How does Digitalisation Affect the Universities?

Dr. Wolfram Laaser

Former “Akademischer Direktor“

FernUniversität in Hagen

Germany

 

This work is the preprint of an article in issue number 57 of RED

Este trabajo es el preprint de un artículo en el número 57 de RED.

 

Abstract

At present a substantial insecurity prevails about the future of eLearning and particularly about the future of recent MOOCs. Those who have been enthusiastic at the beginning are now more esceptical about the future development of teaching with digital media, others maintain their positive attitude and look for ways to promote and implement their use in the university. Numerous institutions publish forecasts and time frames about relevance of the upcomong innovations. We took the critique raised against the methodological background of some studies as a point of departure to discuss the possible impact of digitalization  on a future digital university from a historical and economic perspective. It shows that digitalization followed a  continuous development especially pushed by  distance education universities and that phenomena such as MOOCs turned out to be  not as “disruptive” as some providers pretend. Instead  national policies, economic sustainability and the impact of digitalization on different stakeholders will determine the future shape of the “digital University”.

 

Introduction:  Chrystal gazing about future innovations in educational technology

 

These days forecasting of future implementations of teaching and learning technologies and the related concepts is very much “en vogue”. The Horizon Reports (NMC, 2017), the Innovation Reports of the British OU (Sharples et al. 2016) or the Gartner Cycles (Gartner, 2016) are prominent examples. A very recent one is from a blog and shows the 9 top eLearning Trends in 2017.

Fig. 1: ELearning Trends of 2017 (Jones,  2017)

 

The problem is that the technological development is fast and underlying varying economic and political influences. Therefore, the reliability and validity of such attempts is not easy to be achieved. Most of the studies are based on simple questionnaires filled in by educational stakeholders or “so called experts”. Unspecific terms are used in the description of the innovations such as “grassroots video” (see also critical points raised by Baggaley, 2016) or are overlapping such as “Adaptive Learning “and “Artificial Intelligence”, probably chosen to avoid some future criticism, after time has passed and the forecasts turned out to be wrong (see also the critique of Baggaley (2016) and Watters (2017). Therefore, it seems to be extremely risky to sketch the “Digital University of the Future”, without taking into account the history of the university and its cultural and technological development.  However, the option that the university as such might even disappear some time ahead can not completely be excluded (Bates, 2014).

 

We will not add another forecast. There is a sufficient number already in the market. Instead we will discuss some aspects of past and present development that may be relevant for the future development of digital media in Higher Education. So firstly, we will look back and relate the findings and experience with digitization experienced up  to the present state of the art. We will furthermore focus mainly on a small subsystem, the pubic universities and discuss different views and options that will impact on the future “digital university”, assuming, that something like a digitalized university may then exist.

 

Historical flash back from Distance Education to Blended Learning

Traditionally lectures at the classical university used face to face lectures with chalk and blackboard supplemented by textbooks and reading assignments. This changed after the Second World War. Media played an increasing role to satisfy the high demand for continuous adult education which the conventional universities could not provide at short term. This was the time when distance teaching universities entered the scene, first in Europe Canada and the United The printed modules remained the core medium used. Many Distance Education Universities soon became Mega Universities due to massive enrollment.

The Distance Education Universities have been among the first to apply digitalization  to development and distribution of educational content. For example the German Distance Teaching University of Hagen started already in the early 1980ies experimenting with text processing and computer conferencing. Later didactic computer simulations, online courses and virtual laboratories have been developed. Digitalization allowed for a very close integration of the different media. Pushed by the developing internet, digital media such as pdf files, podcasts or webcasts etc. have been added and integrated into complex learning management systems that provided also web spaces for simultaneous or delayed communication.

 

The media development in distance education and the potential of the world wide web forced the conventional universities to keep up with the rapid development and to make greater use of the new facilities for teaching and learning. With regard to the learning management system developed to integrate teching and administrative  task it turned out that these systems initially were isolated from each other. Put together, learning management systems and integration of smooth data linkage with administrative processes such as matriculation, certification, lecture schedules, costing led to the complete campus management systems that are introduced today. This development is still ongoing and has a great potential for future development (Shacklock, 2016).

 

Since the end of the 90ies production and distribution of teaching content could be provided at very low cost via learning and campus management systems, conferencing facilities and network services.  So, conventional universities could adjust their teaching model to integrate off campus learning and teaching activities into their programs. The outcome is for most universities at present a mixed mode system labelled “Blended Learning” which includes recordings of online lecturing activities, mediated self study, group work and face to face activities. At present the mix of these system components vary across universities and even between departments or chairs. The term “Blended Learning” though, is another example of a buzzword which practically does not exclude any specific teaching mode. Offline learning by reading a book at home before attending a classroom lecture is in a broad sense a representation of blended learning as well.  Concluding we can state, that the innovation called “distance education” finally trickled down to some extent to the entire educational sector and is going to dissolve itself as a specific teaching model.

Some Economics of the “Digital University”

Distance education had since its early years already applied a type of industrialized pattern of development, production and distribution, which included course development teams, modular teaching units and professional management and organization. The digitization and the web changed the cost structure step by step as well for the conventional universities turning from investment in “Brick and Mortar” to investment in content, IT and training of staff. The inexpensive or free digital web tools allowed for a more decentralized mode of production and distribution of digitized media. The communication technology changed from “one to many” to a “networked community” with different clusters which include also social networks outside the university.

Some Economics

Wagner (1972) showed that the cost per student at the British Open University, the famous distance teaching university, is about one third of the other conventional British universities.

 

Fig. 3: Cost of F2F and Distance education (According to Wagner, 1972)

Symbols used :

TC = Total Cost;  F2F = Face to Face;  DE = Distance Education N = Number of Students

 

From the diagram it can be observed, that there exists an enrollment level where distance education becomes cheaper than face to face education. Whether distance learning can really be sketched like shown in the diagram is debatable, because also output quality and other factors might be relevant for the comparison. In any case, what is presented by Wagner is not equally valid for todays blended scenarios.

The introduction of phases of self-study by recording of lectures or other digital material (flipped classroom model) needs training of teachers, the acquisition and updating of software and probably permanent technical support services for teachers and students.  These costs can be balanced against some cost reduction for lecture halls and other local assets. Though, the lecture halls for types of blended learning must be especially equipped with good recording facilities and some location for final editing has to be provided if this can not be done by the teacher himself.

Blended learning is at present the predominant style of teaching and learning. One of the general problems of blended learning, as a mixture of face to face meetings with phases of autonomous learning with digital media, is the pacing of individual learner progress considering very heterogeneous learner experiences. This holds especially for the Massive Open Online Courses when offered without any restriction of access and free of charge. The coordination especially with respect to f2f meetings is difficult and  time consuming for both teachers and learners. Individualization needs free timing of your own activities, which can conflict with obligations with respect to collaborative learning or f2f events. Thus, a system which concentrates heavily on network based instruction without face to face meetings but with some delayed and simultaneous support feed back by conferencing or fora maybe still an economically attractive alternative. The relatively strict mix of online and offline phases will not achieve comparable cost reduction as those known from the former distance education systems.

Fig.4: Total Cost of a Blended Scenario

Due to regular phases of self study an increase in student numbers will require less additional lecturing hours than in a fully F2F teaching model. So, some workload is transferred to the students. However, a jump of fixed costs will happen from time to time for the additional cost of expanding the number of lecture halls and updating the recording and editing facilities once the capacity limit is reached. Furthermore, there are still some variable cost such as operational cost of the platform or software updates.  Therfore there is a certain trade off between scalability, educational quality and the share of simultaneous communication. Every type of fixed schedules for simultaneous communication, be it electronically or face to face, is hampering the full exploitation of economies of scale (Laaser, 2008).

 

The “disruptive evolution” of MOOCs – Are they sustainable?

To illustrate the arguments above we will look at the actual debate about MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses).  MOOCs seemed to be a low-cost alternative to conventional lectures and a strategy to enter global markets. The massively enrolled students in the first xMOOCs (MOOCs offered by leading US universities) were not supported by tutors or lecturers. They received streamed or downloadable video lectures and some multiple-choice tests. Initially the development and running of MOOCs have been funded by large grants in the US to offer the programs free of charge. But after funding cuts the universities had to look for other sources of financing. If there is no special permanent budget for MOOCs allocated, the activity has to generate some own revenue to cover the development cost of new courses and pay some amount for the platform operation. However, with increasing enrollment and increasing heterogeneity of participants the necessity to offer more specific support services such as online or f2f tutorials will increase and in case that they are not provided will lead to high drop out rates. So, MOOCs either will loose one of their constitutive attributes – being free of charge – or they will be restricted without special funding to offer a limited number of short “low service quality” courses with high enrollment numbers and high drop out rates, hoping to be compensated by some image gain that may lead to new enrollments in other courses. Udacity and  Coursera already gave up  their policy to offer certificates or tutorials completely for free.

Thus, the xMOOC concept is in a dilemma situation, either to deliver low service quality and high drop out or charging at least for some  running cost such as platform operating, tutorials  or certificates. In this case the number of students will be more limited and the xMooc-type of courses turns out finally to be just  a regular offer that is only independent of having a respective entrance qualification and of being a student of the university. As expressed by a report of Siemens “The sheer scale of numbers of students led to bold proclamations of education disruption and a sector on the verge of systemic change. However, from the perspective of 2015 , these statements appear increasingly erroneous as Moocs have proven to be simply an additional opportunity instead of a direct challenge to higher education itself” (Siemens et al. 2015, p. 6).

The MOOC programs represent a marketing strategy by which some of the university’s teaching content is provided for free as an appetizer but soon after the institutions will  look for business models to cover the substantial expenses (see also Laaser, 2014). Though it may be fascinating to think about the accessability of internet screencasts or classroom lecture  recordings for free which  can be viewed at real time or later by an nearly unlimited number of students from a webpage at minimal  costs or for free as the marginal cost for distributing  an additional lecture copy tends to be zero for the institution. The old economies of scale seem to re-appear to a certain extent. Though, even if marginal cost are zero, the fixed costs – or after investment also called “sunk cost” –  in terms of recording facilities, teacher training and time for preparation of the lecture as well as initial expenses for the platform development will remain a substantial cost driver for further programs.

 

In economics, a situation where the costs of production per unit of output (students taught) is mainly dominated by the fixed initial investment cost and is characterized by very low or zero distribution cost has an inherent tendency to lead to a “natural monopoly”.

 

Fig.5: Marginal and average total cost of software (according to Shy (2001)

Each output unit is generated by lower average cost.  Prices(P) can not be determined anymore by marginal cost (MC) in a way as they are determined in an ideal competitive market because the competition  would lead to permanent losses. Therefore, these markets need either government control or suppliers can make excessive profits. At price P0 and enrollment N0 the profit is zero because the price equals average total cost, as it prevails in non profit public institutions,  but profit increases if N > N0 while maintaining the price level.

Fig.6: Enrollment, average total cost and quality                   

Let us come back to the case of a  natural monopoly for a public good. You can see from the graph, that if the state sets the price at P0 for a public  company to cover at least its costs           (P0 ∙N0)  at output  N 0 , average costs equal the price for a given small amount of variable cost that is needed for the basic level of quality to serve the students.  If the price remains fixed a further  extension of the production up to N1 , net profits will be made. But the higher enrollment can lead to a lower quality of the course. To maintain a profit of zero with the price kept unchanged the quality has to be increased, which could be done by more tutorials or increased operational cost of the platform. The cost curve shifts to the right until profits equal the average total cost.  The quality level is now Q1 .

If students´ fees are zero then the production will be increased until the demand of students is completely satisfied. If the fees rise for the students, their contribution lowers the public subsidies necessary assuming that the price does´t change. Probably the willingness of students to pay for higher additional services (quality) will not be linear or progressive but will drop at some point.

Any newcomer has to invest in the developed technology before offering his product whereas the already existing companies are able at least temporarily to offer their product at marginal cost in order to kick newcomers out of the market, as their investment is already made and thus, considered as sunk cost.

As the production cost of online teaching content declined, e.g. video recording and editing can already be done just using a smartphone and then be uploaded to a free server space on the web, any educational software monopoly or oligopoly has to count with entrance of new competitors, as the cost of market entrance is lower. As a strategy to defend its strong position in the market upcoming new start-ups are simply bought up by the companies that are already in the market. Furthermore, the ruling companies take an enormous effort to defend or extend their market share by huge expenses for marketing using data analysis for targeting precisely the potential customer. So, smaller firms are much less visible to the customer.

A comparable tendency towards  high  market concentration can be  observed in digital academic publishing, where a similar cost structure prevails. According to Larivière et al.  (2015) since the advent of the digital era of the mid 1990s the leading publishers increased their share of scientific output published. In 2013 about 70 % of the papers published in social sciences are  from the top five publishers.

Several universities in the U.S. use a common platform for distribution of their xMOOCs like Udacity  or Coursera to reduce development and operating cost of MOOCs (for economies of scope see Li  et al. (2012) . However, it is already visible that at least in Europe there will be not one common “European MOOC platform” and probably not even a single national platform – as announced by the Norwegian Ministries –   because development of such a platform is not very expensive – e.g. they can created also with moodle –  and can be better tailored to the needs of smaller and more homogeneous institutional groups (Creelman, 2014), (Cooch et al.,  2015).

Nevertheless, the pressure of rising expenses for education onto public budgets to cope with salary increases to rise with corresponding increases in the private sector is not yet solved. The consequence will be, that the cost intensive parts like tutoring will be replaced to a

greater extent by robots or bots. To substitute lecturing time and evaluation by student’s peer collaboration and evaluation is not a convincing and efficient solution, because the time, students will need to organize  meaningful learning for themselves might enlarge study time and thus,  lead to a longer graduation period, which would be  costly as well  for the economy. It is furthermore, in the light of the past experience with applications  of artificial intelligence, insecure, up to which degree the human dialogue can be substituted in Higher Education by non-human machines, as Higher Education is  a segment of the educational sector, where repetitive processes or dialogues are less frequent and where the look, tone of voice, corporal expression etc. are important to establish a good rapport.

At first sight it would be reasonable to standardize somehow the MOOCs according to different criteria and thereby create a more transparent educational market that allows for mutual accreditation of the partners. Then, negotiations can help a university to round up their curriculum by adding special parts that would be too expensive to be produced by themselves.

In the U.S. so far there is not yet much standardization visible and no common credit point system existent. The American educational system of Higher Education is characterized to a great extent  by private universities and foundations. So, the former free of charge MOOCs offered by some prestigious universities had to create after initial funding own income by certification, even selling of student data to other institutions or charging for tutorial support.

In contrast to the US, Europe has already made some progress in standardization and accreditation of careers with the ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) classification. Furthermore the share of public universities is much bigger than in the U.S..However, the problem has been in the past, that cooperation between universities still is very deficient across national borders because of existing social, cultural and legal differences. Therefore, the market is still not sufficiently developed. Furthermore, an early standardization or regulation can hamper innovations.

Futurists like Jeremy Rifkin (Rifkin, 2016) claim that the low cost of educational media, distributed nearly at marginal cost will challenge the existing monopoly of knowledge that the traditional university still represents. The (public) university is a service provider that will be replaced increasingly by individual access to teaching content at zero cost which can also be created, shared and evaluated in collaboration with the peers.

The hope,  expressed by Rifkin and others,  that the capitalist market economy will be transformed into a society where collaborative commons and sharing of self produced goods and services are dominating seems to be still unrealistic both from a viewpoint of the dynamics of a market economy and by taking the actual distribution of economic power into account. It seems rather that the public educational sector will become more dependent on the policy of the huge international companies.

Which are the more specific effects of digitization, networks and IT on the university? We will discuss this by differing the impact according to the stakeholders of the university, namely the external ones, such as ministries of education and industry and the internal ones, as there are the central leaders (Rector, CEO etc.), the administrative staff, the teachers and the students.

 

The Impact of Digitization on the Stakeholders

Students

Students are supposed to become digital literates, able to identify and use the resources of the web, learn to create content and to communicate and cooperate via the web. They will be able to check the correctness and credibility of web information and they will make creative use of the new options for ubiquitous learning. If these objectives are already pursued during school education, we might then get a much more autonomous learner to acquire the competences the European Community excels (see e.g. Williams, Kear & Rosewell, 2012).

 

However, what will be the “dark side” for this changed ecology? Social cohesion and interaction of students with their direct social environment will be less and in part be substituted by virtual identities of peers that may deviate from their real identity. Presentation in social networks can be a sign of a narcist culture. Students will sympathize or not with persons they know only by their virtual identity. This opens-up a big potential for seduction and distribution of hidden or faked information and ideologies (World Economic Forum 2016, p. 31).

 

Furthermore, they will be more distracted by reading from screen as the information they usually receive is diverse in design, sources and context. So, they might have some difficulties to concentrate on a problem for a longer period. Brabazon describes the problem that way:

“As each semester progresses, a greater proportion a greater proportion of my students are reading less, referencing less and writing with less boldness. There will be always the top 25 % oft he class who are rigorous and committed scholars in the making. They can operate in the models of student-centered learning. Increasingly the middle fifty per cent, who require greater guidance, attention and commitment from the teaching staff to pass a course, is producing inadequate stuff……These problems are not caused by Goggle. Instead, the popularity of Google is facilitating laziness, poor scholarship and compliant thinking” (Brabazon, 2014, chapter 1, p. 1). Morgan cites another interesting aspect referring to Hassan, which is the intensification of time expressed by the label “network time”.

“The more we inhabit the network – on a PC at work or at home, on a PDA on the train, or in the street with a mobile phone clamped to the ear – the more we inhabit its temporally accelerated domain, with its potentially disorienting and frenetic pace” (Hassan, 2004 p.28).

According to Hassan, network time leads to chronic distraction. Students will face an academic environment where social objectives and academic scholarship are, inter-twinned with an increasing extent of commercial influences, be it at school, home or workplace, especially if we look at social networks.

.

Fig. 6: Social ecology of networks and institutions

Teachers

In the digital university world university teachers are supposed to become facilitators, media experts and actors in front of a camera, knowledgeable users of web 2.0 tools and finally keep up to date with their own academic field of teaching. It is quite obvious that the teachers will have difficulties in following all of these demands. So, this problem will lead to splitting up the teacher’s role into different tasks carried out by a respective specialist, e.g. some of the lectures at Khan Academy are recorded with professional speakers or actors instead of the teachers voice. . In most cases the recorded lectures will not have the dynamics of the live lectures, because the teachers are aware that the material will be multiplied and distributed to a greater number of users.

One implication will be that some teachers will oppose to be reduced in their traditional role and autonomy. For those who accept the changing role they will take over a specialized task and will enter a system of coordinated professional production of teaching content. They will follow thereby the roads of early division of labour in distance education. A certain problem of the role of being just a facilitator lies in a tendency to present or moderate the views of other authors and not to develop their own view. The saying that “you have not to reinvent the wheel” is in a way not valid, because by reinventing also the knowledge embedded in the invention is reconstructed by the teacher and thus better understood by himself.

Another issue of importance is the trust that students will have for their teachers. In a time where many of the traditional functions of a university teacher are covered on the surface by content in the web or are accessible from the crowd of peers, the teacher will have to fight for establishing credibility. Students seem to trust often more on their co-students rather than on their teachers, eventually they even prefer to trust in search engines (World Economic Forum 2016, p. 18). Therefore at least some face to face contacts are so important to create a good emotional relation between the students and the teacher.

The educational policy makers

Educational policy makers usually are interested in limiting educational expenses without loosing efficiency. In a digital university environment they will have new options to use the available big data to influence and manage the entire sector. Formerly the main information items were enrollment data, number of graduates and programmes, salaries of employees and number of research publications. The huge quantity of digital data resulting from checking all workflow processes in detail offers ample possibilities to relate the different data and use them as inputs to manage the sector or the institution.

