mihova, M., Ristov, S., & Gusev, M. (2016, April). Computing as a new compulsory subject in the Macedonian primary schools curriculum.



Referencias del post en formato APA.-

Bell, T., Alexander, J., Freeman, I., & Grimley, M. (2009). Computer science unplugged: School students doing real computing without computers. The New Zealand Journal of Applied Computing and Information Technology13(1), 20-29. http://www.computingunplugged.org/sites/default/files/papers/Unplugged-JACIT2009submit.pdf

Bell, T., Andreae, P., & Robins, A. (2014). A case study of the introduction of computer science in NZ schools. ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE)14(2), 10. https://ir.canterbury.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10092/10570/12652431_NZ-case-study-TOCE-v5.pdf?seq. uence=1  y  https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2602485

Chambers, J. (2015). Inside Singapore’s plans for robots in pre-schools. GovInsider. Retrieved from: https://govinsider.asia/smart-gov/exclusive-singapore-puts-robots-in-pre-schools/

Digital News Asia, (2015) https://www.digitalnewsasia.com/digital-economy/ida-launches-pilot-to-roll-out-tech-toys-for-preschoolers

Duncan, C., & Bell, T. (2015, November). A pilot computer science and programming course for primary school students. In Proceedings of the Workshop in Primary and Secondary Computing Education (pp. 39-48). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2818328

IDA Singapore. (2015). IDA supports preschool centres with technology-enabled toys to build creativity and confidence in learning. Retrieved from: https://www.ida.gov.sg/About-Us/Newsroom/Media-Releases/ 2015/IDA-supports-preschool-centres-with-technology-enabled-toys-to-build-creativity-andconfidence-in-learning.

Jovanov, M., Stankov, E., Mihova, M., Ristov, S., & Gusev, M. (2016, April). Computing as a new compulsory subject in the Macedonian primary schools curriculum. In Global Engineering Education Conference (EDUCON), 2016 IEEE (pp. 680-685). IEEE. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/7474623/

Lockwood, J., & Mooney, A. (2017). Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it Fit? A systematic literary review. arXiv preprint arXiv:1703.07659.Pérez-Paredes, P., & Zapata-Ros, M. (2018). El pensamiento computacional, análisis de una competencia clave. Scotts Valley, CA, USA: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform. 

 

[i] https://www.csunplugged.org/en/topics/

[ii] http://cosc.canterbury.ac.nz/research/RG/CSE/

[iii] http://www.computingunplugged.org/sites/default/files/papers/Unplugged-JACIT2009submit.pdf

[iv] https://ir.canterbury.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10092/10570/12652431_NZ-case-study-TOCE-v5.pdf?sequence=1  y  https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2602485

[v] https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2818328

[vi] https://itp.nz/files/wipsce-teachers-2013.pdf y https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2532759

[vii] https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1703/1703.07659.pdf

[viii] https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10798-017-9397-0

 

Referencias.-

Bawden, D. (2001). Information and digital literacies: a review of concepts. Journal of Documentation57(2), 218–259.

Bawden, D. (2008). Origins and concepts of digital literacy. Digital literacies: Concepts, policies and practices, 17-32. http://sites.google.com/site/colinlankshear/DigitalLiteracies.pdf#page=19

Bell, T., Alexander, J., Freeman, I., & Grimley, M. (2009). Computer science unplugged: School students doing real computing without computers. The New Zealand Journal of Applied Computing and Information Technology13(1), 20-29. http://www.computingunplugged.org/sites/default/files/papers/Unplugged-JACIT2009submit.pdf

Bell, T., Andreae, P., & Robins, A. (2014). A case study of the introduction of computer science in NZ schools. ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE)14(2), 10. https://ir.canterbury.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10092/10570/12652431_NZ-case-study-TOCE-v5.pdf?seq. uence=1  y  https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2602485

Bell, T., y Vahrenhold, J. (2018). CS desenchufado: ¿cómo se usa y cómo funciona? En aventuras entre límites inferiores y altitudes superiores (pp. 497-521). Springer, Cham.