An important precondition is that data banks are compatible in their definitions and that programs to aggregate these data can be properly handled. To be effective the digitalized university needs to redefine IT supported processes which often implies structural adjustments towards decentralisation of the usually hierarchical organization of the academic and the administrative workflows. Otherwise it will not be able to react fast and flexible to the changing environment (Laaser, 2011). There have been made recently some interviews with leading staff of four European Universities but the results seem to be conflicting and the strategies towards innovations still rather vague (Bell et al., 2017).

 

Globalization of Higher Education

 

Who is interested in digital education, is it the individual learner, the teaching staff, the consumer or is it mainly the industry? As pointed out already there is hardly any academic discipline that is so closely related to industry like educational technology. Most of the academic conferences on educational technology are accompanied and sponsored by an exhibition of software and hardware vendors. Conference presentations frequently follow a simple modernization paradigm. The main interest seems to find out how educational applications can be identified for the new products developed for the consumer market. Therefore, critical issues such as detecting hidden ideologies or ethical problems embedded in vendor strategies are not very frequent. Buzzwords come and go at ease and keep the academic community going.

Today we observe that the educational global market is the target of the big educational technology providers. Translation is every time faster and easier to provide. Superficial localization became easier. With the globalisation a lot of underlying ideologies are connected.

The notion that the individual is best to control its learning progress, implies that the authority represented by the teacher is considered as an obstacle rather than being a partner or facilitator. The same ideology is underlying the claim that the crowd or peer group is the better teacher. The state and his academic institutions have to return to a policy that represent the social needs of the entire population. These needs do not match automatically industries interest.

MOOCs were concerned as a medium to ease access to everybody, that means to socialize a good that was accessible before only for a few. It is true that U.S. universities knowledge was opened-up a bit and was exported internationally at a subsidized price. It will probably loose some of its academic rigor and relate learning closer to edutainment accompanied by commercials (Bradford & Loble, 2016).

The xMOOCs have been criticized by the European Union for their low support of the teaching content delivered mainly by recorded lectures (EADTU 2015). However, in Europe the national differences are substantial and without special funding MOOCs will not survive in Europe either.

 

Conclusions

We tried to show in this article that the future of a “digital or digitized university” follows stepwise a trend towards more autonomous, individualized, interactive and media rich learning that can be traced back to the beginnings of distance education after world war two. So, a revolution or disruptive change in the way we learn and teach can not really be confirmed. Therefore, it is not surprising that after an intensive discussion of xMOOCs the conclusion remains that they represent in no way a disruptive approach and will end as another “come and go” episode of educational technology, at least what concerns the United States, or as Audray Watters puts it:

“After all, for many people edtech is a business, one that is quite excited by the prospect that – perhaps thanks to technologies – education itself is looking more and more like a private, consumer product rather than a public good. I think we must rethink both education practices and systems alongside our challenges to edtech as corporatisation and privatisation. Education technology is, after all, a series of practices itself – it isn’t just the hardware or software. Edtech carries with it ideologies and ideas” (Watters, 2017).

 

Rifkin writes in his book “The zero marginal cost society”, that different to Stanford’s students, who have to pay a fee of about 50.000 $ per year, the Udacity Online University had the objective to offer free university education for all, especially for the poor in developing countries (Rifkin, 2014, p.171). That unsupported, un-localized courses would be really a solution of the educational problems in developing countries, even if offered for free, is at best naive and reminds to the “One laptop per child” initiative of Negroponte.  In the meantime, Udacity courses and other American Moocs are anyway  not for free anymore.

 

The discussion of the possible influences showed that the future is still full of conflicting ideas and contradiction. A simple modernization paradigm according to  which the educational system just has to invest into the latest technology will be misleading. History is steered by interests of stakeholders and their conflict solving and cooperation ability. But also the general economic development is of considerable influence.

 

Educational network technology is based on the idea of a free economy and education will be regarded as a tradable good. So, governments are supposed to privatize the educational sector though education has been  regarded so far as a public good and not be determined by special interest groups. As the characteristics of educational software have some tendency towards natural monopolies we may expect a global educational market controlled by a few big players. If this will become our future, depends very much on the universities, their teachers and students to fight for their interests to determine change themselves. What the outcome of these struggles will be for a future “digital university” can hardly be determined by simple crystal gazing.

 

 

 

References

 

Allen I. E. & Seaman J. (2013), Changing Course. Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States. Babson Survey Research Group and Quahog Research Group, LLC

Baggaley, J. (2013). When prophecy fails. Distance Education Vol. 34, No. 1, p. 119-128

Baggaley, J. (2016) Sandcastle competitions, Distance Education Vol. 37, No. 3 366-375)

Bates, A. (2014) Why lectures are dead (or soon will be) Blogpost:  Online Learning and Distance Education Resources, July 27, 2014

https://www.tonybates.ca/2014/07/27/why-lectures-are-dead-or-soon-will-be/

Bell, C., Douce C. , Caeiro, S., Teixeira, A. Martín-Aranda, R.  & Otto,D. (2017)

Sustainability and distance learning: a diverse European experience?

pages: 1-8 | DOI: 10.1080/02680513.2017.1319638

Brabazon, T. (2007) The University of Google: Education in the post-information age. Aldershot.

Bradford, K. & Loble, M. (2016), M. Classroom Hollywood: Using popular Entertainment to Engage New MOOC Audiences, MOOCs European Stakeholder Summit 2016   365-373

Cooch, M., Foster, H.  & Costello, E. (2015) Our Moocs with Moodle, Position paper for European cooperation on MOOCs, EADTU 2015

Creelman, A. (2014) The corridor of uncertainty: Norwegian Mooc Commission.  Blog retrieved  from http://acreelman.blogspot.de/2014/06/norwegian-mooc-commission.html

 

EADTU (2015). Position Paper for European Cooperation on Moocs. Jansen & Texeira (Eds.), March 2015, Brussels

 

Gartner (2016) Gartner’s 2016 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies Identifies Three Key Trends that Organizations Must Track to Gain Competitive Advantage. Newsroom, August 16, 2016 http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/3412017

 

Hart, J. (2015) Learning in the Social Enterprise. http://c4lpt.co.uk/resources/litw/

Hassan, R. (2004) Media, Politics and the Network Society. McGraw-Hill Education. UK

Jansen, D. & Schuwer, R. (2014) (eds): Institutional MOOC strategies in Europe. Status report based on a mapping survey conducted in October – December 2014. EADTU, February 2015

Jansen, D.  & Goes-Daniels (2016), Comparing Institutional MOOOC Strategies, EADTU 2015

Jones, B. (2017) eLearning Trends of 2017  Art 23.2.2017

Laaser W., (2014) The rise and fall of the “Massively Open Online Courses” (Review article). SEEJPH 2014, posted: 11 November 2014. DOI 10.12908/SEEJPH-2014-33

Laaser, W (2011) Some structural changes on the way towards eUniversity, Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education, Jan. 2011, Vol. 12, No. 1

Laaser, W. (2008) Economics of Distance Education Reconsidered, The Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education (TODJE), Vol. 9, No. 3. July 2008

Larivière, V. , Haustein, S. & Mongeon P. (2015) The Oligopoly of Academic Publishers in the Digital Era. PloS One, 10 (6); DOI: 10.1371

Li, F. & Chen, X. (2012) Economies of Scope in Distance Education, IRRODL Vol. 13,3

Morgan, J. (2013), Universities challenged: The impact of Digital Technology on Teaching and Learning, Educational Innovation Position Paper, Universitas 21, 2013

NMC (2017), Horizon Report 2017 Higher Education Edition.

https://www.nmc.org/publication/nmc-horizon-report-2017-higher-education-edition/

OEB News (2017) Watters, A. How do we make education a “practice of freedom”? – talking to Audrey Watters, OEB News

Rifkin J. (2016) Die Null Grenzkosten Gesellschaft, Fischer Verlag, Frankfurt

Shacklock, X. (2016) From Bricks to Clicks. The Potential of data analytics in higher education. Higher Education Commission, London

Sharples, M., de Roock, R., Ferguson, R., Gaved, M., Herodotou, C., Koh, E., Kukulska-Hulme, A., Looi, C-K, McAndrew, P., Rienties, B., Weller, M., Wong, L. H. (2016). Innovating Pedagogy 2016: Open University Innovation Report 5. Milton Keynes: The Open University

Shy, Oz (2001) The economics of network Industries, Cambridge University Press

Siemens, G. Gaševic & Dawson, S. (2015) Preparing for the digital university: A review of the history and current state of distance, blended and online learning. Retrieved from http://linkresearchlab.org/preparingdigital university.pdf

Wagner, L. (1972). “The Economics of the Open University,” Higher

Education 1. 2:159-183

Watters, A. (2017) What’s on the Horizon (Still, again, always) for Ed-Tech                                                   http://hackeducation.com/2017/02/16/horizon

Williams, K; Kear, K.& Rosewell, Jon (2012) Quality Assessment for E-learning: a Benchmarking Approach (2nd ed.). Heerlen, The Netherlands: European Association of Distance Teaching Universities (EADTU).

            World Economic Forum (2016), Digital Media and Society: Implications in a Hyperconnected Era. Report, Geneva, Switzerland

 

 

       Disclosure statement

 

No potential conflict of interest was reported by the author.

 

 

       Notes on contributor

 

Dr. Wolfram Laaser was “Akademischer Direktor” at the Centre for Distance Education of FernUniversität in Hagen, Germany. He is consultant and  lectures face to face and/or online internationally.

 

 

 

 

Comment j’utilise les médias sociaux dans mes cours à l’université

 

 

 

 

Pierre Lévy

Professeur à l’Université d’Ottawa.

Ce travail est la pré-impression d’un article dans le numéro 58 de RED. Il sera publié en tant que contribution d’invité, dans le genre «histoire personnelle comme recherche éducative» (Personal History as Educational Research).

 

Cet article n’a d’autre but que de raconter mon expérience d’enseignement avec les médias sociaux dans mes cours de communication à l’Université d’Ottawa. Je ne prétends nullement servir de modèle. Si j’avais cependant deux conseils à donner, je recommanderais d’abord aux enseignants de toujours penser à l’utilisation des médias sociaux dans une perspective pédagogique, en les intégrant dès l’origine dans le design de leur cours et dans l’évaluation des étudiants. Mon second conseil est de ne jamais appliquer une méthode toute faite. Ils devront plutôt acquérir par l’expérience une maîtrise de l’apprentissage collaboratif dans les médias sociaux puis amener les étudiants le plus près possible de leur propre niveau. La méthode changera donc avec le degré d’apprentissage de l’enseignant et devra tenir compte du savoir-faire des étudiants, du contexte disciplinaire, social, etc. Le chemin d’apprentissage personnel de l’enseignant joue un rôle essentiel dans la forme et la qualité de son enseignement.

Dans les cours que je donne à l’Université d’Ottawa, je demande à mes étudiants de participer à un groupe Facebook fermé, de s’enregistrer sur Twitter, d’ouvrir un blog s’ils n’en n’ont pas déjà un et d’utiliser une plateforme de curation collaborative de données comme Scoop.it, Diigo ou Pocket.

L’usage de plateformes de curation de contenu me sert à enseigner aux étudiants comment choisir des catégories ou « tags » pour classer les informations utiles dans une mémoire à long terme, afin de les retrouver facilement par la suite. Cette compétence leur sera fort utile dans le reste de leur carrière.

Les blogs sont utilisés comme supports de « devoir final » pour les cours gradués (c’est-à-dire avant le master), et comme carnets de recherche pour les étudiants en maîtrise ou en doctorat : notes sur les lectures, formulation d’hypothèses, accumulation de données, première version d’articles scientifiques ou de chapitres des mémoires ou thèses, etc. Le carnet de recherche public facilite la relation avec le superviseur et permet de réorienter à temps les directions de recherche hasardeuses, d’entrer en contact avec les équipes travaillant sur les mêmes sujets, etc.

Le groupe Facebook est utilisé pour partager le Syllabus ou « plan de cours », l’agenda de la classe, les lectures obligatoires, les discussions internes au groupe – par exemple celles qui concernent l’évaluation – ainsi que les adresses électroniques des étudiants (Twitter, blog, plateforme de curation sociale, etc.). Toutes ces informations sont en ligne et accessibles d’un seul clic, y compris les lectures obligatoires. Les étudiants peuvent participer à l’écriture de mini-wikis à l’intérieur du groupe Facebook sur des sujets de leur choix, ils sont invités à suggérer des lectures intéressantes reliées au sujet du cours en ajoutant des liens commentés. J’utilise Facebook parce que la quasi-totalité des étudiants y sont déjà abonnés et que la fonctionnalité de groupe de cette plateforme est bien rodée. Mais j’aurais pu utiliser n’importe quel autre support de gestion de groupe collaboratif, comme Slack ou les groupes de Linkedin.

Sur Twitter, la conversation propre à chaque classe est identifiée par un hashtag. Au début, j’utilisais le médium à l’oiseau bleu de manière ponctuelle. Par exemple, à la fin de chaque classe je demandais aux étudiants de noter l’idée la plus intéressante qu’ils avaient retenu du cours et je faisais défiler leurs tweets en temps réel sur l’écran de la classe. Puis, au bout de quelques semaines, je les invitais à relire leurs traces collectives sur Twitter pour rassembler et résumer ce qu’ils avaient appris et poser des questions – toujours sur Twitter – si quelque chose n’était pas clair, questions auxquelles je répondais par le même canal.

Au bout de quelques années d’utilisation de Twitter en classe, je me suis enhardi et je demande maintenant aux étudiants de prendre directement leurs notes sur ce medium social pendant le cours de manière à obtenir un cahier de notes collectif. Pouvoir regarder comment les autres prennent des notes (que ce soit sur le cours ou sur des textes à lire) permet aux étudiants de comparer leurs compréhensions et de préciser ainsi certaines notions. Ils découvrent ce que les autres ont relevé et qui qui n’est pas forcément ce qui les a stimulés eux-mêmes… Quand je sens que l’attention se relâche un peu, je leur demande de s’arrêter, de réfléchir à ce qu’ils viennent d’entendre et de noter leurs idées ou leurs questions, même si leurs remarques ne sont pas directement reliées au sujet du cours. Twitter leur permet de dialoguer librement entre eux sur les sujets étudiés sans déranger le fonctionnement de la classe. Je consacre toujours la fin du cours à une période de questions et de réponses qui s’appuie sur un visionnement collectif du fil Twitter. Cette méthode est particulièrement pertinente dans les groupes trop grands (parfois plus de deux cents personnes) pour permettre à tous les étudiants de s’exprimer oralement. Je peux répondre tranquillement aux questions après la classe en sachant que mes explications restent inscrites dans le fil du groupe. La conversation pédagogique se poursuit entre les cours.

En utilisant Facebook et Twitter en classe, les étudiants n’apprennent pas seulement la matière du cours mais aussi une façon « cultivée » de se servir des médias sociaux. Documenter ses petits déjeuners ou la dernière fête bien arrosée, disséminer des vidéos de chats et des images comiques, échanger des insultes entre ennemis politiques, s’extasier sur des vedettes du show-business ou faire de la publicité pour telle ou telle entreprise sont certainement des usages légitimes des médias sociaux. Mais on peut également entretenir des dialogues constructifs dans l’étude d’un sujet commun. On peut du même coup tisser des réseaux personnels d’apprentissage, c’est-à-dire collectionner des sources (individus, organisations) pertinentes pour se maintenir au courant dans les domaines d’expertise que l’on veut approfondir. (Dans le cas de Twitter, les réseaux personnels d’apprentissage prennent la forme de « listes » de personnes que l’on suit sur un sujet donné. Une liste bien construite permet de filtrer les tweets par sujets…) L’usage des médias sociaux en classe me permet de faire prendre conscience à mes étudiants qu’ils s’expriment dans une mémoire publique et qu’ils sont responsables des traces qu’ils y laissent, des idées qu’ils y diffusent, des émotions qu’ils y propagent. En somme, si petit soit-il, un Tweet ou un post sur Facebook sont déjà des « publications » : le télégramme social exprime publiquement un point de vue, cite d’autres usagers et renvoie à des données au moyen d’hyperliens. La responsabilité de son auteur s’étend évidemment aux gens qui le suivent et le lisent directement ; mais elle comprend aussi les employeurs ou partenaires potentiels qui font des recherches sur sa personne ; elle se prolonge enfin à toutes les recommandations et décisions – politiques, économiques ou autres – qui suivent des traitements automatiques effectuées sur les messages en ligne ! L’usage pédagogique de Facebook et Twitter semble paradoxal à de nombreux étudiants qui conçoivent les médias sociaux comme un espace « réservé aux adolescents », libre des contraintes imposées par les parents et l’école. Mais si cette conception des médias sociaux était encore valable au début des années 2000 elle ne l’est plus aujourd’hui puisque les médias sociaux sont devenus le moyen de communication dominant.

Quelles que soient les institutions dans lesquelles ils travaillent, j’estime que les enseignants devraient construire avec leurs étudiants des communautés ouvertes de pratique, de dialogue et de réflexion utilisant les plateformes gratuites qui sont déjà utilisées par les élèves et le grand public. Les plateformes fermées élèvent des murs virtuels qui bloquent les contacts transversaux pertinents avec des experts et d’autres communautés d’apprentissage. En revanche, l’usage de plateformes ouvertes inscrit résolument l’Université – et plus généralement l’école – dans le nouvel espace public. J’avoue que je ne crois pas aux « technologies éducatives ». Je donne ma préférence aux usages pédagogiques des techniques de communication grand public qui sont déjà utilisées par les étudiants. L’important n’est ni la plateforme, ni le logiciel ni la collection de ressources, mais les compétences cognitives trans-plateformes et trans-contenus dont les pratiques éducatives doivent stimuler l’acquisition. Ce n’est pas Twitter qui doit polariser l’attention des étudiants, mais l’apprentissage de la clarté, de la brièveté et de la synthèse dans un dialogue où se construit la connaissance réflexive. De même, telle ou telle plateforme de curation de contenu n’est qu’un outil grâce auquel l’étudiant va s’initier à la catégorisation intelligente des données pour leur mutualisation dans une mémoire commune.

L’usage éducatif des média sociaux publics peut aller jusqu’à inclure les examens et les devoirs. J’ai expérimenté un « examen Twitter » où les étudiants devaient évaluer vingt de mes tweets en temps réel. Le code de communication était le suivant : pas de réaction s’ils pensaient que mon Tweet était faux, un coeur s’il contenait une part de vérité, un retweet s’ils étaient en gros d’accord et un retweet plus un coeur s’ils étaient complètement d’accord. Cela revenait à leur demander d’évaluer mes tweets sur une échelle de pertinence de 1 à 4. Après avoir relu avec eux mes tweets et les réponses qu’ils leur avaient donné, je leur demandais quel était, selon eux, la plus catastrophique des erreurs d’appréciation. Evidemment, les étudiants différaient dans leur estimation de la pire réponse. Je retenais toutes celles qu’ils avaient mentionnées et je retirais un point à tous ceux qui avaient donné l’une des mauvaises réponses identifiées par le groupe. Ainsi mon évaluation appliquait aux étudiants les règles qu’ils avaient eux-mêmes déterminées.

J’utilise maintenant une autre méthode d’évaluation, qui suppose la prise de note et le dialogue continu sur Twitter. Deux fois par semestre, les étudiants doivent relire la mémoire collaborative de la classe et sélectionner les éléments (notes de cours, questions, réponses, diagrammes, photos…) qui leur paraissent les plus intéressants ou les plus pertinents afin de construire un récit commenté de leur propre apprentissage. Ils peuvent pour ce faire utiliser les Moments de Twitter ou encore Storify. Au moyen de citations plus ou moins commentées, chaque étudiant produit alors son histoire d’apprentissage – son interprétation originale du cours – selon ses intérêts et sa subjectivité propre. Toutes les histoires d’apprentissage sont publiées sur Twitter avec le hashtag du cours, ce qui permet d’observer non seulement l’accumulation de la mémoire collective mais également la multitude des réflexions personnelles sur cette mémoire, avec leurs complémentarités et leurs divergences.

Dans les deux cas – qu’il s’agisse de l’estimation de la pertinence de mes tweets ou du résumé personnel du cours que je demande aux élèves – l’exercice évalué demande aux participants de faire un retour réflexif sur leur apprentissage collectif. A la fin du semestre, les étudiants ont non seulement acquis une connaissance du sujet enseigné mais ils ont aussi amélioré leurs compétences en apprentissage collaboratif dans un environnement trans-plateforme et ils ont peu ou prou expérimenté un processus d’intelligence collective réflexive dans la nouvelle sphère publique. Dans leur immense majorité, les étudiants apprécient un dispositif d’apprentissage dans lequel ils sont plus actifs, s’ennuient moins et apprennent mieux. Ce type d’expérimentation et de perfectionnement pédagogique est aujourd’hui exploré un peu partout dans le monde.

En réfléchissant sur ma pratique d’enseignant depuis une dizaine d’années, je réalise qu’elle repose sur un modèle de l’apprentissage collaboratif à trois phases : 1) une pratique commune, 2) un dialogue sur cette pratique, 3) une réflexion collective émergeant du dialogue et qui vient enrichir la pratique en retour. Dans mon cas, la pratique commune est fort simple puisqu’il s’agit de la prise de notes. Comme cette pratique est enregistrée et partagée en temps réel, elle implique immédiatement une activité collaborative et pose les bases du dialogue et de la réflexion ultérieure. Le dialogue, ou plutôt le multilogue, a lieu sur un mode transversal entre tous les membres de la communauté d’apprentissage et non seulement entre le professeur et les étudiants. Aussi bien les élèves que l’enseignant peuvent poser des questions et y répondre. Qui a besoin de conseils ou d’encouragements ? Comment reformuler telle ou telle notion ? Tel exemple est-il pertinent ? De nouvelles ressources ou références peuvent-elles faciliter la compréhension des élèves ? Une simple image trouvée sur Internet par un étudiant fait parfois la différence. Enfin, la réflexion s’appuie sur une relecture de la mémoire enregistrée de la classe. A la fin du semestre, les étudiants sont suffisamment familiers avec le sujet du cours pour créer un ou plusieurs documents multimédias où sont mis en oeuvre les compétences, connaissances et réflexions personnelles qui ont émergé du dialogue et de l’expérience gagnées par la fréquentation de la classe. Dès aujourd’hui, les étudiants en informatique publient leurs travaux et leurs discussions sur Github afin d’obtenir la reconnaissance de leurs pairs et d’afficher leurs compétences auprès des employeurs potentiels. Pourquoi les étudiants en sciences humaines ne suivraient-ils pas leurs traces ?

Supposons maintenant qu’au lieu de représenter les connaissances acquises au moyen d’un diplôme ou d’un crédit (la cote d’un cours et la note obtenue), on les représente par un enregistrement de l’ensemble des transactions pédagogiques publiques auxquelles a participé un étudiant : pratiques, dialogues, oeuvres témoignant des compétences et de la réflexion développées (Grech and Camilleri, 2017). … Ce qui serait enregistré et authentifié ne serait plus un bref document statique et relativement opaque – comme aujourd’hui – mais une fenêtre sur l’apprentissage collaboratif vivant où le professeur et les étudiants se rendent mutuellement témoignage. La garantie des apprentissages individuels ne serait plus séparée du processus d’intelligence collective d’où les savoirs ont émergé et où ils ont pris sens. Indépendamment des mutations institutionnelles et culturelles qu’elle implique, une telle évolution de la reconnaissance des savoirs serait aujourd’hui techniquement possible. Les blockchains sont des registres informatisés qui contiennent l’historique de tous les échanges et transactions effectués entre ses utilisateurs depuis leur création. Ces bases de données sont sécurisées par un procédé cryptographique et partagées par leurs différents utilisateurs sans intermédiaire. D’abord utilisée en finance et en comptabilité, la technologie de la blockchain se répand aujourd’hui dans d’autres secteurs d’application. L’éducation et – plus généralement – l’authentification des expériences professionnelles et des compétences pourrait être une de ses futures applications vedette. Ainsi, à la fin d’un semestre, la mémoire de l’apprentissage collaboratif d’une classe, avec la participation de chaque étudiant, serait enregistrée et authentifiée par une blockchain. Cette nouvelle reconnaissance des savoirs amènerait un gain de transparence pour les contribuables qui financent l’éducation et pour les employeurs ou les collaborateurs potentiels des étudiants. Elle fournirait en outre aux institutions d’enseignement des flots de données fort précieuses pour étudier les évolutions cognitives et la qualité des apprentissages de leurs publics. De telles données seraient beaucoup plus précises et complètes que celles qui sont recueillies aujourd’hui au moyen d’évaluations après-coup et de sondages forcément partiels. Contrairement aux données récoltées au moyen des grilles fermées que l’on emploie souvent dans les enquêtes, elles ne préjugeraient pas des questions qui pourraient leur être posées. Les chercheurs pourraient interroger ces données au moyen d’algorithmes aussi variés que leurs hypothèses.

 

Quelques extraits des tweets de mes classes : https://twitter.com/plevy/moments

Hashtags de mes classes : #UOKM #UONM #UOAC #UOIM #UOTM17

 

Ressources en ligne et exemples de curation par l’auteur

 

BIBLIOGRAPHIE

 

Barton, S. (2013). Social capital framework in the adoption of e-learning. International Jl. on E-Learning, 12 (2), 115-137.

 

Biskupic, I., Lackovic, S., & Kresimir, J. (2015). Successful and proactive e-learning environment fostered by teachers’ motivation in technology use. Social and Behavioral Sciences, 174, 3656-3662.

Bozanta, A., & Mardikyan, S. (2017). The effects of social media use on collaborative learning: A case of Turkey. Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education, 18(1), 96-110.

 

Chugh, R., 2016. Harnessing social media as a knowledge management tool. IGI Global. Hershey, Pennsylvanie.

 

Cooke, S. (2017). Social teaching: Student perspectives on the inclusion of social media in higher education. Education and Information Technologies, 22(1), 255-269.

 

Craig-Hare, J. et al. (2017). The Effect of Socioscientific Topics on Discourse within an Online Game Designed to Engage Middle School Students in Scientific Argumentation, Journal of Education in Science, Environment and Health . DOI: 10.21891/jeseh.325783

Danley, St., Dahan, T., & Benson, K. (2017). Publishing as social capital: Amplifying community with digital tools. Journal of Scholarly Publishing, 48(2), 116-130.

 

Grech, A. and Camilleri, A. F. (2017). Blockchain in Education. Inamorato dos Santos, A.(ed.) EUR 28778 EN; doi:10.2760/60649

 

Lepage, N. L. (2017). Des classes qui collaborent et apprennent avec Twitter. In Ecole branchée. Retrieved from: https://ecolebranchee.com/2017/01/19/classes-collaborent-apprennent-twitter/

 

Levy, P. (2004). Inteligencia colectiva. Trad. Organización Panamericana de la Salud. Washington, DC. Retrieved from: http://inteligenciacolectiva.bvsalud.org/public/documents/pdf/es/inteligenciaColectiva.pdf

 

Levy, P. (2011). The Semantic Sphere. Computation, cognition and information economy. ISTE / Wiley, Paris and London.

Megele, C. (2015). eABLE. Embedding social media in academic curriculum as a learning and assessment strategy to enhance students learning and e-professionalism. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 52(4), 414-425.

 

Redecker, C. Punie, Y (2017). Digital competence framework for educators, Publications office of the European Union, DOI online: 10.2760/159770

 

Reinie, L. and Wellman, B. 2012. Networked: The New Social Operating System, MIT Press, Cambridge Mass.

 

Rowland, A. et al. (2017). Social media: How the next generation can practice argumentation, Educational Media International. DOI: 10.1080/09523987.2017.1362818

 

Université Laval (2017). Guide sur l’utilisation des appareils mobiles en classe. Retrieved from: http://www.capres.ca/2017/05/guide-lutilisation-appareils-mobiles-classe/

 

Wan, Y. (2014). Building student trust in online learning environments, Distance Education, 35 (3), 345–359.

Indice H y citación colaborativa

La base de las métricas sobre edición científica y sobre la difusión de la investigación son las citas que cada trabajo recibe.

El índice H, la mediana H, y sus derivados H5 y mediana H5, tienen como base para su cálculo las citas.

Por su partes, las citas tienen como referencia el trabajo publicado (artículo, paper, libro, capítulo de libro, texto de la ponencia en un proceeding, etc.) y se asignan todas las un mismo trabajo a cada uno de sus autores, independientemente del número de estos que haya y de la participación que cada uno tenga en el trabajo.

El número de citas (citación), y los índices H, se aceptan universalmente porque son transparentes. Al menos en Google Scholar Metrics (GSM) se puede ver fácilmente de donde proceden todas y cada una de las citas, y se pueden impugnar cuando no sean correctas. El autor  también puede retractarse con una fácil operación. Y si no lo hace es igualmente visible… y sufre su reputación.

También el índice H es más aceptado que otros, como el índice de impacto, que utiliza JCR (por la comunidad, no por las autoridades españolas, ANECA, etc.), porque es visible su obtención, y sobre todo porque su cálculo no se limita exclusivamente a las citas de la agencia que los obtiene. En el caso de JCR, a las citas que se producen en las bases de datos de Clarivate (antes Thomson-Reuters).

Sin embargo la citación y sus derivados, los índices y medianas, y otros promedios H, tiene sus críticas, que básicamente se reducen a dos:

El sistema GSM mezcla, en español y en otros idiomas distintos del inglés, todas las especialidades. Y esto se reproduce en los rankings y listas que los toman como derivados, como es el caso del Ranking Web de Universidades y el de Investigadores en la web, del Cybermetrics Lab del CSIC. Sin embargo no es lo mismo la citación, por ejemplo, en Ciencias de la Salud, donde a la investigación básica, o simplemente a la investigación,  se atribuyen las citas procedentes de las prácticas profesionales y de las innovaciones en la práctica, que en Ciencias Sociales, particularmente en Educación, donde no es costumbre publicar prácticas e innovaciones profesionales, o no se fundamentan adecuadamente. Y como consecuencia, en este caso, no se publican como implementación de investigaciones en revistas científicas, ni en congresos homologados, y no contribuyen a la citación. Así pues la citación en Ciencias de la Salud es mucho más abundante que en Ciencias Experimentales, Matemáticas, Filosofía o en Ciencias de la Educación y del Aprendizaje. Este efecto, esta mezcla indiferenciada, no se produce así en los rankings de revistas en inglés de GSM, donde los dominios y áreas científicas están delimitadas, y las comparaciones se producen entre publicaciones homogéneas.

La otra crítica tiene su origen en que el índice H considera igual las citas que se producen como autores únicos y las que se producen como coautores. Como hemos dicho antes, la consideración  de las citas se hace por igual a todos los autores de un mismo trabajo, sea cual sea el número de estos y sea cual sea su contribución.

Vamos a dejar de lado, por ahora, lo primero y vamos a centrarnos en esto último.

No hay nada que garantice que la participación de todos los participantes en una publicación sea la misma, ni como requisito general ni en las prácticas editoriales. Tampoco de que, en un caso extremo, no haya coautores que no hayan contribuido nada  o lo hayan hecho en una porción irrelevante.

Así podría darse el caso de que cinco autores hiciesen cada uno una publicación y se pusieran de acuerdo de manera que cada uno de ellos figurase como autor en todas las demás. Esto llevaría a multiplicar por cinco, más o menos, las citas que obtendría si solo figurase cada uno como autor de su trabajo. No hay nada que nos asegure que esto no suceda, y sería una grave e injusta discriminación para autores que publican en correspondencia con su trabajo.

Pero por otro lado, en la investigación, como señalan Austin J. Parish, Kevin W. Boyack, John PA Ioannidis  (2018) y otros autores, es fundamental, en casi todas las modalidades, el trabajo colaborativo. Es indispensable. Por la complejidad de los procesos, por la división de funciones y tareas, lo cual todos aceptan que es un factor de productividad en la investigación y sobre todo por computar cuestiones como son la experiencia o las labores de coordinación. Por tanto se hace justo y es necesario tener en cuenta de forma efectiva estas situaciones, fomentarlas y valorarlas. También aportar procedimientos que garanticen de forma rigurosa qué modalidades de colaboración se producen, la relevancia de éstas y formas eficientes de asegurarlas.

Mientras eso no se produce o no se generaliza, planteamos un índice, al que provisionalmente llamaremos citación colaborativa, y una opción para utilizar de forma contextualizada que palíe y que tenga en cuanta ambas situaciones potencialmente distorsionantes. Sería un valor intermedio, para el caso que el número de autores sea dos o mayor, entre la asignación de todas las citas a todos y la fracción número de citas / número de autores (c/n) a cada uno de ellos.

El índice sería

Donde c es el número de citas atribuido al artículo, n es el número de autores, y b es la base de los logaritmos que se aplican al número de autores.

El utilizar la función logarítmica  es porque se trata de una función cuyo incremento va disminuyendo en la medida a que crece la variable. La variación en el impacto del número de autores varía muy poco cuando crece mucho el número de estos.

La base b debería ser mayor que 2.  Si fuese ésta, en el caso particular de que los autores sean dos no se vería primado el trabajo en grupo de dos, dado que el índice coincidiría con la fracción. No se vería pues premiado en este caso la colaboración.

Veamos pues varios casos:

A) Base b=3

Nº autores Nº citas Coeficiente Fracción
1 10 10,00 10,00
2 10 6,13 5,00
3 10 5,00 3,33
4 10 4,42 2,50
5 10 4,06 2,00
6 10 3,80 1,67
7 10 3,61 1,43
8 10 3,46 1,25
9 10 3,33 1,11
10 10 3,23 1,00

Tabla 1

El coeficiente sería el equivalente al número de citas que se atribuiría a cada uno de los autores.  Obviamente sería un número racional (en expresión decimal), no un número entero, como sucede con las citas.

Las diferencias del coeficiente con el número de citas, tal como se atribuye ahora, o con la fracción de las citas repartidas entre todos daría lugar a un rico debate.

Otro ejemplo para este mismo caso podríamos verlo con otro número de citas, por ejemplo 20.  Adjuntamos la hoja de cálculo para que el lector interesado pueda hacer otras pruebas:

Nº autores Nº citas Coeficiente Fracción
1 20 20,00 20,00
2 20 12,26 10,00
3 20 10,00 6,67
4 20 8,84 5,00
5 20 8,11 4,00
6 20 7,60 3,33
7 20 7,22 2,86
8 20 6,91 2,50
9 20 6,67 2,22
10 20 6,46 2,00

Tabla2

 

B) Base b=5

Nº autores Nº citas Coeficiente Fracción
1 10 10,00 10,00
2 10 6,99 5,00
3 10 5,94 3,33
4 10 5,37 2,50
5 10 5,00 2,00
6 10 4,73 1,67
7 10 4,53 1,43
8 10 4,36 1,25
9 10 4,23 1,11
10 10 4,11 1,00

Tabla 3

Vemos como primera consecuencia y más visible que, a medida que aumenta la base del logaritmo, el factor correctivo disminuye (Comparar tabla 1 y tabla 3). Sería pues un factor determinante a la hora de definir el coeficiente, y sería el parámetro clave para aplicar en distintos temas y dominios donde le trabajo colaborativo tenga una importancia y una significación mayor o menor. No sería igual en artes o ámbitos de creatividad donde la divergencia sea un factor básico, que en análisis empíricos complejos de ciencias sociales o de ciencias experimentales.

Referencias.-

Parish, AJ, Boyack, KW, and Ioannidis, JP (2018). Dinámica de la coautoría y la productividad en diferentes campos de la investigación científica. PloS uno , 13 (1), e0189742. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0189742#pone-0189742-g002

Pensamiento computacional. Una tercera competencia clave (y IX). Iniciativas institucionales en educación formal: C. Educación Secundaria.

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Alcalá

Ésta es la novena entrada de una serie que, en conjunto, constituirán un capítulo de un libro que será  publicado por la editorial de la Universidad Católica de Santa María de Arequipa (Perú) con el título “El pensamiento computacional: La nueva alfabetización de las culturas digitales”.

En las anteriores entradas se han planteado distintas cuestiones: que el pensamiento computacional  debe constituir una tercera competencia clave dentro del curriculum escolar, qué son las alfabetizaciones y las culturas digitales , una definición de Pensamiento Computacional, cuáles son las habilidades y procedimientos que lo constituyen y en qué fases de la elaboración de un código intervienen y unas conclusiones de carácter general. En las tres últimas entregas, la tercera de las cuales es ésta, reseñamos las que se consideran experiencias y prácticas más notables de integración del Pensamiento Computacional, con el sentido expuesto, dentro del curriculum oficial o con repercusión en él.

 

Iniciativas institucionales en educación formal de Educación Secundaria relacionadas con pensamiento computacional

Anteriormente señalábamos diversas fuentes de donde obteníamos estos datos, si ha leído ya las entradas anteriores se puede saltar esta parte e ir directamente a las tablas de datos:

Básicamente del informe Computing our future Computer programming and coding Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe, versiones de 2014 (Balanskat & Engelhardt, October, 2014) y de 2015 (Balanskat & Engelhardt, October, 2015), el trabajo también de la Unión Europea (Bocconi et al, 2016) Developing Computational Thinking in Compulsory Education. Implications for policy and practice y la investigación, en preprint de ArXiv, de Lockwood & Mooney (2017) Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it Fit? A systematic literary review.

En ellos hemos podido constatar la existencia de iniciativas en el marco de la educación formal, promovidas por instituciones o por profesores, individualmente o en grupos, asociaciones, etc., pero siempre con reconocimiento y con repercusión en la acreditación y en la certificación de estudios formales.

Es importante enfatizar qué entendemos por iniciativas relacionadas con el Pensamiento Computacional: Son las que promueven un conjunto de competencias que, si bien son útiles y son utilizadas por los programadores en la elaboración de los códigos, sobre todo son útiles a los individuos en general, en otros contextos que no son los informáticos, para resolver problemas en su vida personal o profesional. O que en general constituyen o forman parte de métodos eficaces para trabajar en otras ciencias, técnicas o servicios, o para resolver problemas en sus respectivos ámbitos de conocimientos y con los objetivos que tienen atribuidos.

No tendremos en cuenta pues los casos de la inclusión de la programación pura y simple, la que sirve para hacer programas informáticos, en los currículos o en los sistemas formales de enseñanza. Por eso hemos excluido los casos de España o de muchos países de la UE que sí están contenplados en los informes Computing our future Computer programming and coding Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe.Aunque el debate sobre este particular está abierto, como lo hemos reseñado en el apartado “El primer dilema del Pensamiento Computacional”.

En la relación que sigue, podemos observar que hay situaciones muy consolidadas y muy potentes como pueda ser la del Reino Unido, junto con otras que o bien son institucionales y no han redundado en una práctica más o menos generalizada pero han sido recogidas por normativas reflejadas en el boletín oficial, o simplemente que hemos visto que hay constancia de ellas:

Secundaria
País Referencia Situación en el contexto del curriculum y del sistema educativo oficial Características en relación con la clasificación que hemos determinado (programación sólo / desarrollo de competencias específicas como área transversal) Cuáles de los elementos definidos se pueden detectar
UK- Inglaterra Curriculum Nacional

Orientación legal

Currículo nacional en Inglaterra: programas informáticos de estudio

Publicado el 11 de septiembre de 2013

 

Desarrollo de competencias específicas como área transversal Competencias específicas y competencias claves, reconocidas como tales, incluidas en el curriculum
UK- Escocia Curriculum escocés

 

Adoptan prácticamente uno similar al C.N. pero menos desarrollado Competencias específicas y competencias claves, reconocidas como tales, incluidas en el curriculum
UK-Gales e Irlanda del Norte Incorporan el curriculum nacional como curriculum galés o de Eire.

 

Adoptan el C.N.