Chambers, J. (2015). Inside Singapore’s plans for robots in pre-schools. GovInsider. Retrieved from: https://govinsider.asia/smart-gov/exclusive-singapore-puts-robots-in-pre-schools/

Digital News Asia, (2015) https://www.digitalnewsasia.com/digital-economy/ida-launches-pilot-to-roll-out-tech-toys-for-preschoolers

Duncan, C., & Bell, T. (2015, November). A pilot computer science and programming course for primary school students. In Proceedings of the Workshop in Primary and Secondary Computing Education (pp. 39-48). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2818328

IDA Singapore. (2015). IDA supports preschool centres with technology-enabled toys to build creativity and confidence in learning. Retrieved from: https://www.ida.gov.sg/About-Us/Newsroom/Media-Releases/ 2015/IDA-supports-preschool-centres-with-technology-enabled-toys-to-build-creativity-andconfidence-in-learning.

Jovanov, M., Stankov, E., Mihova, M., Ristov, S., & Gusev, M. (2016, April). Computing as a new compulsory subject in the Macedonian primary schools curriculum. In Global Engineering Education Conference (EDUCON), 2016 IEEE (pp. 680-685). IEEE. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/7474623/

Lockwood, J., & Mooney, A. (2017). Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it Fit? A systematic literary review. arXiv preprint arXiv:1703.07659.Pérez-Paredes, P., & Zapata-Ros, M. (2018). El pensamiento computacional, análisis de una competencia clave. Scotts Valley, CA, USA: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform. 

Merrill, M. D. (2002). First principles of instruction. Educational technology research and development, 50(3), 43-59. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02505024 y https://mdavidmerrill.com/Papers/firstprinciplesbymerrill.pdf

Merrill, M. D. (2007). First principles of instruction: A synthesis. In R. A. Reiser & J. V. Dempsey (Eds.), Trends and issues in instructional design and technology (2nd ed., pp. 62-71). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice-Hall.

Merrill, M. D. (2009). First principles of instruction. In C. M. Reigeluth & A. A. Carr-Chellman (Eds.), Instructional-design theories and models: Building a common knowledge base (Vol. III, pp. 41-56). New York: Routledge.

MONTESSORI, M. (1928). Antropología Pedagógica. Barcelona: Araluce

MONTESSORI, M. (1937). Método de la Pedagogía Científica. Barcelona: Araluce

MONTESSORI, M. (1935). Manual práctico del método. Barcelona: Araluce

Pérez-Paredes, P., & Zapata-Ros, M. (2018). El pensamiento computacional, análisis de una competencia clave. Scotts Valley, CA, USA: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform.

Reigeluth, C. M. (1999). What is instructional-design theory and how is it changing? In C. M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional-design theories and models: A new paradigm of instructional theory (Vol. II, pp. 5-29). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Reigeluth, C. M. (2016).  Teoría instruccional y tecnología para el nuevo paradigma de la educación. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia. Número 50. 30 de septiembre de 2016. Consultado el (dd/mm/aaa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/50

Sullivan, A., & Bers, M. U. (2015). Robotics in the early childhood classroom: Learning outcomes from an 8-week robotics curriculum in pre-kindergarten through second grade. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi:10.1007/s10798-015-9304-5.

Sullivan, A., & Bers, M. U. (2017). Dancing robots: integrating art, music, and robotics in Singapore’s early childhood centers. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 1-22.https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10798-017-9397-0

Thompson, D., & Bell, T. (2013, November). Adoption of new computer science high school standards by New Zealand teachers. In Proceedings of the 8th Workshop in Primary and Secondary Computing Education (pp. 87-90). ACM. https://itp.nz/files/wipsce-teachers-2013.pdf y https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2532759

Zapata-Ros, M. (2014). Coding y pre-coding. Blog Microposts, Tumblr http://miguelzapataros.tumblr.com/post/89143450350/coding-y-pre-coding