Orientación legal

Currículo nacional en Inglaterra: programas informáticos de estudio

Publicado el 11 de septiembre de 2013

 

Competencias específicas y competencias claves, reconocidas como tales, incluidas en el curriculum
UK

Capacitación docente

Computer science in secondary schools in the UK: Ways to empower teachers.

Sentance, S., Dorling, M., & McNicol, A. (2013, February).

 

 

Reseñado en Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

Es una reflexión sobre las necesidades de formación docente que el PC plantea a partir de la situación creada en UK con el PC Los autores dicen que en Inglaterra y otras partes del Reino Unido, se ha asistido a una cantidad y de un alcance sin precedentes a cambios en la forma en que los planes de estudio cambian de un enfoque a otro en cómo se aprende con el uso de aplicaciones de software y a través de la introducción de la informática en las escuelas primarias y secundarias. En este documento describen algunos de los desafíos que enfrentamos, el progreso realizado en la integración de las CC y el apoyo brindado a los docentes en su desarrollo profesional. Pretenden como en otros casos apoyar a los docentes de una manera holística y proponen un modelo transformacional de desarrollo profesional para CC, tanto para maestros en servicio como formando la base de nuevos programas de capacitación docente.

Acompañan una investigación que describen:

Se distribuyó una encuesta a los maestros que deseaban asistir a cursos / capacitación de desarrollo profesional en CC. Concluyen que las áreas donde los docentes buscan apoyo son “orientación sobre las formas de enseñar informática” y la necesidad de recursos y herramientas.

También encontraron que los talleres de un día y el trabajo con un maestro experimentado eran el tipo de desarrollo más útil.

La administración de tiempos, y su consideración, fue el tema al que se dio más importancia con respecto a los maestros y a la voluntad de la escuela para participar en estos cambios.

Presentan algunos ejemplos de estos cursos de capacitación que incluyen Python School, Digital Schoolhouse y Computing at School Master Teachers.

Por último analizan dos temas a trabajar en el futuro: la acreditación y la investigación en la  acción.

EE UU Estándares de CSTA.

Computer Science K–12 Learning Standards Adoption Statement

Dorn, R. I. (December, 2016).

 

Son las directrices de la Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) aprobadas por la administración nacional de EE UU. Establecen los princios genéricos a tener en cuenta para integrar el pensamiento Computacional de EE UU en K-12 (Secundaria). Pero contiene también directrices para Primaria (Elementary School)
EE UU Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

 

Se presentan numerosos casos en los que se identifican y describen elementos de pensamiento computacional que sirven de apoyo a materias del curriculum: Matemáticas, Biología, Física, Lengua e Informática. La estructura y el tratamiento es muy común se trata de una formación transversal y su experimentación en destrezas del curriculum, como son matemáticas, lenguaje, conocimiento del medio, etc. Se aíslan y determinan elementos del PC como pueden ser

1) Abstracción

2) Tratamiento de datos

3) Gestión de recursos y herramientas informáticas

4) Algoritmos

5) Diseño

6) Evaluación

7) Visualización y representación de datos.

Frecuentemente va acompañado de una materia con contenidos que favorecen el aprendizaje y el trabajo tal como se hace en programación, suele ser de un lenguaje.

EE UU

Alabama

Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

 

Jenkins, J.T. et al (2012), March. A plan for immediate immersion of computational thinking into the high school math classroom through a partnership with the alabama math, science, and technology initiative

 

Se presentan numerosos casos en los que se identifican y describen elementos de pensamiento computacional que sirven de apoyo a materias del curriculum: Matemáticas, Biología, Física, Lengua e Informática. Otra modalidad es la inmersión de PC en una asignatura, con preferencia matemáticas.

Por ejemplo Jenkins et al. (2012) Describen un diseño para la inmersión de CT en las aulas de matemáticas de las escuelas secundarias en Alabama, EE. UU.

En su trabajo ofrecen una descripción general del estado de la informática en Alabama y una descripción de las matemáticas, ciencias y Iniciativa Tecnológica (AMSTI).

Incluido en ellas dirigieron un taller para líderes de educación matemática en el cual los maestros recibieron problemas para resolver en los que tenían que usar la abstracción, la generalización y la justificación. Luego usan Python para crear mini-programas para resolver los problemas. Los resultados mostraron que era una forma efectiva de hacer que los maestros utilizaran la programación en clases de matemáticas y que los maestros lo vieron como una nueva herramienta para enseñar el razonamiento matemático. También estaban ansiosos por aprender más sobre programación y cómo integrarlo en sus clases. No hay datos de metodologías y de prácticas de la integración con alumnos.

EE UU

Formación del Profesorado en PC

Liu, J. et al (2011, October). A survey on computer science K-12 outreach: Teacher training programs. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2011 (pp. T4F-1). IEEE. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/6143111/

Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

 

Formación docente en Pensamiento Computacional y Ciencias de la Computación para profesores y maestros de Secundaria (K-12) Liu et al. [16] presentan un resumen de una serie de programas de capacitación docente de profesores de K-12 para mejorar la educación de Ciencias de la Computación y PC.

Señala programas y los analiza:

De Cálculo, en el Instituto de Tecnología de Georgia

Un programa de  Disciplinary Commons en Georgia Institute of Technology

Estudios de verano de Computación para profesores de K-12 en University of California, Los Angeles

Vinculación de Matemáticas y Computación en Purdue University

Un taller de bioinformática en la Universidad Estatal de Winona

Formación docente en Computación  en la Universidad de Saint Joseph

CS4HS en la Universidad Carnegie Mellon

Rebótica en la Universidad Carnegie Mellon

Capacitación de Alice en la Universidad de Duke

Pensamiento Computacional para las Ciencias en la Universidad Marquette

Computación para el programa de Maestros K-12 en la Universidad Lamar

En el trabajo se establece una taxonomía  comparando los cursos anteriores entre sí usando categorías tales como duración, materia, grado y organizador. Así como las herramientas de capacitación utilizadas. El documento, en la parte de análisis empírico concluye que los programas de capacitación han demostrado ser un medio eficaz para hacer que CC sea accesible para los maestros. Los autores también señalan que, aunque actualmente no hay suficiente evidencia para mostrar que el mismo impacto se produjo en los estudiantes, los resultados de la evaluación de esos programas de capacitación mostraron que la mayoría de los docentes podría incorporar el conocimiento y los materiales obtenidos de la capacitación en sus clases.

EE UU

California

The fairy performance assessment: measuring computational thinking in middle school.

Por Werner, L., Denner, J., Campe, S., & Kawamoto, D. C. (2012, February).

Recogido en Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?.

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

Describimos estos estudios porque los incluyen James Lockwood y Aidan Mooney en su trabajo, pero en ningún momento se deduce que sean estudios formales, ni mucho menos de Common Core o de aplicación de los estándares de CSTA. Tienen interés como experiencias de PC orientado a otras materias, y sobre todo como referencia para evaluación y calidad de estos programas y enseñanzas. Werner et al. (2012) describen los resultados de evaluación del aprendizaje obtenidos por  una herramienta de evaluación del rendimiento para medir habilidades de TC en el medio californiano (centros y muestra de a costa central de California). Se trata pues de un tema específico de evaluación de rendimiento de PC, que puede tener interés para estas cuestiones: Cómo organizar y cómo evaluar la calidad de estas enseñanzas.
Irlanda Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

PACT: An initiative to introduce computational thinking to second-level education in Ireland. Mooney et al (2014).

Numerosas iniciativas transversales. Ninguna en el curriculum estatal.

En la República de Irlanda, como en muchos otros países, la Ciencia de la Computación o la Informática todavía no es un tema que los estudiantes pueden realizar un examen estatal. Aunque se han tomado medidas para incluirlo, hasta ahora, todo lo que está disponible para los estudiantes en el currículum es un curso corto de programación

Como ejemplo y formando parte de este movimiento, los investigadores del Departamento de Ciencias de la Computación de la Universidad de Maynooth, Irlanda, diseñaron el programa PACT. PACT es un acrónimo de Programming ^ Algorithms = Computational Thinking. La esperanza era presentar a los estudiantes y profesores de secundaria irlandeses a la informática a través de programación y algoritmos, con la esperanza de mejorar la habilidad vital de CT en los estudiantes participantes. Ahora en su 4º año, el programa PACT ha sido entregado en más de 60 escuelas y más de 1000 estudiantes.
Israel Implementing a new computer science curriculum for middle school in Israel.

Bargury, I. Z., Muller, O., Haberman, B., Zohar, D., Cohen, A., Levy, D., & Hotoveli, R. (2012, October).

Reseñado en Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

En Israel no existe como tal PC incluido en el curriculum nacional, ni como competencias transversales. Lo que nos presenta Bargury et al es una propuesta que es aceptada y se incluye como una materia de secundaria, suponemos que optativa, de Computación. Sólo que aquí la novedad es el sesgo que se da a esta materia: Se la considera con los objetivos y contenidos de PC. Obviamente esta propuesta tiene elementos de ser un modelo distinto pero viable de integración del PC Bargury et al. (2012, octubre) presentan su plan de estudios para la escuela media israelí en el que plantean introducir a los estudiantes en los fundamentos de CC y PC. A partir de esto, Computación se incluyó en las escuelas secundarias, así como en una disciplina de ingeniería de software. El objetivo de esta nueva materia de la escuela intermedia no era hacer programadores a los estudiantes, sino enseñarles el pensamiento lógico y algorítmico y introducirlos en la programación. La materia contiene cuatro módulos impartidos durante tres años (180 horas, dos por semana), cada uno de estos módulos se resume de la siguiente manera:

 Módulo 1 – Expone a los estudiantes a los fundamentos de CT y programación tales como bucles, variables de ejecución y manejo de eventos. Scratch se usa para enseñar esto

 Módulo 2: investigación científica usando hojas de cálculo (requeridas para matemáticas y física, de modo que se crucen los currículos)

 Módulo 3 – Optativa: Introducción a la Robótica, Programación Básica de Internet (HTML5 y Javascript)

 Módulo 4 – Proyecto de programación (incluye una propuesta, modelando un problema, diseñando e implementando una solución)

Israel A new curriculum for junior-high in computer science.

Zur Bargury, I. (2012, July).

Reseñado en Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

El Ministerio de Educación de Israel ha lanzado un programa único para mejorar la educación en ciencia y tecnología. Es un programa de seis años para los grados siete a doce. El programa presenta un nuevo plan de estudios en ciencias de la computación para estudiantes de secundaria. El plan de estudios de ciencias de la computación se enfoca en desarrollar el pensamiento computacional. El propósito de este trabajo es describir ese plan de estudios y la evaluación preliminar de los logros de los estudiantes. Está descrito en el item anterior, es el mismo proyecto.
Polonia Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

Sysło, M. M., & Kwiatkowska, A. B. (2015, September). Learning Mathematics supported by computational thinking. Constructionism and Creativity.

No existe constancia de que el pensamiento computacional se incluya no solo como estudios del curriculum nacional, sino ni tan siquiera como actividad trasversal o integrada en las disciplinas troncales.

Sí existe un tratamiento de actividades en los libros de texto de Computación que podría trasladarse a matemáticas

Sysło y Kwiatkowska (2015) desde el punto de vista académico plantean cómo los conceptos de PC se pueden incorporar a las matemáticas escolares formales y ayudar a mejorar la experiencia de aprendizaje de los alumnos. Presentan como ejemplos extraidos de la realidad, en los libros de texto de secundaria de informática (CS) en Polonia. Y contrastan que estén ausentes de los libros de texto de matemáticas y muestran cómo pueden contribuir.

En ese trabajo plantean algunos ejemplos de los temas y dicen cómo  están vinculados a las matemáticas, faciulitando el aprendizaje de algunos temas:

 Recursividad -> que es difícil para las matemáticas, y  más fácil después de enseñar en Informática

 Pensamiento heurístico -> algoritmos de prueba/error, algoritmos codiciosos, de ruta más corta, etc.

Brasil Discussing the challenges related to deployment of computational thinking in brazilian basic education.

Carvalho, T., Andrade, D., Silveira, J., Auler, V., Cavalheiro, S., Aguiar, M., Foss, L., Pernas, A. and Reiser, R. (2013, October).

Computational Thinking: Possibilities and Challenges.

Ribeiro, L., Nunes, D.J., Da Cruz, M.K. and Matos, E.D.S. (2013, October).

Reseñado en Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

En Brasil no existe una integración transversal o en el curriculum nacional o de otros niveles de enseñanzas de PC. Si embargo estos documentos son un claro avance en los trabajos previos para incluirlos Carvalho et al. (2013) presentan un documento sobre las dificultades en el despliegue de CT en educación, específicamente en su contexto de Educación Básica y Media Brasileña. Ofrecen una descripción general de CT, así como algunos ejemplos de otros cursos e iniciativas para promover CT en la educación. Presentan igualmente algunos desafíos que el sistema educativo brasileño plantea para la incorporación del CT. Estos son:

 Falta de infraestructura, es decir, faltan ordenadores, wifi, etc.

 ¿Reordenación del plan de estudios, es decir, qué contenidos nuevos deben incluir las disciplinas nuevs o ser incorporado en otras? Debido a la estructura de las instituciones educativas en Brasil, cualquiera de estos es posible ya que es un sistema bastante flexible

 Cualificación y antecedentes de los instructores, es decir, ¿se necesita un grado de informática adaptado o un nuevo perfil?

 Estrategias para diseminar CT, es decir, talleres, libros de texto, etc.

 

Riberiro et al. (2013) también analizan algunos desafíos y posibilidades para incluir el PC en las escuelas brasileñas.

Están de acuerdo con Carvalho et al. en que se necesitarían cambios curriculares y la capacitación de los educadores de Computación es vital. También citan las Políticas del Gobierno como un problema potencial y señalan que es importante que el gobierno cree grupos de trabajo para liderar la inclusión de PC en la educación. También concluyen que las personas y las tradiciones en el aprendizaje pueden ser reacias a incluir el PC, ya que pueden ser difícil de convencerles de que es una habilidad que es necesaria y todavía no poseen.

Portugal Documento de ANPRI-Ledesma et al incluido como capítulo en este libro.
Dinamarca Computational thinking and practice: A generic approach to computing in Danish high schools.

Caspersen, M. E., & Nowack, P. (2013, January).

 

Reseñado en Computational Thinking in Education: Where

 

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

Computing our future Computer programming and coding Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe versión de 2015 (Balanskat & Engelhardt, October, 2015)

En Dinamarca (en los grados 7 al 10), la codificación está integrada en los Objetivos para Física y Química, con los siguientes contenidos

• Conocimiento sobre programación simple y transmisión de datos.

• Lenguajes de programación y habilidades de programación de soluciones digitales simples (Física y química).

• En Matemáticas para mejorar el pensamiento sistemático y abstracto con orientación específica.

En Grados 11-13 (educación secundaria superior), la codificación se intercala en la asignatura opcional Tecnología de la información. Actualmente, este curso es un curso piloto aprobado, que se prevé que se convierta en una asignatura optativa en el plan de estudios (Tratamiento de ley pendiente).

• Uso de tecnologías de programación para el desarrollo de productos de TI y adaptación de sistemas de TI existentes (estructuras de datos como condiciones anidadas, diferentes tipos de bucles, funciones que acoplan diferentes tecnologías de programación, enfoques de programación tales como Mejora gradual, Programación orientada a objetos, etc.)

El trabajo de Caspersen y Nowack  (2013) describe el modelo que están adoptando en Dinamarca

Caspersen y Nowack  (2013) presentan un enfoque nuevo y genérico para la informática en las escuelas secundarias danesas. Se basa en un marco que construyeron a partir de ideas basadas en ideas relacionadas con PC. Ofrecen una visión general de la informática en danés

Las escuelas secundarias antes de presentar dos tesis ‘de las que se basa y luego dar una visión general de los módulos (llamados “Áreas de conocimiento”).

La tesis ‘es que:

 “A través de la informática, las personas pueden crear y manejar pensamientos, procesos, productos y servicios que creen oportunidades nuevas, efectivas y de cruce de fronteras, imposibles sin tecnología digital”.

 “Existe un conjunto fundacional común y compartido de conceptos, principios y prácticas computacionales, que se puede aplicar de manera deliberada con la ciencia, las artes y las humanidades, y las ciencias de la salud y la vida”.

Las áreas de conocimiento son las siguientes:

 Importancia e impacto: se utilizan áreas de informática relevantes / significativas.

 Arquitectura de aplicaciones: arquitectura de TI de sistemas (presentación, lógica, datos)

 Digitalización: representación y manipulación de datos

 Programación y Programabilidad: introducción a la programación

 Abstracción y modelado: datos de modelado

 Diseño de interacción: describir y analizar el diseño de la interfaz, implementarlo

 Innovación: perspectiva de producto y proceso

A continuación, ofrecen una descripción general de los enfoques pedagógicos en los que han basado el marco, a saber:

 Orientación a la aplicación: de arriba hacia abajo en lugar de hacia abajo, su objetivo no es enseñar competencias específicas (por ejemplo, programación), sino desarrollar interés, pensamiento crítico y CT.

 Del consumidor al productor: los estudiantes comienzan como usuarios de un artefacto al usarlo / estudiarlo, luego modificarlo y posiblemente crearlo desde cero (use-modify-create)

 Ejemplos trabajados: declaración del problema y un procedimiento para resolver el problema

Nueva Zelanda Computer science unplugged: School students doing real computing without computers.

Bell, T., Alexander, J., Freeman, I., & Grimley, M. (2009).

A case study of the introduction of computer science in NZ schools.

Bell, T., Andreae, P., & Robins, A. (2014)

 

A pilot computer science and programming course for primary school students

Duncan, C., & Bell, T. (2015, November)..

Adoption of new computer science high school standards by New Zealand teachers.

Thompson, D., & Bell, T. (2013, November).

Reseñados en Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

En Nueva Zelanda, hay un  Certificado Nacional de Secundaria que incluye Ciencias de la Computación entendidas en el sentido de PC. Desde 2011 hay un curriculum para la Secundaria en este sentido que está ampliamente documentado por Duncan and Bell (2015) Bell et al. (2014), Thompson, D., & Bell, T. (2013, November). Así pues Nueva Zelanda introdujo PC como un tema evaluado a nivel nacional en 2011. Constituye una asignatura impartida en tres años. Utilizan Scratch como una introducción inicial a la programación y los conceptos antes de pasar a la programación orientada a objetos en los próximos años. Se llevó a cabo un estudio piloto en 2014 en el que a más de 500 estudiantes de 11/12 años se les enseñaron conceptos de representación de datos utilizando CS Unplugged y luego programación usando Scratch. CS Unplegged es un programa formativo centrado en PC, y muy completo. CS Unplegged es un programa completo de actividades desarrollado por CS ducation Research Group (http://cosc.canterbury.ac.nz/research/RG/CSE/) en la Universidad de Canterbury, Nueva Zelanda (http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/ ), Está explicado por Bell et al (2009) y por James Lockwood y Aidan Mooney.

CS Unplugged (http://csunplugged.org/) es una colección de actividades de aprendizaje gratuitas que enseñan Ciencias de la Computación a través de interesantes juegos y acertijos, que usan tarjetas, cuerdas, lápices de colores y muchos juegos como los de Ikea o Montesori-Amazon, del tipo de los que explicamos en el artículo de referencia de este trabajo (Zapata-Ros, 2015). Fue desarrollado para que los jóvenes estudiantes puedan interactuar con la informática, experimentar los tipos de preguntas y desafíos que experimentan los científicos informáticos, pero sin tener que aprender primero la programación.

Bell et al. (2009) son ​​los investigadores responsables del proyecto CS Unplugged y en este documento, dan una visión general inicial del proyecto y también exploran por qué se ha popularizado y describen las diferentes formas en que se ha adaptado, que son

Videos de diferentes actividades

Hacer pulseras codificadas en binario

Competiciones

Adaptar las actividades de CS Unplugged a diferentes temas del currículo.