Zapata-Ros, M. (Noviembre 2014). ¿Por qué «pensamiento computacional»? (I)  Blog Pensamiento computacional y alfabetización digital / Computational thinking and computer literacy. http://computational-think.blogspot.com/2014/11/por-que-pensamiento-computacional-i.html

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED. Revista de educación a distancia, (46), 1-47. DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/red/46/4 

Zapata-Ros, M. (2018a). El pensamiento computacional en la transición entre culturas epistemológicas. Blog RED El aprendizaje en la Sociedad del Conocimiento. Consultado el (dd/mm/aaa) en https://red.hypotheses.org/1235

Zapata-Ros, M. (2018b). Pensamiento computacional. Una tercera competencia clave. (I) Blog RED El aprendizaje en la Sociedad del Conocimiento. Consultado el (dd/mm/aaa) en https://red.hypotheses.org/1059


[1] 

Este trabajo está bajo una licencia de Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0  Debe ser citado como:

Zapata-Ros, M. (2018) Pensamiento computacional desenchufado / Computational thinking unplugged. Blog RED de Hypotheses. El aprendizaje en la Sociedad del Conocimientohttps://red.hypotheses.org/1508

DOI : 10.13140/RG.2.2.12945.48481

 

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159). Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria. Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York. Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

What Kind of Innovations We Need in Education?

Klinge Orlando Villalba-Condori

Universidad Nacional de San Agustín de Arequipa, PERU

Francisco José García-Peñalvo

Full Professor, Computer Science Department, Research Institute for Educational Sciences, University of Salamanca, GRIAL Research Group

University of Salamanca, SPAIN

Jari Lavonen

Professor, Director of the National Teacher Education Reform Program

University of Helsinki, FINLAND

Miguel Zapata-Ros

University of Murcia, SPAIN

RED Editor

Member of the Interuniversity Institute of International Economics

ISSN 2386-8562

Este artículo está bajo una licencia de Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0

Debe ser citado como

Villalba-Condori, K. et al (2018) What Kind of Innovations We Need in Education?. Blog RED de Hypotheses. El aprendizaje en la Sociedad del Conocimiento.  https://red.hypotheses.org/1413

We are happy to contribute this prologue to the Proceedings of the International Congress on Educational Innovation Trends, CITIE 2018. The congress has created an enthusiastic environment within which scholars may discuss educational innovations and their nature. A very positive attitude dominated the discussions, and individuals were asking: ‘Can we make things better?’ In this type of discussion, it is important that we know the challenges in our education context as well as the processes that are appropriate to follow in the transfer or implementation of these innovations to our own context.

In all countries, challenges in education have been discussed in several forums, conferences, and national-level curriculum committees. The challenges may be recognised on the basis of international comparative studies, such as OECD, PISA (OECD, 2013), and TALIS (OECD, 2014) surveys, and national-level monitoring reports. Moreover, it is important that education challenges be analysed from the society’s perspective, including changes in working life, gender gaps, and the environment (e.g., climate change). These recognised challenges may be summarised in different ways and at different levels.

The challenges may be classified, for example, at the student level, classroom level, school level, municipality level, and thus, the society level. In most countries, politicians and teachers are not happy with the level of learning outcomes and the amount of variation in those outcomes; the variation in learning outcomes between schools is namely considered an indication of inequality in the education system. Another common student-level challenge is the lack of engagement (interest) in learning and, more generally, the lack of mental well-being. The lack of students’ interest in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) studies and careers (Ramírez-Montoya, 2017) have been specifically considered a serious challenge for both the individual and society.

There have been discussions in many countries about the teaching and learning of 21st-century and/or generic competencies (Ananiadou & Claro, 2009). The learning of these competencies represents a classroom-level challenge and refers to the redefinition of educational goals and ways of organising learning in a classroom in order to meet the future’s demands. These competencies have been defined in various ways (e.g., see an analysis of Voogt & Roblin, 2012). The OECD (2005) DeSeCo project analysed 21st-century competences in the context of the future working life and recognised that individuals need to be able to use a wide range of tools, including socio-cultural (language) and digital (technological) tools, to interact effectively with the environment, to engage and interact in a heterogeneous group, to engage in inquiry-oriented working and problem solving, and, moreover, to act autonomously and take responsibility for managing their own lives. In this context, as well as in the working context, critical and creative thinking and learning are necessary for one to learn competencies. Although DeSeCo focuses on the needs of working life, its ideas may be interpreted in the context of school. By this interpretation, it is important to remember that students are novices and are still learning these competencies. Consequently, the teacher should support the students in the learning of 21st-century competencies through active and collaborative learning processes in the diverse learning environments. Another classroom-level challenge is the support of individual learners’ and the organisation of a heterogeneous and multicultural classroom that supports the learning processes of various learners.

At the school and city levels, there exist challenges in the planning of the local curriculum or annual work plan and within the physical and digital learning environments of teams of teachers and teacher networks. In order to overcome this type of challenge, high-quality pedagogical leadership is needed to support teachers’ collaboration and professional development.

At a society level, artificial intelligence and robotization are changing working life; tasks or work responsibilities and roles disappear and change and, moreover, new tasks and roles appear about which we do not yet know. Computational thinking (CT) skills (Wing, 2006; Zapata-Ros, 2015; García-Peñalvo & Mendes, 2018) have been determined a key competency for pre-university students (Mohaghegh & McCauley, 2016; Pérez-Paredes & Zapata-Ros, 2018). However, due the fuzzy definition of CT (García-Peñalvo, Reimann, Tuul, Rees, & Jormanainen, 2016), many voices defend a most pragmatical approach based on teaching coding (DePryck, 2016), using robots (Curto & Moreno, 2016; Fernández-Llamas, Conde-González, Rodríguez-Lera, Rodríguez-Sedano, & García-Peñalvo, 2018; Reimann & Maday, 2017) or constructing things (Reimann & Maday, 2017; García-Peñalvo et al., 2018) (e.g., see the EU project TACCLE 3 – Coding outcomes, in García-Peñalvo, 2016; TACCLE 3 Consortium, 2017). Moreover, there are proposals advocating to include programming (Balanskat & Engelhardt, 2015) or computer science subjects (Velázquez-Iturbide, 2018; Velázquez-Iturbide et al., 2018) in the pre-university official curricula. The CT and/or computer science/programming introduction in schools has a significant, related challenge in these contexts: the training of kindergarten to high school pre-university teachers (Yadav, Gretter, Good, & McLean, 2017; Villalba-Condori, 2018; Villalba-Condori, Castro Cuba-Sayco, Guillen Chávez, Deco, & Bender, 2018).

Another example of a society-level challenge, which is related to changes in working life and employability (Michavila, Martínez, Martín-González, García-Peñalvo, & Cruz-Benito, 2016, 2018a, 2018b), is the number of young people who drop out from both education and the labour market. Furthermore, there is a need to continuously train adults in order to reflect the changes in working life, such as digitalisation.

In order to make progress and overcome the recognised challenges, national-level reform programs are needed. However, the designing and implementing of a national reform program are challenging processes. For example, Beach, Bagley, Eriksson, and Player-Koro (2014) recognised, based on their long-term policy analysis from Sweden, that Swedish reforms are too strongly led by governments alone: ‘governments too often become tempted to allow their ideological interests to predominate over scientific knowledge’ (p. 167). Moreover, it is common that the aims of the reform program do not consider the research outcomes in the field. OECD (Burns & Köster, 2016) have suggested that, in a national strategy context, certain characteristics are important. However, the OECD list does not include research orientation in planning and implementation, nor does it include continuous quality assurance (QA)—meaning, for example, a collection of progress data from the pilot projects and informing of the pilot projects. Moreover, collaboration and meetings that support pilot projects communicate the pilots’ outcomes to other pilots and reflect on the missing outcomes. An updated OECD list explains the requirements for making progress and overcoming the recognised challenges at the national level:

  • Have enough time for planning, careful timing, and implementation;
  • Engage stakeholders, such as education providers, and employ organisations participate the strategy design;
  • Engage researchers to actively implement the research-based knowledge in the strategy design;
  • Be in partnership with the teacher union and employment union;
  • Strive for consensus in the design;
  • Serve sustainable resources for the planning and implementation of the strategy;
  • Plan pilot projects according to the strategy and take research-based knowledge into account while planning and implementing the pilots, learning from the pilots, modifying the strategic aims (if needed), and, moreover, using pilots to implement the strategy. Researchers should encourage pilots to participate and use sustainable resources in thereof;
  • Disseminate the pilots’ outcomes.

This kind of approach for the implementation of educational reforms has many benefits in both the strategy design and implementation. The approach makes it possible for reforms to be accepted and implemented. The stakeholder engagement namely increases their ownership and assists with implementation. Also, it is essential that criteria and ideas be reflected upon and considered during the implementation of educational practices. We plan to do so for the purpose of increasing learning efficiency and the involved actors’ and institutions’ satisfaction through personalization and adaptability (Berlanga & García-Peñalvo, 2008) (Zapata-Ros, 2018), which are the most important characteristics and objectives of the learning environments and are supported by not only social and ubiquitous technologies, but also detection and recommendation.

We need a response to an indisputable fact: the use of smart technologies (Molina-Carmona & Villagrá-Arnedo, 2018) as a powerful means to adapt and include support in the delivery of help and resources in a relevant and pertinent way to the personal (Lerís & Sein-Echaluce, 2011) and group learning (Conde-González, Colomo-Palacios, García-Peñalvo, & Larrueca, 2018) situations as well as the demand of students’ knowledge and skills.

There is a need for a pedagogical model framework, instructional design, and guides that integrate students and help reach common and desirable learning outcomes. We also raise the need to analyse the necessary conditions regarding their validation. Finally, we propose the need for concrete answers to the insufficiency and resulting consequences of institutional policies that contemplate integration modalities, which may be achieved through an analysis based on experiences.

We are accustomed to literature that emphasizes the possibilities of an adaptive education as well as the possibilities for big data—combined with algorithms—to create unique and unprecedented opportunities for academic organizations to teach higher standards and innovative approaches. However, there is currently a lack of systematized pedagogical proposals.

Ultimately, we propose to enhance the following lines of development (Zapata-Ros, 2018):

  • Learning and teaching strategies for a ubiquitous social and intelligent pedagogy (Fidalgo-Blanco, Sein-Echaluce, & García-Peñalvo, 2018);
  • Highly technological and singular services supported by technological ecosystems (Llorens-Largo, Molina-Carmona, Compañ, & Satorre, 2014; García-Peñalvo, 2018; García-Holgado & García-Peñalvo, 2019), both for local students on campus and remote students online, to create learning ecologies within which knowledge may be created, managed, transformed, and transferred (Rubio Royo, Cranfield McKay, Nelson-Santana, Delgado Rodríguez, & Occon-Carreras, 2018);
  • Configurations of innovative, adaptive classrooms and centres that facilitate easy local/remote interactions among students and teachers;
  • Design and development of multimedia-enriched contents with interactive presentations, videoconferences, questionnaires, and assessments that allow instant and individualized evaluation;
  • Other affordances and managed environments with technology and adaptive software;
  • An ethical use of the learning and academic analytics to increase the support given to students and academic managers in regard to their learning processes and decision-making processes, respectively (Ferguson, 2012; Conde-González & Hernández-García, 2015);
  • A more natural incorporation, recognition, and mixture of the informal learning processes into formal education (Griffiths & García-Peñalvo, 2016).