Actividades al aire libre

Actividad en línea

También analizan y justifican los principios de aprendizaje al diseñar las actividades y discuten sus planes futuros

DISSECT (DIScover SciEnce through CT) Project

EE UU

[57] Nesiba, N., Pontelli, E. and Staley, T., 2015, October. DISSECT: Exploring the relationship between computational thinking and English literature in K-12 curricula. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2015. 32614 2015. IEEE (pp. 1- 8). IEEE.

[58] Arraki, K., Blair, K., Bürgert, T., Greenling, J., Haebe, J., Lee, G., Peel, A., Szczepanski, V., Pontelli, E. and Hug, S., 2014, October. DISSECT: An experiment in infusing computational thinking in K-12 science curricula. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2014 IEEE (pp. 1-9). IEEE.

[59] Burgett, T., Folk, R., Fulton, J., Peel, A., Pontelli, E. and Szczepanski, V., 2015, October. DISSECT: Analysis of pedagogical techniques to integrate computational thinking into K-12 curricula. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2015. 32614 2015. IEEE (pp. 1-9). IEEE.

 

Reseñado en Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

Como en los casos anteriores de EE UU, ésta corresponde a una iniciativa de Secundaria que tiene repercusión en las actividades curriculares de K-12 DISSECT es una iniciativa de la Universidad Estatal de Nuevo México, EE. UU. Para incorporar CT en las aulas de 6º grado. Para hacer esto, utilizan una variedad de diferentes técnicas y herramientas, incluyendo la escritura de algoritmos y Scratch.

Utilizaron Scratch para reforzar las habilidades de PC y los conceptos que se enseñaban anteriormente en otros módulos. También lo usaron para enseñar el concepto de iteración al hacer “Anuncios Web” y concluyeron que era un módulo atractivo que permitía a los estudiantes demostrar sus conocimientos de iteración.

El análisis empírico evidenció que este modelo mejoró el vocabulario de PC y las habilidades para definir términos y conceptos.

El análisis cualitativo también mostró que los estudiantes tenían una comprensión más completa de los conceptos de PC enseñados y sugieren que podrían no solo reconocer los conceptos sino también reutilizarlos en asignaturas y disciplinas distintas. También indicó que los niveles de compromiso y aprendizaje en los conceptos del currículo de ciencias del 6º grado incorporados en sus módulos eran más altos y que los módulos aumentaban efectivamente el interés, la motivación y el conocimiento de Computación.

Foundations for Advancing Computational Thinking (FACT)

EE UU

California

Assessing computational learning in K-12.

Grover, S., Cooper, S., & Pea, R. (2014, June).

Factors influencing computer science learning in middle school.

Grover, S., Pea, R., & Cooper, S. (2016, February).

 

Grover, S., Pea, R., & Cooper, S. (2015). Designing for deeper learning in a blended computer science course for middle school students. Computer Science Education, 25(2), 199-237.

 

Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

Como en los casos anteriores de EE UU, ésta corresponde a una iniciativa de Secundaria que tiene repercusión en las actividades curriculares de K-12 Grover et. Al (2014,2015,2016) desarrollaron un plan de estudios llamado FACT que les enseñaron a los estudiantes de secundaria. Utilizaron Scratch como su principal herramienta de enseñanza y enseñaron temas tales como bucles, variables, entrada del usuario, algoritmos y condicionales.

Descubrieron que su curso mostraba mejoras en el aprendizaje y fomentaba las habilidades de TC, tal como lo midieron los instrumentos previos y posteriores a la prueba tomados de trabajos anteriores en Israel (Zur-Bargury, I., Pârv, B. and Lanzberg, D., 2013, July.), así como cuestionarios y tareas de Scratch. Descubrieron que su curso (24 horas durante aproximadamente seis semanas) no arrojó resultados estadísticamente mejores que el curso israelí de 60 horas impartido durante un año, sin embargo, hay otros factores que contribuyen como que los estudiantes israelíes son escogidos como aquellos “que sobresalió en su grupo de edad “. Una pregunta en la encuesta que produjo resultados significativamente diferentes incluyó rellenar 10 bloques de Scratch en blanco en un guión y esto implicó el más alto nivel de pensamiento, “Evaluar y Crear” en la taxonomía de Bloom. También descubrieron que los estudiantes que tenían un bajo rendimiento matemático previo luchaban por aprender conceptos de CS y sugieren que apunta a la necesidad de desarrollar habilidades de abstracción para las cuales las matemáticas preparan a los estudiantes.

 

Además de lo reseñado hay seguramente hay otras iniciativas igualmente interesantes, y constituye un desafío indagarlas y ver las soluciones que aportan a la integración del Pensamiento Computacional. Así por ejemplo en el trabajo de Caspersen y Nowack  (2013)  se señalan las siguientes, iniciativas, obtenidas a su vez de Cutts, Esper y Simon (2011), aunque posiblemente hayan quedado algunas de ellas desfasadas en sus planteamientos[1]:

Informe Computing in School (Royal Society, 2012) de la Royal Society del Reino Unido.

La Fundación Nacional de Ciencias de EE. UU. y el College Board respaldan el desarrollo de un curso de Advanced Placement, basado en los principios del PC (Astrachan et al., 2012) , con el objetivo de ampliar la participación en informática y ciencias de la computación mediante la transformación de la informática de la escuela secundaria (Astrachan et al., 2011).

Citan también iniciativas en otros países

Israel (Gal-Ezer y Harel 1998 y 1999, Bargury 2012)

Alemania (Steer y Hubwieser 2010)

Países Bajos (Van Diepen y otros, 2011)

Noruega (Hadjerrouit 2009)

Referencias.-

 

Arraki, K., Blair, K., Bürgert, T., Greenling, J., Haebe, J., Lee, G., Peel, A., Szczepanski, V., Pontelli, E. and Hug, S. (2014, October). DISSECT: An experiment in infusing computational thinking in K-12 science curricula. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2014 IEEE (pp. 1-9). IEEE.

Baker, M., Hansen, T., Joiner, R., & Traum, D. (1999). The role of grounding in collaborative learning tasks. In P. Dillenbourg (Ed.), Collaborative Learning: Cognitive and Computational Approaches. (pp. 31-63; 223-225). Elsevier Science.http://www.uio.no/studier/emner/matnat/ifi/TOOL5100/v08/leseliste/F9/baker99role.pdf

Balanskat, A.  & Engelhardt , K. (October, 2014). Computing our future Computer programming and coding – Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe.  European Schoolnet (EUN Partnership AISBL) http://www.eun.org/c/document_library/get_file?uuid=521cb928-6ec4-4a86-b522-9d8fd5cf60ce&groupId=43887

Balanskat, A.  & Engelhardt , K. (October, 2015). Computing our future Computer programming and coding – Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe.  European Schoolnet (EUN Partnership AISBL)

Bargury, I. Z., Muller, O., Haberman, B., Zohar, D., Cohen, A., Levy, D., & Hotoveli, R. (2012, October). Implementing a new computer science curriculum for middle school in Israel. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2012 (pp. 1-6). IEEE. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/6462365/   y   https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Dalit_Levy/publication/261196400_Implementing_a_new_Computer_Science_Curriculum_for_middle_school_in_Israel/links/5605989108ae8e08c08c9079/Implementing-a-new-Computer-Science-Curriculum-for-middle-school-in-Israel.pdf en abierto.

Bawden, D. (2001). Information and digital literacies: a review of concepts. Journal of Documentation, 57(2), 218–259.

Bawden, D. (2008). Origins and concepts of digital literacy. Digital literacies: Concepts, policies and practices, 17-32. http://sites.google.com/site/colinlankshear/DigitalLiteracies.pdf#page=19

Bell, T., Alexander, J., Freeman, I., & Grimley, M. (2009). Computer science unplugged: School students doing real computing without computers. The New Zealand Journal of Applied Computing and Information Technology13(1), 20-29. http://www.computingunplugged.org/sites/default/files/papers/Unplugged-JACIT2009submit.pdf

Bell, T., Andreae, P., & Robins, A. (2014). A case study of the introduction of computer science in NZ schools. ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE)14(2), 10. https://ir.canterbury.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10092/10570/12652431_NZ-case-study-TOCE-v5.pdf?sequence=1  y  https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2602485

Bergin, J. (2008) Pedagogical Patterns Project [en línea]. Disponible en: http://www.pedagogicalpatterns.org/

Blikstein,  (2013). Seymour Papert’s Legacy: Thinking About Learning, and Learning About Thinking. https://tltl.stanford.edu/content/seymour-papert-s-legacy-thinking-about-learning-and-learning-about-thinking

Bono, E. D. (1968). New think: the use of lateral thinking in the generation of new ideas. Basic Books.

Bono, E. D. (1970). Lateral Thinking. A Textbook of Creativity. Londres: Ward Lock Educational.

Bono, E. DE (1986):El pensamiento lateral: manual de creatividad. Editorial Paidós.

Bloom, B.S. (1984). The 2 Sigma Problem: The Search for Methods of Group Instruction as ffective as One-to-One Tutoring, Educational Researcher, 13:6 (4-16). http://www.comp.dit.ie/dgordon/Courses/ILT/ILT0004/TheTwoSigmaProblem.pdf

Bocconi, S. et al (2016). Developing Computational Thinking in Compulsory Education. Implications for policy and practice.   http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/bitstream/JRC104188/jrc104188_computhinkreport.pdf

Burgett, T., Folk, R., Fulton, J., Peel, A., Pontelli, E. and Szczepanski, V. (2015, October). DISSECT: Analysis of pedagogical techniques to integrate computational thinking into K-12 curricula. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2015. 32614 2015. IEEE (pp. 1-9). IEEE.

Carvalho, T., Andrade, D., Silveira, J., Auler, V., Cavalheiro, S., Aguiar, M., Foss, L., Pernas, A. and Reiser, R., 2013, October. Discussing the challenges related to deployment of computational thinking in brazilian basic education. In Theoretical Computer Science (WEIT), 2013 2nd Workshop-School on (pp. 111-115). IEEE. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Marilton_Aguiar/publication/268240422_Discussing_the_Challenges_Related_to_Deployment_of_Computational_Thinking_in_Brazilian_Basic_Education/links/54abd8080cf2bce6aa1dbf62.pdf y http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/6778575/

Caspersen, M. E., & Nowack, P. (2013, January). Computational thinking and practice: A generic approach to computing in Danish high schools. In Proceedings of the Fifteenth Australasian Computing Education Conference-Volume 136 (pp. 137-143). Australian Computer Society, Inc. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2667214 y en abierto http://cs.au.dk/~mic/publications/conference/41–ace2013.pdf

Chambers, J. (2015). Inside Singapore’s plans for robots in pre-schools. GovInsider. Retrieved from: https://govinsider.asia/smart-gov/exclusive-singapore-puts-robots-in-pre-schools/

Chiprianov, V., & Gallon, L. (2016, July). Introducing Computational Thinking to K-5 in a French Context. In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (pp. 112-117). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2899439

Coffield, F., Moseley, D., Hall, E., Ecclestone, K. (2004). Learning Styles and Pedagogy in Post-16 Learning: A systematic and critical review. www.LSRC.ac.uk: Learning and Skills Research Centre. Retrieved from: http://www.lsda.org.uk/files/PDF/1543.pdf

Constantinidou, F., Baker, S. (2002). Stimulus modality and verbal learning performance in normal aging. Brain and Language, 82(3), 296-311.

Corballis, M. C. (2007). Pensamiento recursivo. Mente y cerebro, 27, 78-87. http://amscimag.sigmaxi.org/4Lane/ForeignPDF/2007-05CorballisSpanish.pdf

Corballis, M. C. (2014). The recursive mind: The origins of human language, thought, and civilization. Princeton University Press. http://press.princeton.edu/titles/9424.html

 

DeLano, D.E. y  Rising, L. (1997).  Introducing Technology into the Workplace. Proceedings  PLoP’97 Conference. Consultado en http://hillside.net/plop/plop97/Proceedings/delano.pdf

Dillenbourg, P. (1999). What do you mean by collaborative learning?.Collaborative-learning: Cognitive and Computational Approaches., 1-19. https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/file/index/docid/190240/filename/Dillenbourg-Pierre-1999.pdf

Dorn, R. I. (December, 2016) Computer Science K–12 Learning Standards Adoption Statement. http://www.k12.wa.us/ComputerScience/pubdocs/ComputerScienceStandards.pdf

Duncan, C., & Bell, T. (2015, November). A pilot computer science and programming course for primary school students. In Proceedings of the Workshop in Primary and Secondary Computing Education (pp. 39-48). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2818328

Eggleston, J. (1982). Sociología del currículum. Ed. Troquel. Buenos Aires.

Eshet, Y. (2002). Digital literacy: A new terminology framework and its application to the design of meaningful technology-based learning environments, In P. Barker and S. Rebelsky (Eds.), Proceedings of the World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecomunications, 493–498 Chesapeake VA: AACE, Retrieved November 30, 2007, from http://infosoc.haifa.ac.il/DigitalLiteracyEshet.doc

Eshet-Alkalai, Y. (2004), Digital literacy: a conceptual framework for survival skills in the digital era, Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 139(1), 93–106. Available at: http://www.openu.ac.il/Personal_sites/download/Digital-literacy2004-JEMH.pdf

Fitch, T., Hauser, M. & Chomsky, N.  2005.  The evolution of the language faculty:      Clarifications and implications.   Cognition. 97.179-210

Fricke, A. y Voelter, M. (2000). SEMINARS: A Pedagogical Pattern Language about teaching seminars, [en línea]. Proceding EuroPLoP 2000. Disponible en: http://www.voelter.de/publications/seminars.html [2008, 2 diciembre].

Gilster, P. (1997). Digital literacy. New York: Wiley.

Gordon, W. J. (1961). Synectics: The development of creative capacity.

Grover, S., Cooper, S., & Pea, R. (2014, June). Assessing computational learning in K-12. In Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Innovation & technology in computer science education (pp. 57-62). ACM. https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/41163349/Assessing_computational_learning_in_K-1220160114-23479-hj8516.pdf

Grover, S., Pea, R., & Cooper, S. (2016, February). Factors influencing computer science learning in middle school. In Proceedings of the 47th ACM technical symposium on computing science education (pp. 552-557). ACM.  http://life-slc.org/docs/LSLC_rp_A211_Grover-Pea-Cooper-SIGSCE2016.pdf

Grover, S., Pea, R., & Cooper, S. (2015). Designing for deeper learning in a blended computer science course for middle school students. Computer Science Education25(2), 199-237. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08993408.2015.1033142 y https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/4f37/83f96f0c4aa579d5eea160ff56c15f5e7c85.pdf

Hauser, M., Chomsky, N.,  & Fitch, T.  2002.  The faculty of language: what is it, who has it, and how did it evolve. Science 198. 1569-79

Hackenberg, A. J. (2007). Units coordination and the construction of improper fractions: A revision of the splitting hypothesis. Journal of Mathematical Behavior, 26(1), 27–47.

Hansen, T., Dirckinck-Holmfeld, L., Lewis, R., & Rugelj, J. (1999). Using telematics to support collaborative knowledge construction. Collaborative learning: Cognitive and computational approaches, 169-196.http://www.researchgate.net/publication/228559912_Using_telematics_to_support_collaborative_knowledge_construction/file/60b7d523962ffc2db3.pdf

Hayman-Abello SE, Warriner EM (2002). (2002). Child clinical/pediatric neuropsychology: some recent advances. Annual review of psychology,53(1), 309-339.

Himanen, P. (2002). La ética del hacker y el espíritu de la era de la información.http://eprints.rclis.org/12851/

IDA Singapore. (2015). IDA supports preschool centres with technology-enabled toys to build creativity and confidence in learning. Retrieved from: https://www.ida.gov.sg/About-Us/Newsroom/Media-Releases/ 2015/IDA-supports-preschool-centres-with-technology-enabled-toys-to-build-creativity-andconfidence-in-learning.

Jenkins, J.T., Jerkins, J.A. and Stenger, C.L. (2012), March. A plan for immediate immersion of computational thinking into the high school math classroom through a partnership with the alabama math, science, and technology initiative. In Proceedings of the 50th Annual Southeast Regional Conference (pp. 148-152). ACM.

Jovanov, M., Stankov, E., Mihova, M., Ristov, S., & Gusev, M. (2016, April). Computing as a new compulsory subject in the Macedonian primary schools curriculum. In Global Engineering Education Conference (EDUCON), 2016 IEEE (pp. 680-685). IEEE. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/7474623/

Keefe, J.W. (1979) Learning style: An overview. NASSP’s Student learning styles: Diagnosing and proscribing programs (pp. 1-17). Reston, VA. National Association of Secondary School Principles..

Koch, T., & Denike, K. (2009). Crediting his critics’ concerns: Remaking John Snow’s map of Broad Street cholera, 1854. Social science & medicine69(8), 1246-1251.http://www.albany.edu/faculty/fboscoe/papers/koch2009.pdf

Lanham, R.A. (1995). Digital literacy, Scientifi c American, 273(3), 160–161.

Lankshear, C. and Knobel, M. (2006). Digital literacies: policy, pedagogy and research considerations for education. Digital Kompetanse: Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, 1(1), 12–24.

Leeder, D., Boyle, T., Morales, R., Wharrad, H., & Garrud, P. (2004). To boldly GLO-towards the next generation of Learning Objects. In World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (Vol. 2004, No. 1, pp. 28-33).

Liu, J., Hasson, E. P., Barnett, Z. D., & Zhang, P. (2011, October). A survey on computer science K-12 outreach: teacher training programs. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2011 (pp. T4F-1). IEEE. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/6143111/

Lockwood, J., & Mooney, A. (2017). Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it Fit? A systematic literary review. arXiv preprint arXiv:1703.07659.

Mack, N. K. (2001). Building on informal knowledge through instruction in a complex content domain: Partitioning, units, and understanding multiplication of fractions. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 32(3), 267–296.

 

Marzano, R.J. (1998). A theory-based meta-analysis of research on instruction. Mid-continent Regional Educational Laboratory, Aurora, CO.

Merrill, D. (2000). Instructional Strategies and Learning Styles: Which takes Precedence? Trends and Issues in Instructional Technology, R. Reiser and J. Dempsey (Eds.). Prentice Hall.

Merrill, M. D. (2009). First principles of instruction. In C. M. Reigeluth & A. A. Carr-Chellman (Eds.), Instructional-design theories and models: Building a common knowledge base (Vol. III, pp. 41-56). New York: Routledge.

Mensing, K., Mak, J., Bird, M., & Billings, J. (2013, October). Computational, model thinking and computer coding for US Common Core Standards with 6 to 12 year old students. In Emerging eLearning Technologies and Applications (ICETA), 2013 IEEE 11th International Conference on (pp. 17-22). IEEE.

Miller, R. B., Kelly, G. N., & Kelly, J. T. (1988). Effects of Logo computer programming experience on problem solving and spatial relations ability. Contemporary Educational Psychology13(4), 348-357. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0361476X88900343

Mooney, A., Duffin, J., Naughton, T., Monahan, R., Power, J. and Maguire, P. (2014). PACT: An initiative to introduce computational thinking to second-level education in Ireland.

Nesiba, N., Pontelli, E. and Staley, T., (2015, October). DISSECT: Exploring the relationship between computational thinking and English literature in K-12 curricula. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2015. 32614 2015. IEEE (pp. 1- 8). IEEE.

Olive, J., & Vomvoridi, E. (2006). Making sense of instruction on fractions when a student lacks necessary fractional schemes: The case of Tim. Journal of Mathematical Behavior 25(1), 18–45.

Raja, T. (2014). We can code it!. http://www.motherjones.com/media/2014/06/computer-science-programming-code-diversity-sexism-education.