As we mentioned earlier, we have learned about various education innovations from several countries during the CITIE 2018. Now, our duty is to analyse how we can benefit from those innovations within our own educational context. Therefore, we should analyse our education challenges and then modify the innovation to meet our local needs according to the recognized challenges. Moreover, it is important that we find proper ways to support the transfer of innovation. In general, the transfer of educational innovation from one context to another has been considered challenging. Successful transfer requires strong collaboration and development within an open and trusting atmosphere depending on the local characteristics of the context. In the area of education, local characteristics include teachers’ pedagogical orientation, their teaching and learning beliefs, and the leadership and support available to them in school. Moreover, the educational context of the country (e.g., a curriculum, level of accountability, policy, and school inspection) influence teachers’ decisions as they consider adopting the innovation. Consequently, the transfer of an educational innovation is regarded as a complex and highly contextualized task.

References

Ananiadou, K., & Claro, M. (2009). 21st century skills and competences for new millennium learners in OECD Countries. OECD Education Working Papers, 41.

Berlanga, A. J., & García-Peñalvo, F. J. (2008). Learning design in adaptive educational hypermedia systems. Journal of Universal Computer Science, 14(22), 3627–3647. doi:10.3217/jucs-014-22-3627

Balanskat, A., & Engelhardt, K. (2015). Computing our future. Computer programming and coding priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe. Brussels, Belgium: European Schoolnet.

Burns, T., & Köster, F. (Eds.) (2016). Governing education in a complex world. Paris: OECD Publishing. doi:10.1787/9789264255364-en

Beach, D., Bagley, C., Eriksson, A. & Player-Koro, C. (2016). Changing teacher education in Sweden: Using meta-ethnographic analysis to understand and describe policy making and educational changes. Teaching and Teacher Education, 44, 160–167.

Conde-González, M. Á., Colomo-Palacios, R., García-Peñalvo, F. J., & Larrueca, X. (2018). Teamwork assessment in the educational web of data: A learning analytics approach towards ISO 10018. Telematics and Informatics, 35(3), 551–563. doi:10.1016/j.tele.2017.02.001

Conde-González, M. Á., & Hernández-García, Á. (2015). Learning analytics for educational decision making. Computers in Human Behavior, 47, 1–3. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2014.12.03

Curto, B., & Moreno, V. (2016). Robotics in education. Journal of Intelligent and Robotic Systems, 81(1), 3–4. doi:10.1007/s10846-015-0314-z

DePryck, K. (2016). From computational thinking to coding and back. In F. J. García-Peñalvo (Ed.), Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Technological Ecosystems for Enhancing Multiculturality (TEEM’16) (Salamanca, Spain, November 24, 2016) (pp. 27–29). New York, NY, USA: ACM. doi:10.1145/3012430.3012492

Ferguson, R. (2012). Learning analytics: Drivers, developments and challenges. International Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 4(5/6), 304–317. doi:10.1504/IJTEL.2012.051816

Fernández-Llamas, C., Conde-González, M. Á., Rodríguez-Lera, F. J., Rodríguez-Sedano, F. J., & García-Peñalvo, F. J. (2018). May I teach you? Students’ behavior when lectured by robotic vs. human teachers. Computers in Human Behavior, 80, 460–469. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2017.09.028.

Fidalgo-Blanco, Á., Sein-Echaluce, M. L., & García-Peñalvo, F. J. (2018). Micro flip teaching with collective intelligence. In P. Zaphiris & A. Ioannou (Eds.), Learning and collaboration technologies. Design, development and technological innovation. 5th International Conference, LCT 2018, held as part of HCI International 2018, Las Vegas, NV, USA, July 1520, 2018, Proceedings, Part I (pp. 400–415). Cham, Switzerland: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-91743-6_30

García-Holgado, A., & García-Peñalvo, F. J. (2019). Validation of the learning ecosystem metamodel using transformation rules. Future Generation Computer Systems, 91, 300–310. doi:10.1016/j.future.2018.09.011

García-Peñalvo, F. J. (2016). A brief introduction to TACCLE 3 – coding European project. In F. J. García-Peñalvo & J. A. Mendes (Eds.), 2016 International Symposium on Computers in Education (SIIE 16). USA: IEEE. doi:10.1109/SIIE.2016.7751876

García-Peñalvo, F. J. (2018). Ecosistemas tecnológicos universitarios. In J. Gómez (Ed.), UNIVERSITIC 2017. Análisis de las TIC en las Universidades Españolas (pp. 164–170). Madrid, España: Crue Universidades Españolas.

García-Peñalvo, F. J., & Mendes, J. A. (2018). Exploring the computational thinking effects in pre-university education. Computers in Human Behavior, 80, 407–411. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2017.12.005

García-Peñalvo, F. J., Reimann, D., & Maday, C. (2018). Introducing coding and computational thinking in the schools: The TACCLE 3 – coding project experience. In M. S. Khine (Ed.), Computational thinking in the STEM disciplines. Foundations and research highlights (pp. 213–226). Cham, Switzerland: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-93566-9_11

García-Peñalvo, F. J., Reimann, D., Tuul, M., Rees, A., & Jormanainen, I. (2016). An overview of the most relevant literature on coding and computational thinking with emphasis on the relevant issues for teachers. Belgium: TACCLE3. doi:10.5281/zenodo.165123

Griffiths, D., & García-Peñalvo, F. J. (2016). Informal learning recognition and management. Computers in Human Behavior, 55A, 501–503. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.10.019

Lerís, D., & Sein-Echaluce, M. L. (2011). La personalización del aprendizaje: Un objetivo del paradigma educativo centrado en el aprendizaje. Arbor, 187 (Extra_3), 123–134. doi:doi:10.3989/arbor.2011.Extra-3n3135

Llorens-Largo, F., Molina-Carmona, R., Compañ, P., & Satorre, R. (2014). Technological ecosystem for open education. In R. Neves-Silva, G. A. Tsihrintzis, V. Uskov, R. J. Howlett, & L. C. Jain (Eds.), Smart digital futures 2014. (pp. 706–715). Amsterdam, The Netherlands: IOS Press.

Michavila, F., Martínez, J. M., Martín-González, M., García-Peñalvo, F. J., & Cruz-Benito, J. (2016). Barómetro de empleabilidad y empleo de los universitarios en España, 2015 (Primer informe de resultados). Madrid: Observatorio de Empleabilidad y Empleo Universitarios.

Michavila, F., Martínez, J. M., Martín-González, M., García-Peñalvo, F. J., & Cruz Benito, J. (2018a). Empleabilidad de los titulados universitarios en España. Proyecto OEEU. Education in the Knowledge Society, 19(1), 21–39. doi:10.14201/eks20181912139

Michavila, F., Martínez, J. M., Martín-González, M., García-Peñalvo, F. J., Cruz-Benito, J., & Vázquez-Ingelmo, A. (2018b). Barómetro de empleabilidad y empleo universitarios. Edición Máster 2017. Madrid, España: Observatorio de Empleabilidad y Empleo Universitarios.

Mohaghegh, M., & McCauley, M. (2016). Computational thinking: The skill set of the 21st century. International Journal of Computer Science and Information Technologies, 7(3), 1524–1530.

Molina-Carmona, R., & Villagrá-Arnedo, C. J. (2018). Smart learning. In F. J. García-Peñalvo (Ed.), Proceedings TEEM’18. Sixth International Conference on Technological Ecosystems for Enhancing Multiculturality (Salamanca, Spain, October 2426, 2018) (pp. 645–647). New York, NY, USA: ACM. doi:10.1145/3284179.3284288

OECD. (2005). Definition and selection of competencies (DeSeCo): Executive summary. Paris: OECD Publishing.

OECD. (2013). PISA 2012. Results in focus. What 15-year-olds know and what they can do with what they know. Paris: OECD.

OECD. (2014). Talis 2013 Results: An international perspective on teaching and learning. Paris: OECD Publishing.

Pérez-Paredes, P., & Zapata-Ros, M. (2018). El pensamiento computacional, análisis de una competencia clave. Scotts Valley, CA, USA: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform.