Ribeiro, L., Nunes, D.J., Da Cruz, M.K. and Matos, E.D.S., 2013, October. Computational Thinking: Possibilities and Challenges. In Theoretical Computer Science (WEIT), 2013 2nd Workshop-School on (pp. 22-25). IEEE.  http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/6778560/ y http://www.computacional.com.br/arquivos/Gerais/RIBEIRO%20-%20Computational%20Thinking%20-%20Possibilities%20and%20Challenges.pdf

Sentance, S., Dorling, M., & McNicol, A. (2013, February). Computer science in secondary schools in the UK: Ways to empower teachers. In International Conference on Informatics in Schools: Situation, Evolution, and Perspectives (pp. 15-30). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/44b0/074bd6fc438a459638f029667ff1ff79d9dd.pdf en abierto y https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-36617-8_2

Silva, R. (2014). START CODING THIS YEAR IT’S EASIER THAN YOU THINK. http://yearofcode.org/

Steffe, L. P., & Olive, J. (2010). Children’s fractional knowledge. Springer: New York.

Steffe, L. P. (2004). On the construction of learning trajectories of children: The case of commensurate fractions. Mathematical Thinking and Learning, 6(2), 129–162

Steffen, J. H. (2008). Optimal boarding method for airline passengers. Journal of Air Transport Management14(3), 146-150. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969699708000239

Stewart, K.L., Felicetti, L.A. (1992). Learning styles of marketing majors. Educational Research Quarterly, 15(2), 15-23.

Sullivan, A., & Bers, M. U. (2015). Robotics in the early childhood classroom: Learning outcomes from an 8-week robotics curriculum in pre-kindergarten through second grade. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi:10.1007/s10798-015-9304-5.

Sullivan, A., & Bers, M. U. (2017). Dancing robots: integrating art, music, and robotics in Singapore’s early childhood centers. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 1-22.https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10798-017-9397-0

Sysło, M. M., & Kwiatkowska, A. B. (2015, September). Introducing a new computer science curriculum for all school levels in Poland. In International Conference on Informatics in Schools: Situation, Evolution, and Perspectives (pp. 141-154). Springer, Cham. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-25396-1_13

Thompson, D., & Bell, T. (2013, November). Adoption of new computer science high school standards by New Zealand teachers. In Proceedings of the 8th Workshop in Primary and Secondary Computing Education (pp. 87-90). ACM. https://itp.nz/files/wipsce-teachers-2013.pdf y https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2532759

Thompson-Schill, S., Kraemer, D., Rosenberg, L. (2009). Visual Learners Convert Words To Pictures In The Brain And Vice Versa, Says Psychology Study. University of Pennsylvania. News article retrieved from http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/news/visual-learners-convert-words-pictures-brain-and-vice-versa-says-penn-psychology-study

Valverde-Berrocoso, J., Fernández-Sánchez, M.R., Garrido-Arroyo, M.C. (2015). El pensamiento computacional y las nuevas ecologías del aprendizaje. RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia. Número 46. Número monográfico sobre «Pensamiento Computacional». Septiembre de 2015. Consultado el (dd/mm/aa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/46

Washington, US Congress of Technology Assessment, OTA CIT-235 (April 1984). Computerized Manufacturing Automation: Employment, Education and the Workplace, page 234. http://ota-cdn.fas.org/reports/8408.pdf

Werner, L., Denner, J., Campe, S., & Kawamoto, D. C. (2012, February). The fairy performance assessment: measuring computational thinking in middle school. In Proceedings of the 43rd ACM technical symposium on Computer Science Education(pp. 215-220). ACM. https://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/courses/compsci747s2c/lectures/wernerFairyComputationalThinkingAssessment.pdf   y   https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2157200

Wilkins, J. L. M., & Norton, A. (2011). The splitting loope. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 42(4), 386–416

Wilkins, J. L., Norton, A., & Boyce, S. J. (2013). Validating a Written Instrument for Assessing Students’ Fractions Schemes and Operations. Mathematics Educator, 22(2), 31-54.

Wing, J.M. (March 2006). Computational Thinking. It represents a universally applicable attitude and skill set everyone, not just computer scientists, would be eager to learn and use. COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM /Vol. 49, No. 3. https://www.cs.cmu.edu/~15110-s13/Wing06-ct.pdf

 

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia. Número 46.  15 de Septiembre de 2015. Consultado el (dd/mm/aa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/46

Zur-Bargury, I. (2012, July). A new curriculum for junior-high in computer science. In Proceedings of the 17th ACM annual conference on Innovation and technology in computer science education (pp. 204-208). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2325347

Zur-Bargury, I., Pârv, B., & Lanzberg, D. (2013, July). A nationwide exam as a tool for improving a new curriculum. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM conference on Innovation and technology in computer science education (pp. 267-272). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2462479.

 

[1] Las referencias se pueden encontrar en el trabajo de Caspersen y Nowack  (2013)

 

 

Pensamiento computacional. Una tercera competencia clave (VIII). Iniciativas institucionales en educación formal: B Educación Primaria.

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Alcalá

Ésta es la octava entrada de una serie que, en conjunto, constituirán un capítulo de un libro que será  publicado por la editorial de la Universidad Católica de Santa María de Arequipa (Perú) con el título “El pensamiento computacional: La nueva alfabetización de las culturas digitales”.

En las anteriores entradas se han planteado distintas cuestiones: que el pensamiento computacional  debe constituir una tercera competencia clave dentro del curriculum escolar, qué son las alfabetizaciones y las culturas digitales , una definición de Pensamiento Computacional, cuáles son las habilidades y procedimientos que lo constituyen y en qué fases de la elaboración de un código intervienen y unas conclusiones de carácter general. En las tres últimas entregas, la segunda a de las cuales es ésta, reseñamos las que se consideran experiencias y prácticas más notables de integración del Pensamiento Computacional, con el sentido expuesto, dentro del curriculum oficial o con repercusión en él.

 

Iniciativas institucionales en educación formal de Educación Primaria relacionadas con pensamiento computacional

En el comienzo de la entrada anterior señalábamos diversas fuentes de donde obteníamos estos datos:

Básicamente del informe Computing our future Computer programming and coding Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe, versiones de 2014 (Balanskat & Engelhardt, October, 2014) y de 2015 (Balanskat & Engelhardt, October, 2015), el trabajo también de la Unión Europea (Bocconi et al, 2016) Developing Computational Thinking in Compulsory Education. Implications for policy and practice y la investigación, en preprint de ArXiv, de Lockwood & Mooney (2017) Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it Fit? A systematic literary review.

En ellos hemos podido constatar la existencia de iniciativas en el marco de la educación formal, promovidas por instituciones o por profesores, individualmente o en grupos, asociaciones, etc., pero siempre con reconocimiento y con repercusión en la acreditación y en la certificación de estudios formales.

Es importante enfatizar qué entendemos por iniciativas relacionadas con el Pensamiento Computacional: Son las que promueven un conjunto de competencias que, si bien son útiles y son utilizadas por los programadores en la elaboración de los códigos, sobre todo son útiles a los individuos en general, en otros contextos que no son los informáticos, para resolver problemas en su vida personal o profesional. O que en general constituyen o forman parte de métodos eficaces para trabajar en otras ciencias, técnicas o servicios, o para resolver problemas en sus respectivos ámbitos de conocimientos y con los objetivos que tienen atribuidos.

No tendremos en cuenta pues los casos de la inclusión de la programación pura y simple, la que sirve para hacer programas informáticos, en los currículos o en los sistemas formales de enseñanza. Por eso hemos excluido los casos de España o de muchos países de la UE que sí están contenplados en los informes Computing our future Computer programming and coding Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe.Aunque el debate sobre este particular está abierto, como lo hemos reseñado en el apartado “El primer dilema del Pensamiento Computacional”.

En la relación que sigue, podemos observar que hay situaciones muy consolidadas y muy potentes como pueda ser la del Reino Unido, junto con otras que o bien son institucionales y no han redundado en una práctica más o menos generalizada pero han sido recogidas por normativas reflejadas en el boletín oficial, o simplemente que hemos visto que hay constancia de ellas:

Primaria
País Referencia Situación en el contexto del curriculum y del sistema educativo oficial Características en relación con la clasificación que hemos determinado (programación sólo / desarrollo de competencias específicas como área transversal) Cuáles de los elementos definidos se pueden detectar
UK- Inglaterra Curriculum Nacional

Orientación legal

Currículo nacional en Inglaterra: programas informáticos de estudio

Publicado el 11 de septiembre de 2013

 

Desarrollo de competencias específicas como área transversal Competencias específicas y competencias claves, reconocidas como tales, incluidas en el curriculum
UK- Escocia Curriculum escocés

 

Adoptan prácticamente uno similar al C.N. pero menos desarrollado Competencias específicas y competencias claves, reconocidas como tales, incluidas en el curriculum
UK-Gales e Irlanda del Norte Incorporan el curriculum nacional como curriculum galés o de Eire.

 

Adoptan el C.N.

Orientación legal

Currículo nacional en Inglaterra: programas informáticos de estudio

Publicado el 11 de septiembre de 2013

 

Competencias específicas y competencias claves, reconocidas como tales, incluidas en el curriculum
UK

Capacitación docente

Computer science in secondary schools in the UK: Ways to empower teachers.

Sentance, S., Dorling, M., & McNicol, A. (2013, February).

 

 

Reseñado en Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

Es una reflexión sobre las necesidades de formación docente que el PC plantea a partir de la situación creada en UK con el PC Los autores dicen que en Inglaterra y otras partes del Reino Unido, se ha asistido a una cantidad y de un alcance sin precedentes a cambios en la forma en que los planes de estudio cambian de un enfoque a otro en cómo se aprende con el uso de aplicaciones de software y a través de la introducción de la informática en las escuelas primarias y secundarias. En este documento describen algunos de los desafíos que enfrentamos, el progreso realizado en la integración de las CC y el apoyo brindado a los docentes en su desarrollo profesional. Pretenden como en otros casos apoyar a los docentes de una manera holística y proponen un modelo transformacional de desarrollo profesional para CC, tanto para maestros en servicio como formando la base de nuevos programas de capacitación docente.

Acompañan una investigación que describen:

Se distribuyó una encuesta a los maestros que deseaban asistir a cursos / capacitación de desarrollo profesional en CC. Concluyen que las áreas donde los docentes buscan apoyo son “orientación sobre las formas de enseñar informática” y la necesidad de recursos y herramientas.

También encontraron que los talleres de un día y el trabajo con un maestro experimentado eran el tipo de desarrollo más útil.

La administración de tiempos, y su consideración, fue el tema al que se dio más importancia con respecto a los maestros y a la voluntad de la escuela para participar en estos cambios.

Presentan algunos ejemplos de estos cursos de capacitación que incluyen Python School, Digital Schoolhouse y Computing at School Master Teachers.

Por último analizan dos temas a trabajar en el futuro: la acreditación y la investigación en la  acción.

EE UU CODE.ORG curriculum for elementary school (Introducing code studio for grades K-5)

 

En EE UU la educación primaria (Elementary School o K-5) está regulada por las autoridades locales. CODE.org es una iniciativa privada sin ánimo de lucro que tiene establecido un curriculum compatible con el que tiene la administración nacional para Secundaria (K-12) y que también contiene directrices para primaria. En este documento están los contenidos y criterios para organizar la programación (code) en Primaria (Elementary School) por Code.org
EE UU Estándares de CSTA.

Computer Science K–12 Learning Standards Adoption Statement

Dorn, R. I. (December, 2016).

 

Son las directrices de la Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) aprobadas por la administración nacional de EE UU. Establecen los princios genéricos a tener en cuenta para integrar el pensamiento Computacional de EE UU en K-12 (Secundaria). Pero contiene también directrices para Primaria (Elementary School)
EE UU Common Core

Iniciativa del Distrito Escolar Unificado Paradise Valley (PVUSD) para enseñar la codificación a los estudiantes de K-8, y el pensamiento computacional / modelo requerido a través de las actividades de CCSS y planes de lecciones. Tres maestros de Educación Dotados (1 ° / 2 °, 3 ° / 4 °, 5 ° / 6 ° año) y el Director de Tecnología de la Información la articulan

Tras el acceso a la presidencia de Trump, o más bien tras la paralización de hecho, de lo que sólo fue expuesto como directrices por la administración Obama y por el CSTA, el panorama queda reducido a iniciativas aisladas como es la Iniciativa del Distrito Escolar Unificado Paradise Valley (PVUSD), en el contexto del Common Core de otras materias de Lengua o de Matemáticas Competencias instrumentales en el contexto del Common Core: Se evidencia que el pensamiento computacional y su modelo pueden llevar a una práctica de uso de codificación donde se pueden incorporar muchos de los cambios necesarios para el aprendizaje de los estándares de ELA y matemáticas (Mensing, K. et al, 2013, October)
EE UU Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

Se presentan numerosos casos en los que se identifican y describen elementos de pensamiento computacional que sirven de apoyo a materias y a destrezas del curriculum La estructura y el tratamiento es muy común se trata de una formación transversal y su experimentación en destrezas del curriculum, como son matemáticas, lenguaje, conocimiento del medio, etc. Se aíslan y determinan elementos del PC como pueden ser

1) Abstracción

2) Tratamiento de datos

3) Gestión de recursos y herramientas informáticas

4) Algoritmos

5) Diseño

6) Evaluación

7) Visualización y representación de datos.

Frecuentemente va acompañado de una materia con contenidos que favorecen el aprendizaje y el trabajo tal como se hace en programación, suele ser de un lenguaje.

Irlanda Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

PACT: An initiative to introduce computational thinking to second-level education in Ireland. Mooney et al (2014).

Numerosas iniciativas transversales. Ninguna en el curriculum estatal.

En la República de Irlanda, como en muchos otros países, la Ciencia de la Computación o la Informática todavía no es un tema que los estudiantes pueden realizar un examen estatal. Aunque se han tomado medidas para incluirlo, hasta ahora, todo lo que está disponible para los estudiantes en el currículum es un curso corto de programación

Como ejemplo y formando parte de este movimiento, los investigadores del Departamento de Ciencias de la Computación de la Universidad de Maynooth, Irlanda, diseñaron el programa PACT. PACT es un acrónimo de Programming ^ Algorithms = Computational Thinking. La esperanza era presentar a los estudiantes y profesores de secundaria irlandeses a la informática a través de programación y algoritmos, con la esperanza de mejorar la habilidad vital de CT en los estudiantes participantes.

El programa incluye material en cinco unidades diferentes para enseñar a los estudiantes del Año de Transición de Primaria a Secundaria. Estos fueron Programación 1, Programación 2, Algoritmos, Gráficos y Recursión.

Francia Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

Chiprianov & Gallon (2016, July). Introducing Computational Thinking to K-5 in a French Context. In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM

Francia ha tomado recientemente decisiones políticas para integrar CT Education (CTE) en el plan de estudios nacional obligatorio. En Primaria y en Secundaria. Asociaciones e institucionaes están elaborando propuestas de currículum.

Ésta es una propuesta de curriculum para Primaria.

En esta propuesta Chiprianov y Gallon (2016) presentan un resumen de un proyecto para integrar PC en la educación primaria francesa. Ofrecen una visión general del estado actual del PC en Educación en Francia y hablan sobre el desarrollo cognitivo y afectivo del niño.

Discuten el marco teórico del currículum.

El nuevo plan de estudios francés incluyó la programación y está en línea con el estándar de la Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) (Dorn, R. I., December, 2016)), pero no incluye explícitamente Ciencias de la Computación. A continuación, ofrecen una descripción general de las herramientas y actividades que planean usar para enseñar PC, que incluye juegos (code.org) y robots. Además, dan una visión general de cómo llevarlo a la práctica, es decir, el desarrollo de 10 lecciones y dan algunas estrategias de enseñanza que por lo general coinciden con las siguientes:

 Discusiones y demostraciones de toda la clase, seguidas por

 Aprendizaje colaborativo o individual, y finalmente

 Reflexionando sobre las soluciones y discutiendo estos

Por último, ofrecen una visión general de algunas conclusiones que obtuvieron, que incluyeron su creencia de que los maestros son importantes tanto para una actitud positiva como para adaptar los materiales a sus aulas. También encontraron que los niños adquirieron y aprendieron habilidades, como la ubicación del espacio, a partir de las tareas ejercitadas. Es la parte empírica del trabajo.

Macedonia Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

Jovanov, M., Stankov, E., Mihova, M., Ristov, S., & Gusev, M. (2016, April). Computing as a new compulsory subject in the Macedonian primary schools curriculum.

En este documento tenemos constancia de que la situación y los presupuestos de PC llevaron a los responsables políticos en Macedonia a incluir la programación como parte de una nueva asignatura obligatoria para los alumnos a la edad de 8 años. Jovanov, M., Stankov, E., Mihova, M., Ristov, S., & Gusev, M. (2016, April) en su documento e investigación se centran en el cambio citado en el currículo macedonio: la introducción del curso “Trabajo con computadoras y conceptos básicos de programación”, que en breve se denominará” Informática”en 2015. Presentan el plan de estudios propuesto y aceptado, con énfasis en los temas sobre pensamiento computacional y programación. También discuten el software disponible y las herramientas adecuadas para la implementación de los temas mencionados en la propuesta, y presentan un juego recientemente desarrollado. Al final explican la formación necesaria de los profesores,y el formato de la capacitación preliminar de todos los maestros de escuela primaria en el país. La investigación incluye las primeras impresiones de los capacitadores que realizaron la capacitación, y la elaboración de las opiniones de los maestros.

 

Jovanov et al. (2016) ofrecen una descripción general del contenido que incluye siete unidades que se impartirán en dos clases por semana:

 Primeros pasos para usar la computadora

 Gráficos por computadora

 Procesamiento de texto

 Vida en línea

 Concepto de algoritmos y programas

 Pensamiento computacional a través de un juego

 Creación de programas simples

Los últimos tres que se centran en PC. A los estudiantes se les enseña la noción de programación y aprenden a través de un juego que fue especialmente diseñado, el DigitMile, que está diseñado para ser utilizado en este plan de estudios junto con él. Finalmente, los estudiantes usan ScratchJr para desarrollar programas simples.

EE UU

California

Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

Miller, R. B., Kelly, G. N., & Kelly, J. T. (1988). Effects of Logo computer programming experience on problem solving and spatial relations ability

 

Experiencia muy antigua que no puede referenciarse a lo que tratamos en el estdo actual del PC, pero que James Lockwood y Aidan Mooney la incluyen en su estudio. Miller et al. [1988] presentan un estudio sobre la resolución de problemas y las relaciones espaciales de los estudiantes de quinto y sexto grado que tuvieron un año académico de experiencia usando Logo. Se utilizaron dos programas, The Factory y Teasers de Tobbs para evaluar la capacidad de resolución de problemas y relaciones espaciales mediante subtests del CTMM (Prueba de Madurez Mental de California: Nivel 1) y PMA (Grados de habilidades mentales primarias 2-4). Se describen los dos programas, así como los datos de los participantes. Los resultados mostraron que hubo una diferencia significativa entre el grupo de tratamiento y los grupos control tanto en las medidas de resolución de problemas como en una de las tres pruebas espaciales. Sin embargo, no se realizaron pruebas previas, por lo que no se puede probar que un grupo aprendió menos o más.
Brasil Discussing the challenges related to deployment of computational thinking in brazilian basic education.

Carvalho, T., Andrade, D., Silveira, J., Auler, V., Cavalheiro, S., Aguiar, M., Foss, L., Pernas, A. and Reiser, R. (2013, October).

y también aquí

 

Computational Thinking: Possibilities and Challenges.

Ribeiro, L., Nunes, D.J., Da Cruz, M.K. and Matos, E.D.S. (2013, October).

 

Reseñado en Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

En Brasil no existe una integración transversal o en el curriculum nacional o de otros niveles de enseñanzas de PC. Si embargo estos documentos son un claro avance en los trabajos previos para incluirlos Carvalho et al. (2013) presentan un documento sobre las dificultades en el despliegue de CT en educación, específicamente en su contexto de Educación Básica y Media Brasileña. Ofrecen una descripción general de CT, así como algunos ejemplos de otros cursos e iniciativas para promover CT en la educación. Presentan igualmente algunos desafíos que el sistema educativo brasileño plantea para la incorporación del CT. Estos son:

 Falta de infraestructura, es decir, falta de ordenadores

 ¿Reordenación del plan de estudios, es decir, qué contenidos nuevos deben incluir las disciplinas nuevs o ser incorporado en otras? Debido a la estructura de las instituciones educativas en Brasil, cualquiera de estos es posible ya que es un sistema bastante flexible

 Cualificación y antecedentes de los instructores, es decir, ¿se necesita un grado de informática adaptado o un nuevo perfil?

 Estrategias para diseminar CT, es decir, talleres, libros de texto, etc.

 

Riberiro et al. (2013) también analizan algunos desafíos y posibilidades para incluir el PC en las escuelas brasileñas.

Están de acuerdo con Carvalho et al. en que se necesitarían cambios curriculares y la capacitación de los educadores de Computación es vital. También citan las Políticas del Gobierno como un problema potencial y señalan que es importante que el gobierno cree grupos de trabajo para liderar la inclusión de PC en la educación. También concluyen que las personas y las tradiciones en el aprendizaje pueden ser reacias a incluir el PC, ya que pueden ser difícil de convencerles de que es una habilidad que es necesaria y todavía no poseen.

Nueva Zelanda Computer science unplugged: School students doing real computing without computers. 

Bell, T., Alexander, J., Freeman, I., & Grimley, M. (2009).

 

A case study of the introduction of computer science in NZ schools.

Bell, T., Andreae, P., & Robins, A. (2014)

aquí.

 

 

A pilot computer science and programming course for primary school students

Duncan, C., & Bell, T. (2015, November)..

y aquí.

 

Reseñados en Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

 

El programa CS Unplegged es un programa completo de actividades desarrollado por CS ducation Research Group  (http://cosc.canterbury.ac.nz/research/RG/CSE/) en la Universidad de Canterbury, Nueva Zelanda (http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/ ), Está explicado por Bell et al (2009) y por James Lockwood y Aidan Mooney.

Básicamente está orientado a Educación Secundaria e informa al  Certificado Nacional de Secundaria que incluye Ciencias de la Computación entendidas en el sentido de PC.

Pero esto implica actividades incluidas en el curriculum para etapas anteriores a partir de los cinco años.

CS Unplugged (http://csunplugged.org/) es una colección de actividades de aprendizaje gratuitas que enseñan Ciencias de la Computación a través de interesantes juegos y acertijos, que usan tarjetas, cuerdas, lápices de colores y muchos juegos como los de Ikea o Montesori-Amazon, del tipo de los que explicamos en el artículo de referencia de este trabajo (Zapata-Ros, 2015). Fue desarrollado para que los jóvenes estudiantes puedan interactuar con la informática, experimentar los tipos de preguntas y desafíos que experimentan los científicos informáticos, pero sin tener que aprender primero la programación.

Las actividades para las primeras etapas podemos verlas en https://www.csunplugged.org/en/topics/

Bell et al. (2009) son ​​los investigadores responsables del proyecto CS Unplugged y en este documento, dan una visión general inicial del proyecto y también exploran por qué se ha popularizado y describen las diferentes formas en que se ha adaptado, que son

Videos de diferentes actividades

Hacer pulseras codificadas en binario

Competiciones

Adaptar las actividades de CS Unplugged a diferentes temas del currículo.

Actividades al aire libre

Actividad en línea

También analizan y justifican los principios de aprendizaje al diseñar las actividades y discuten sus planes futuros

Singapur Sullivan, A., & Bers, M. U. (2017). Dancing robots: integrating art, music, and robotics in Singapore’s early childhood centers. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 1-22.

 

Programa piloto PlayMaker de Singapur.

Su objetivo es proporcionar ejemplos de éxitos y de áreas donde mejorar  el trabajo futuro en implementación de PC de los cuatro años en adelante. Estos ejemplos  se ofrecen como  resultados válidos, del año en el que se ha llevado a cabo la experiencia piloto del programa Playmaker de Singapur, que pueden ser útiles no solo para el trabajo futuro en este país, sino también en otros países que están desarrollando nuevos programas para la educación de la primera infancia.

Para abordar la creciente necesidad de nuevos programas de tecnología educativa (en este caso de PC a través fundamentalmente de robótica) en las aulas de la primera infancia, se lanzó el programa PlayMaker de Singapur. Es un programa en línea destinado a los maestros, para introducir a los niños más pequeños a la tecnología (Chambers 2015; Digital News Asia 2015). Según Steve Leonard, vicepresidente de la Autoridad de Desarrollo de Infocomm de Singapur (IDA), “a medida que Singapur se convierta en una nación inteligente, nuestros hijos necesitarán sentirse cómodos creando con tecnología” (IDA Singapur 2015).

Aprovechando el creciente movimiento STEAM, el objetivo del programa Playmaker no es solo promover el conocimiento técnico sino también brindar a los niños herramientas para divertirse, practicar la resolución de problemas y generar confianza y creatividad (Chambers 2015; Digital News Asia 2015).

Como parte del programa PlayMaker, 160 centros preescolares en Singapur fueron dotados de una variedad de juguetes tecnológicos que involucran a los niños con la robótica, la programación, la construcción y la ingeniería, incluyendo: BeeBot, Circuit Stickers y la robótica KIBO (Chambers 2015). Además del lanzamiento de nuevas herramientas, los educadores de la primera infancia también recibieron capacitación en un simposio de 1 día sobre cómo usar y enseñar con cada una de estas herramientas (Chambers 2015).

Estas escuelas piloto también reciben apoyo técnico continuo y asistencia con la integración curricular como parte de este enfoque integral (IDA Singapur 2015).

El estudio de referencia (Sullivan & Bers, 2017) se centra en evaluar los resultados de aprendizaje y compromiso de una de las herramientas de Playmaker implementadas: el kit de robótica KIBO. KIBO es un kit de construcción de robótica diseñado específicamente para niños de 4 a 7 años de edad para aprender habilidades básicas de ingeniería y programación (Sullivan y Bers 2015). Las características del kit KIBO y cómo se utilizó se describen en detalle en la sección ”Métodos’ del estudio’. Además de evaluar los conceptos técnicos que los niños dominan con KIBO, este estudio también examina el potencial de la robótica KIBO para promover conductas personales y sociales positivas en niños pequeños. Finalmente, describe la experiencia desde la perspectiva de los docentes.

Pensamiento computacional. Una tercera competencia clave (VII). Iniciativas institucionales en educación formal relacionadas con el pensamiento computacional: A Educación Infantil

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Alcalá

Ésta es la séptima entrada de una serie que, en conjunto, constituirán un capítulo de un libro que será  publicado por la editorial de la Universidad Católica de Santa María de Arequipa (Perú) con el título “El pensamiento computacional: La nueva alfabetización de las culturas digitales”.

En las anteriores entradas se han planteado distintas cuestiones: que el pensamiento computacional  debe constituir una tercera competencia clave dentro del curriculum escolar, qué son las alfabetizaciones y las culturas digitales , una definición de Pensamiento Computacional, cuáles son las habilidades y procedimientos que lo constituyen y en qué fases de la elaboración de un código intervienen y unas conclusiones de carácter general. En ésta última parte reseñamos las que se consideran experiencias y prácticas más notables de integración del Pensamiento Computacional, con el sentido expuesto, dentro del curriculum oficial o con repercusión en él.

 

 

Iniciativas institucionales en educación formal de Educación Infantil relacionadas con pensamiento computacional

En diversas fuentes, básicamente en el informe Computing our future Computer programming and coding Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe, versiones de 2014 (Balanskat & Engelhardt, October, 2014) y de 2015 (Balanskat & Engelhardt, October, 2015), el trabajo también de la Unión Europea (Bocconi et al, 2016) Developing Computational Thinking in Compulsory Education. Implications for policy and practice y la investigación, en preprint de ArXiv, de Lockwood & Mooney (2017) Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it Fit? A systematic literary review, hemos podido constatar la existencia de iniciativas en el marco de la educación formal, promovidas por instituciones o por profesores, individualmente o en grupos, asociaciones, etc., pero siempre con reconocimiento y con repercusión en la acreditación y en la certificación de estudios formales.

Es importante enfatizar qué entendemos por iniciativas relacionadas con el Pensamiento Computacional. Nos referimos a  aquellas que lo integran en el sentido que señala Wing, o en el que ponemos de relieve en este trabajo o en su precedente (Zapata-Ros, 2015). Es decir, las que promueven un conjunto de competencias que, si bien son útiles y son utilizadas por los programadores en la elaboración de los códigos, sobre todo son útiles a los individuos en general, en otros contextos que no son los informáticos, para resolver problemas en su vida personal o profesional. O que en general constituyen o forman parte de métodos eficaces para trabajar en otras ciencias, técnicas o servicios, o para resolver problemas en sus respectivos ámbitos de conocimientos y con los objetivos que tienen atribuidos.

No tendremos en cuenta pues los casos de la inclusión de la programación pura y simple, la que sirve para hacer programas informáticos, en los currículos o en los sistemas formales de enseñanza. Por eso hemos excluido los casos de España o de muchos países de la UE que sí están contenplados en los informes Computing our future Computer programming and coding Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe.Aunque el debate sobre este particular está abierto, como lo hemos reseñado en el apartado “El primer dilema del Pensamiento Computacional”.

Si volvemos a considerar los casos de integración del Pensamiento Compuacional en el sentido descrito, en la relación que sigue, podemos observar que hay situaciones muy consolidadas y muy potentes como pueda ser la del Reino Unido, y otras que o bien son institucionales y no han redundado en una práctica más o menos generalizada pero han sido recogidas por normativas reflejadas en el boletín oficial. O simplemente que hemos visto que hay constancia de ellas.

Veamos el cuadro de Educación Infantil:

Educación Infanti (Key stage 1 in UK)
País Referencia Situación en el contexto del curriculum y del sistema educativo oficial Características en relación con la clasificación que hemos determinado (programación sólo / desarrollo de competencias específicas como área transversal) Cuáles de los elementos definidos se pueden detectar
UK- Inglaterra Curriculum Nacional

Orientación legal

Currículo nacional en Inglaterra: programas informáticos de estudio

Publicado el 11 de septiembre de 2013

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-computing-programmes-of-study/national-curriculum-in-england-computing-programmes-of-study#key-stage-1

 

Desarrollo de competencias específicas como área transversal Competencias específicas y competencias claves, reconocidas como tales, incluidas en el curriculum
UK- Escocia Curriculum escocés

https://education.gov.scot/scottish-education-system/policy-for-scottish-education/policy-drivers/cfe-(building-from-the-statement-appendix-incl-btc1-5)/curriculum-areas/Technologies

Adoptan prácticamente uno similar al C.N. pero menos desarrollado Competencias específicas y competencias claves, reconocidas como tales, incluidas en el curriculum
UK-Gales e Irlanda del Norte Incorporan el curriculum nacional como curriculum galés o de Eire.

http://learning.gov.wales/resources/browse-all/digital-competence-framework/?lang=en

Adoptan el C.N.

Orientación legal

Currículo nacional en Inglaterra: programas informáticos de estudio

Publicado el 11 de septiembre de 2013

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-computing-programmes-of-study/national-curriculum-in-england-computing-programmes-of-study#key-stage-1

Competencias específicas y competencias claves, reconocidas como tales, incluidas en el curriculum
Nueva Zelanda Computer science unplugged: School students doing real computing without computers.

Bell, T., Alexander, J., Freeman, I., & Grimley, M. (2009). http://www.computingunplugged.org/sites/default/files/papers/Unplugged-JACIT2009submit.pdf

A case study of the introduction of computer science in NZ schools.

Bell, T., Andreae, P., & Robins, A. (2014)

https://ir.canterbury.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10092/10570/12652431_NZ-case-study-TOCE-v5.pdf?sequence=1  y  https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2602485

A pilot computer science and programming course for primary school students

Duncan, C., & Bell, T. (2015, November).. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2818328

Adoption of new computer science high school standards by New Zealand teachers.

Thompson, D., & Bell, T. (2013, November). https://itp.nz/files/wipsce-teachers-2013.pdf y https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2532759

 

Reseñados en Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it fit?

A systematic literary review

James Lockwood, Aidan Mooney.

https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1703/1703.07659.pdf

El programa CS Unplegged es un programa completo de actividades desarrollado por CS ducation Research Group  (http://cosc.canterbury.ac.nz/research/RG/CSE/) en la Universidad de Canterbury, Nueva Zelanda (http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/ ), Está explicado por Bell et al (2009) y por James Lockwood y Aidan Mooney.

Básicamente está orientado a Educación Secundaria e informa al  Certificado Nacional de Secundaria que incluye Ciencias de la Computación entendidas en el sentido de PC.

Pero esto implica actividades incluidas en el curriculum para etapas anteriores a partir de los cinco años.

CS Unplugged (http://csunplugged.org/) es una colección de actividades de aprendizaje gratuitas que enseñan Ciencias de la Computación a través de interesantes juegos y acertijos, que usan tarjetas, cuerdas, lápices de colores y muchos juegos como los de Ikea o Montesori-Amazon, del tipo de los que explicamos en el artículo de referencia de este trabajo (Zapata-Ros, 2015). Fue desarrollado para que los jóvenes estudiantes puedan interactuar con la informática, experimentar los tipos de preguntas y desafíos que experimentan los científicos informáticos, pero sin tener que aprender primero la programación.

Las actividades para las primeras etapas podemos verlas en https://www.csunplugged.org/en/topics/

Bell et al. (2009) son ​​los investigadores responsables del proyecto CS Unplugged y en este documento, dan una visión general inicial del proyecto y también exploran por qué se ha popularizado y describen las diferentes formas en que se ha adaptado, que son

Videos de diferentes actividades

Hacer pulseras codificadas en binario

Competiciones

Adaptar las actividades de CS Unplugged a diferentes temas del currículo.

Actividades al aire libre

Actividad en línea

También analizan y justifican los principios de aprendizaje al diseñar las actividades y discuten sus planes futuros

Singapur Sullivan, A., & Bers, M. U. (2017). Dancing robots: integrating art, music, and robotics in Singapore’s early childhood centers. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 1-22.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10798-017-9397-0

Programa piloto PlayMaker de Singapur.

Su objetivo es proporcionar ejemplos de éxitos y de áreas donde mejorar  el trabajo futuro en implementación de PC en primeras etapas. Estos ejemplos  se ofrecen como  resultados válidos de este año en el que se ha llevado a cabo la experiencia piloto del programa Playmaker de Singapur que puede ser útil no solo para el trabajo futuro en este país, sino también en otros países que están desarrollando nuevos programas para la educación de la primera infancia.

Para abordar la creciente necesidad de nuevos programas de tecnología educativa (en este caso de PC a través fundamentalmente de robótica) en las aulas de la primera infancia, se lanzó el programa PlayMaker de Singapur. Es un programa en línea destinado a los maestros, para introducir a los niños más pequeños a la tecnología (Chambers 2015; Digital News Asia 2015). Según Steve Leonard, vicepresidente de la Autoridad de Desarrollo de Infocomm de Singapur (IDA), “a medida que Singapur se convierta en una nación inteligente, nuestros hijos necesitarán sentirse cómodos creando con tecnología” (IDA Singapur 2015).

Aprovechando el creciente movimiento STEAM, el objetivo del programa Playmaker no es solo promover el conocimiento técnico sino también brindar a los niños herramientas para divertirse, practicar la resolución de problemas y generar confianza y creatividad (Chambers 2015; Digital News Asia 2015).

Como parte del programa PlayMaker, 160 centros preescolares en Singapur fueron dotados de una variedad de juguetes tecnológicos que involucran a los niños con la robótica, la programación, la construcción y la ingeniería, incluyendo: BeeBot, Circuit Stickers y la robótica KIBO (Chambers 2015). Además del lanzamiento de nuevas herramientas, los educadores de la primera infancia también recibieron capacitación en un simposio de 1 día sobre cómo usar y enseñar con cada una de estas herramientas (Chambers 2015).

Estas escuelas piloto también reciben apoyo técnico continuo y asistencia con la integración curricular como parte de este enfoque integral (IDA Singapur 2015).

El estudio de referencia (Sullivan & Bers, 2017) se centra en evaluar los resultados de aprendizaje y compromiso de una de las herramientas de Playmaker implementadas: el kit de robótica KIBO. KIBO es un kit de construcción de robótica diseñado específicamente para niños de 4 a 7 años de edad para aprender habilidades básicas de ingeniería y programación (Sullivan y Bers 2015). Las características del kit KIBO y cómo se utilizó se describen en detalle en la sección ”Métodos’ del estudio’. Además de evaluar los conceptos técnicos que los niños dominan con KIBO, este estudio también examina el potencial de la robótica KIBO para promover conductas personales y sociales positivas en niños pequeños. Finalmente, describe la experiencia desde la perspectiva de los docentes.

Referencias.-

Ausubel, D. P. (1963). The psychology of meaningful verbal learning; an introduction to school learning. New York: Grune & Stratton.

ANDERSON, J.A. (1993) Rules of the Mind (Hillsdale, NJ, Erlbaum).

Arraki, K., Blair, K., Bürgert, T., Greenling, J., Haebe, J., Lee, G., Peel, A., Szczepanski, V., Pontelli, E. and Hug, S. (2014, October). DISSECT: An experiment in infusing computational thinking in K-12 science curricula. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2014 IEEE (pp. 1-9). IEEE.

Baker, M., Hansen, T., Joiner, R., & Traum, D. (1999). The role of grounding in collaborative learning tasks. In P. Dillenbourg (Ed.), Collaborative Learning: Cognitive and Computational Approaches. (pp. 31-63; 223-225). Elsevier Science.http://www.uio.no/studier/emner/matnat/ifi/TOOL5100/v08/leseliste/F9/baker99role.pdf

Balanskat, A.  & Engelhardt , K. (October, 2014). Computing our future Computer programming and coding – Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe.  European Schoolnet (EUN Partnership AISBL) http://www.eun.org/c/document_library/get_file?uuid=521cb928-6ec4-4a86-b522-9d8fd5cf60ce&groupId=43887

Balanskat, A.  & Engelhardt , K. (October, 2015). Computing our future Computer programming and coding – Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe.  European Schoolnet (EUN Partnership AISBL)

Bargury, I. Z., Muller, O., Haberman, B., Zohar, D., Cohen, A., Levy, D., & Hotoveli, R. (2012, October). Implementing a new computer science curriculum for middle school in Israel. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2012 (pp. 1-6). IEEE. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/6462365/   y   https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Dalit_Levy/publication/261196400_Implementing_a_new_Computer_Science_Curriculum_for_middle_school_in_Israel/links/5605989108ae8e08c08c9079/Implementing-a-new-Computer-Science-Curriculum-for-middle-school-in-Israel.pdf en abierto.

Bawden, D. (2001). Information and digital literacies: a review of concepts. Journal of Documentation, 57(2), 218–259.

Bawden, D. (2008). Origins and concepts of digital literacy. Digital literacies: Concepts, policies and practices, 17-32. http://sites.google.com/site/colinlankshear/DigitalLiteracies.pdf#page=19

Bell, T., Alexander, J., Freeman, I., & Grimley, M. (2009). Computer science unplugged: School students doing real computing without computers. The New Zealand Journal of Applied Computing and Information Technology13(1), 20-29. http://www.computingunplugged.org/sites/default/files/papers/Unplugged-JACIT2009submit.pdf

Bell, T., Andreae, P., & Robins, A. (2014). A case study of the introduction of computer science in NZ schools. ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE)14(2), 10. https://ir.canterbury.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10092/10570/12652431_NZ-case-study-TOCE-v5.pdf?sequence=1  y  https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2602485

Bergin, J. (2008) Pedagogical Patterns Project [en línea]. Disponible en: http://www.pedagogicalpatterns.org/

Blikstein,  (2013). Seymour Papert’s Legacy: Thinking About Learning, and Learning About Thinking. https://tltl.stanford.edu/content/seymour-papert-s-legacy-thinking-about-learning-and-learning-about-thinking

Bono, E. D. (1968). New think: the use of lateral thinking in the generation of new ideas. Basic Books.

Bono, E. D. (1970). Lateral Thinking. A Textbook of Creativity. Londres: Ward Lock Educational.

Bono, E. DE (1986):El pensamiento lateral: manual de creatividad. Editorial Paidós.

Bloom, B.S. (1984). The 2 Sigma Problem: The Search for Methods of Group Instruction as ffective as One-to-One Tutoring, Educational Researcher, 13:6 (4-16). http://www.comp.dit.ie/dgordon/Courses/ILT/ILT0004/TheTwoSigmaProblem.pdf

Bocconi, S. et al (2016). Developing Computational Thinking in Compulsory Education. Implications for policy and practice.   http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/bitstream/JRC104188/jrc104188_computhinkreport.pdf

Burgett, T., Folk, R., Fulton, J., Peel, A., Pontelli, E. and Szczepanski, V. (2015, October). DISSECT: Analysis of pedagogical techniques to integrate computational thinking into K-12 curricula. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2015. 32614 2015. IEEE (pp. 1-9). IEEE.

Carvalho, T., Andrade, D., Silveira, J., Auler, V., Cavalheiro, S., Aguiar, M., Foss, L., Pernas, A. and Reiser, R., 2013, October. Discussing the challenges related to deployment of computational thinking in brazilian basic education. In Theoretical Computer Science (WEIT), 2013 2nd Workshop-School on (pp. 111-115). IEEE. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Marilton_Aguiar/publication/268240422_Discussing_the_Challenges_Related_to_Deployment_of_Computational_Thinking_in_Brazilian_Basic_Education/links/54abd8080cf2bce6aa1dbf62.pdf y http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/6778575/

Caspersen, M. E., & Nowack, P. (2013, January). Computational thinking and practice: A generic approach to computing in Danish high schools. In Proceedings of the Fifteenth Australasian Computing Education Conference-Volume 136 (pp. 137-143). Australian Computer Society, Inc. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2667214 y en abierto http://cs.au.dk/~mic/publications/conference/41–ace2013.pdf

Chambers, J. (2015). Inside Singapore’s plans for robots in pre-schools. GovInsider. Retrieved from: https://govinsider.asia/smart-gov/exclusive-singapore-puts-robots-in-pre-schools/

Chiprianov, V., & Gallon, L. (2016, July). Introducing Computational Thinking to K-5 in a French Context. In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (pp. 112-117). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2899439

Clark, D. (2014) Learning Styles & Preferences. http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/styles.html

Coffield, F., Moseley, D., Hall, E., Ecclestone, K. (2004). Learning Styles and Pedagogy in Post-16 Learning: A systematic and critical review. www.LSRC.ac.uk: Learning and Skills Research Centre. Retrieved from: http://www.lsda.org.uk/files/PDF/1543.pdf

Constantinidou, F., Baker, S. (2002). Stimulus modality and verbal learning performance in normal aging. Brain and Language, 82(3), 296-311.

Corballis, M. C. (2007). Pensamiento recursivo. Mente y cerebro, 27, 78-87. http://amscimag.sigmaxi.org/4Lane/ForeignPDF/2007-05CorballisSpanish.pdf

Corballis, M. C. (2014). The recursive mind: The origins of human language, thought, and civilization. Princeton University Press. http://press.princeton.edu/titles/9424.html

DeLano, D.E. y  Rising, L. (1997).  Introducing Technology into the Workplace. Proceedings  PLoP’97 Conference. Consultado en http://hillside.net/plop/plop97/Proceedings/delano.pdf

Dillenbourg, P. (1999). What do you mean by collaborative learning?.Collaborative-learning: Cognitive and Computational Approaches., 1-19. https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/file/index/docid/190240/filename/Dillenbourg-Pierre-1999.pdf

Dorn, R. I. (December, 2016) Computer Science K–12 Learning Standards Adoption Statement. http://www.k12.wa.us/ComputerScience/pubdocs/ComputerScienceStandards.pdf

Duncan, C., & Bell, T. (2015, November). A pilot computer science and programming course for primary school students. In Proceedings of the Workshop in Primary and Secondary Computing Education (pp. 39-48). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2818328

Eggleston, J. (1982). Sociología del currículum. Ed. Troquel. Buenos Aires.

Esteban, M. y Zapata, M. (2008, Enero). Estrategias de aprendizaje y eLearning. Un apunte para la fundamentación del diseño educativo en los entornos virtuales de aprendizaje. Consideraciones para la reflexión y el debate. Introducción al estudio de las estrategias y estilos de aprendizaje. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, número 19. Consultado (día/mes/año) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/19

Eshet, Y. (2002). Digital literacy: A new terminology framework and its application to the design of meaningful technology-based learning environments, In P. Barker and S. Rebelsky (Eds.), Proceedings of the World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecomunications, 493–498 Chesapeake VA: AACE, Retrieved November 30, 2007, from http://infosoc.haifa.ac.il/DigitalLiteracyEshet.doc

Eshet-Alkalai, Y. (2004), Digital literacy: a conceptual framework for survival skills in the digital era, Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 139(1), 93–106. Available at: http://www.openu.ac.il/Personal_sites/download/Digital-literacy2004-JEMH.pdf

Fitch, T., Hauser, M. & Chomsky, N.  2005.  The evolution of the language faculty:      Clarifications and implications.   Cognition. 97.179-210

Fricke, A. y Voelter, M. (2000). SEMINARS: A Pedagogical Pattern Language about teaching seminars, [en línea]. Proceding EuroPLoP 2000. Disponible en: http://www.voelter.de/publications/seminars.html [2008, 2 diciembre].

Gilster, P. (1997). Digital literacy. New York: Wiley.

Gordon, W. J. (1961). Synectics: The development of creative capacity.

Grover, S., Cooper, S., & Pea, R. (2014, June). Assessing computational learning in K-12. In Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Innovation & technology in computer science education (pp. 57-62). ACM. https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/41163349/Assessing_computational_learning_in_K-1220160114-23479-hj8516.pdf

Grover, S., Pea, R., & Cooper, S. (2016, February). Factors influencing computer science learning in middle school. In Proceedings of the 47th ACM technical symposium on computing science education (pp. 552-557). ACM.  http://life-slc.org/docs/LSLC_rp_A211_Grover-Pea-Cooper-SIGSCE2016.pdf

 

Grover, S., Pea, R., & Cooper, S. (2015). Designing for deeper learning in a blended computer science course for middle school students. Computer Science Education25(2), 199-237. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08993408.2015.1033142 y https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/4f37/83f96f0c4aa579d5eea160ff56c15f5e7c85.pdf

Hauser, M., Chomsky, N.,  & Fitch, T.  2002.  The faculty of language: what is it, who has it, and how did it evolve. Science 198. 1569-79

Hackenberg, A. J. (2007). Units coordination and the construction of improper fractions: A revision of the splitting hypothesis. Journal of Mathematical Behavior, 26(1), 27–47.

Hansen, T., Dirckinck-Holmfeld, L., Lewis, R., & Rugelj, J. (1999). Using telematics to support collaborative knowledge construction. Collaborative learning: Cognitive and computational approaches, 169-196.http://www.researchgate.net/publication/228559912_Using_telematics_to_support_collaborative_knowledge_construction/file/60b7d523962ffc2db3.pdf

Hayman-Abello SE, Warriner EM (2002). (2002). Child clinical/pediatric neuropsychology: some recent advances. Annual review of psychology,53(1), 309-339.

Himanen, P. (2002). La ética del hacker y el espíritu de la era de la información.http://eprints.rclis.org/12851/

IDA Singapore. (2015). IDA supports preschool centres with technology-enabled toys to build creativity and confidence in learning. Retrieved from: https://www.ida.gov.sg/About-Us/Newsroom/Media-Releases/ 2015/IDA-supports-preschool-centres-with-technology-enabled-toys-to-build-creativity-andconfidence-in-learning.

Jenkins, J.T., Jerkins, J.A. and Stenger, C.L. (2012), March. A plan for immediate immersion of computational thinking into the high school math classroom through a partnership with the alabama math, science, and technology initiative. In Proceedings of the 50th Annual Southeast Regional Conference (pp. 148-152). ACM.

Jonassen, D., Davidson, M., Collins, M., Campbell, J., & Haag, B. B. (1995). Constructivism and computer‐mediated communication in distance education.American journal of distance education9(2), 7-26. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08923649509526885

Jovanov, M., Stankov, E., Mihova, M., Ristov, S., & Gusev, M. (2016, April). Computing as a new compulsory subject in the Macedonian primary schools curriculum. In Global Engineering Education Conference (EDUCON), 2016 IEEE (pp. 680-685). IEEE. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/7474623/

Keefe, J.W. (1979) Learning style: An overview. NASSP’s Student learning styles: Diagnosing and proscribing programs (pp. 1-17). Reston, VA. National Association of Secondary School Principles..

Koch, T., & Denike, K. (2009). Crediting his critics’ concerns: Remaking John Snow’s map of Broad Street cholera, 1854. Social science & medicine69(8), 1246-1251.http://www.albany.edu/faculty/fboscoe/papers/koch2009.pdf

Lanham, R.A. (1995). Digital literacy, Scientifi c American, 273(3), 160–161.

Lankshear, C. and Knobel, M. (2006). Digital literacies: policy, pedagogy and research considerations for education. Digital Kompetanse: Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, 1(1), 12–24.

Leeder, D., Boyle, T., Morales, R., Wharrad, H., & Garrud, P. (2004). To boldly GLO-towards the next generation of Learning Objects. In World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (Vol. 2004, No. 1, pp. 28-33).

Liu, J., Hasson, E. P., Barnett, Z. D., & Zhang, P. (2011, October). A survey on computer science K-12 outreach: teacher training programs. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2011 (pp. T4F-1). IEEE. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/6143111/

Lockwood, J., & Mooney, A. (2017). Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it Fit? A systematic literary review. arXiv preprint arXiv:1703.07659.

 

Mack, N. K. (2001). Building on informal knowledge through instruction in a complex content domain: Partitioning, units, and understanding multiplication of fractions. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 32(3), 267–296.

Mandelbrot, B. (1982). The fractal geometry of nature. W. H. Freeman.

Mandelbrot, B. (1977). Fractals, form, chance and dimension. W. H. Freeman.

Marzano, R.J. (1998). A theory-based meta-analysis of research on instruction. Mid-continent Regional Educational Laboratory, Aurora, CO.

Merrill, D. (2000). Instructional Strategies and Learning Styles: Which takes Precedence? Trends and Issues in Instructional Technology, R. Reiser and J. Dempsey (Eds.). Prentice Hall.

Merrill, M. D. (2009). First principles of instruction. In C. M. Reigeluth & A. A. Carr-Chellman (Eds.), Instructional-design theories and models: Building a common knowledge base (Vol. III, pp. 41-56). New York: Routledge.

Mensing, K., Mak, J., Bird, M., & Billings, J. (2013, October). Computational, model thinking and computer coding for US Common Core Standards with 6 to 12 year old students. In Emerging eLearning Technologies and Applications (ICETA), 2013 IEEE 11th International Conference on (pp. 17-22). IEEE.

Miller, R. B., Kelly, G. N., & Kelly, J. T. (1988). Effects of Logo computer programming experience on problem solving and spatial relations ability. Contemporary Educational Psychology13(4), 348-357. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0361476X88900343

MONTESSORI, M. (1928). Antropología Pedagógica. Barcelona: Araluce

MONTESSORI, M. (1937). Método de la Pedagogía Científica. Barcelona: Araluce

MONTESSORI, M. (1935). Manual práctico del método. Barcelona: Araluce

Mooney, A., Duffin, J., Naughton, T., Monahan, R., Power, J. and Maguire, P. (2014). PACT: An initiative to introduce computational thinking to second-level education in Ireland.

Nesiba, N., Pontelli, E. and Staley, T., (2015, October). DISSECT: Exploring the relationship between computational thinking and English literature in K-12 curricula. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2015. 32614 2015. IEEE (pp. 1- 8). IEEE.

Olive, J., & Vomvoridi, E. (2006). Making sense of instruction on fractions when a student lacks necessary fractional schemes: The case of Tim. Journal of Mathematical Behavior 25(1), 18–45.

Reigeluth, C. M. (2012). Instructional theory and technology for the new paradigm of education. RED, Revista de Educación a distancia32, 1-18. http://www.um.es/ead/red/32/reigeluth.pdf.

Reigeluth, C. M., & Carr-Chellman, A. A. (2009a). Situational principles of instruction. In C. M. Reigeluth & A. A. Carr-Chellman (Eds.), Instructional-design theories and models: Building a common knowledge base (Vol. III, pp. 57-68). New York: Routledge.

Ribeiro, L., Nunes, D.J., Da Cruz, M.K. and Matos, E.D.S., 2013, October. Computational Thinking: Possibilities and Challenges. In Theoretical Computer Science (WEIT), 2013 2nd Workshop-School on (pp. 22-25). IEEE.  http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/6778560/ y http://www.computacional.com.br/arquivos/Gerais/RIBEIRO%20-%20Computational%20Thinking%20-%20Possibilities%20and%20Challenges.pdf

Rosas, M. J. M. (2012). Recensión de “The recursive mind. The origins of human language, thought, and civilization”, de Michael C. Corballis. Teorema: Revista internacional de filosofía, 31(1), 151-154. http://dialnet.unirioja.es/descarga/articulo/4349918.pdf

Salomon, G. (1993). Distributed cognitions. Psychological and educational considerations (pp. 111-138) Cambridge, USA: Cambridge University Press.

Sentance, S., Dorling, M., & McNicol, A. (2013, February). Computer science in secondary schools in the UK: Ways to empower teachers. In International Conference on Informatics in Schools: Situation, Evolution, and Perspectives (pp. 15-30). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/44b0/074bd6fc438a459638f029667ff1ff79d9dd.pdf en abierto y https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-36617-8_2

Silva, R. (2014). START CODING THIS YEAR IT’S EASIER THAN YOU THINK. http://yearofcode.org/

Steffe, L. P., & Olive, J. (2010). Children’s fractional knowledge. Springer: New York.

Steffe, L. P. (2004). On the construction of learning trajectories of children: The case of commensurate fractions. Mathematical Thinking and Learning, 6(2), 129–162

Steffen, J. H. (2008). Optimal boarding method for airline passengers. Journal of Air Transport Management14(3), 146-150. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969699708000239

Stewart, K.L., Felicetti, L.A. (1992). Learning styles of marketing majors. Educational Research Quarterly, 15(2), 15-23.

Sullivan, A., & Bers, M. U. (2015). Robotics in the early childhood classroom: Learning outcomes from an 8-week robotics curriculum in pre-kindergarten through second grade. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. doi:10.1007/s10798-015-9304-5.

Sullivan, A., & Bers, M. U. (2017). Dancing robots: integrating art, music, and robotics in Singapore’s early childhood centers. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 1-22.https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10798-017-9397-0

Sysło, M. M., & Kwiatkowska, A. B. (2015, September). Introducing a new computer science curriculum for all school levels in Poland. In International Conference on Informatics in Schools: Situation, Evolution, and Perspectives (pp. 141-154). Springer, Cham. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-25396-1_13

Thompson, D., & Bell, T. (2013, November). Adoption of new computer science high school standards by New Zealand teachers. In Proceedings of the 8th Workshop in Primary and Secondary Computing Education (pp. 87-90). ACM. https://itp.nz/files/wipsce-teachers-2013.pdf y https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2532759

Thompson-Schill, S., Kraemer, D., Rosenberg, L. (2009). Visual Learners Convert Words To Pictures In The Brain And Vice Versa, Says Psychology Study. University of Pennsylvania. News article retrieved from http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/news/visual-learners-convert-words-pictures-brain-and-vice-versa-says-penn-psychology-study

Valverde-Berrocoso, J., Fernández-Sánchez, M.R., Garrido-Arroyo, M.C. (2015). El pensamiento computacional y las nuevas ecologías del aprendizaje. RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia. Número 46. Número monográfico sobre «Pensamiento Computacional». Septiembre de 2015. Consultado el (dd/mm/aa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/46

Washington, US Congress of Technology Assessment, OTA CIT-235 (April 1984). Computerized Manufacturing Automation: Employment, Education and the Workplace, page 234. http://ota-cdn.fas.org/reports/8408.pdf

Werner, L., Denner, J., Campe, S., & Kawamoto, D. C. (2012, February). The fairy performance assessment: measuring computational thinking in middle school. In Proceedings of the 43rd ACM technical symposium on Computer Science Education(pp. 215-220). ACM. https://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/courses/compsci747s2c/lectures/wernerFairyComputationalThinkingAssessment.pdf   y   https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2157200

Wilkins, J. L. M., & Norton, A. (2011). The splitting loope. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 42(4), 386–416

Wilkins, J. L., Norton, A., & Boyce, S. J. (2013). Validating a Written Instrument for Assessing Students’ Fractions Schemes and Operations. Mathematics Educator, 22(2), 31-54.

Wing, J.M. (March 2006). Computational Thinking. It represents a universally applicable attitude and skill set everyone, not just computer scientists, would be eager to learn and use. COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM /Vol. 49, No. 3. https://www.cs.cmu.edu/~15110-s13/Wing06-ct.pdf

Wood, D., & Wood, H. (1996). Vygotsky, tutoring and learning. Oxford review of Education, 22(1), 5-16. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1050800

Wood, D., & Wood, H. (1996). Vygotsky, tutoring and learning. Oxford review of Education22(1), 5-16. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0305498960220101#.VI3EvyuG-_l

Zapata-Ros, M. (1996a). Integración de la GEOMETRÍA FRACTAL en las Matemáticas, y en la Informática, de Secundaria. http://platea.pntic.mec.es/~mzapata/tutor_ma/fractal/fracuned.htm# Pero… ¿qué son los fractales?

Zapata-Ros, M. et al (1996b). Integración de la GEOMETRÍA FRACTAL en las Matemáticas, y en la Informática, de Secundaria.  Materiales para la Enseñanza Secundaria: área de Matemáticas y área de Educación FísicaDocumentos CEP . Núm. 47. CEP Murcia II. http://hdl.handle.net/11162/645.

Zapata-Ros, M. (2009): Objetos de aprendizaje generativos, competencias individuales, agrupamientos de competencias y adaptatividad . RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, número monográfico X. Consultado (DD/MM/AA) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/M10. Pág. 5.

Zapata-Ros, M. (2012). La Sociedad Postindustrial del Conocimiento. Un enfoque multidisciplinar desde la perspectiva de los nuevos métodos para organizar el aprendizaje. Amazon. Consultado en http://www.amazon.es/Sociedad-Postindustrial-del-Conocimiento-multidisciplinar/dp/1492180580.

Zapata-Ros, M. (2013a).  ¿Por qué nos gustan las cosas hermosas? La belleza está escrita en lenguaje matemático mucho antes de que se descubra. Blog Redes Abiertas. http://redesabiertas.blogspot.com.es/2013/03/por-que-nos-gustan-las-cosas-hermosas.html

Zapata-Ros, M. (2013b). El “problema de 2 sigma” y el aprendizaje ayudado por la tecnología en la Educación Universitaria. http://red.hypotheses.org/287 Zapata-Ros, M. (2014). La fundamentación teórica y científica del conectivismo. RED-Hypotheses. http://red.hypotheses.org/688

Zapata-Ros, M. (2014a). Enseñanza Universitaria en línea: MOOC, aprendizaje divergente y creatividad (II).RED-Hypotheses. http://red.hypotheses.org/416

Zapata-Ros, M. (2014b). Enseñanza Universitaria en línea: MOOC, aprendizaje divergente y creatividad (II).RED-Hypotheses. http://red.hypotheses.org/427

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia. Número 46.  15 de Septiembre de 2015. Consultado el (dd/mm/aa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/46

Zur-Bargury, I. (2012, July). A new curriculum for junior-high in computer science. In Proceedings of the 17th ACM annual conference on Innovation and technology in computer science education (pp. 204-208). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2325347

Zur-Bargury, I., Pârv, B., & Lanzberg, D. (2013, July). A nationwide