Ramírez-Montoya, M. S. (Ed.) (2017). Handbook of research on driving STEM learning with educational technologies. Hershey PA, USA: IGI Global.

Reimann, D., & Maday, C. (2017). Enseñanza y aprendizaje del modelado computacional en procesos creativos y contextos estéticos. Education in the Knowledge Society, 18(3), 87–97. doi:10.14201/eks20171838797

Rubio Royo, E., Cranfield McKay, S., Nelson-Santana, J. C., Delgado Rodríguez, R. N., & Occon-Carreras, A. A. (2018). Web knowledge turbine as a proposal for personal and professional self-organisation in complex times. Journal of Information Technology Research, 11(1), 70–90. doi:10.4018/JITR.2018010105

TACCLE 3 Consortium. (2017). TACCLE 3: Coding Erasmus + project website. Retrieved from https://goo.gl/f4QZUA

Velázquez-Iturbide, J. Á. (2018). Report of the Spanish computing scientific society on computing education in pre-university stages. In F. J. García-Peñalvo (Ed.), Proceedings TEEM’18. Sixth International Conference on Technological Ecosystems for Enhancing Multiculturality (Salamanca, Spain, October 2426, 2018) (pp. 2–7). New York, NY, USA: ACM. doi:10.1145/3284179.3284180

Velázquez-Iturbide, J. Á., Bahamonde, A., Dabic, S., Escalona, M. J., Feito, F., Fernández Cabaleiro, S., . . . & Zapata Ros, M. (2018). Informe del grupo de trabajo SCIE/CODDII sobre la enseñanza preuniversitaria de la informática. España: Sociedad Científica Informática de España, Conferencia de Decanos y Directores de Ingeniería Informática.

Villalba-Condori, K. O. (2018). Teaching formation to develop computational thinking. In F. J. García-Peñalvo (Ed.), Global implications of emerging technology trends (pp. 59–72). Hershey, PA, USA: IGI Global. doi:10.4018/978-1-5225-4944-4.ch004

Villalba-Condori, K. O., Castro Cuba-Sayco, S. E., Guillen Chávez, E. P., Deco, C., & Bender, C. (2018). Approaches of learning and computational thinking in students that get into the computer sciences career. In F. J. García-Peñalvo (Ed.), Proceedings TEEM’18. Sixth International Conference on Technological Ecosystems for Enhancing Multiculturality (Salamanca, Spain, October 2426, 2018) (pp. 36–40). New York, NY, USA: ACM. doi:10.1145/3284179.3284185

Voogt, J. & Roblin, N.P. (2012). A comparative analysis of international frameworks for 21st century competences: Implications for national curriculum policies. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 44(3), 299–321. doi:10.1080/00220272.2012.668938

Wing, J. M. (2006). Computational thinking. Communications of the ACM, 49(3), 33–35. doi:10.1145/1118178.1118215

Yadav, A., Gretter, S., Good, J., & McLean, T. (2017). Computational thinking in teacher education. In P. J. Rich & C. B. Hodges (Eds.), Emerging research, practice, and policy on computational thinking (pp. 205–220). Cham, Switzerland: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-52691-1_13

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED, Revista de Educación a distancia, 46.

Zapata-Ros, M. (2018). La universidad inteligente. La transición de los LMS a los sistemas inteligentes de aprendizaje en educación superior. RED, Revista de Educación a distancia, 57(10). doi:10.6018/red/57/10

Miguel Zapata Ros

Profesor Honorario en el Centro de Formación y Desarrollo Profesional de la Universidad de Murcia. Investigador en el Instituto Interuniversitario de Economía Internacional. Profesor Externo en la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, miembro del programas de doctorado en Ingeniería de la Información y del Conocimiento, distinguido con Mención hacia la Excelencia por el Ministerio de Educación (Referencia: MEE2011-0159).
Editor de RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia y de Docencia Universitaria.
Miembro de INTCODE, agencia consultiva de ONU sobre educación a distancia, y representante en la sede de New York.
Doctor en Ingeniería Informática.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus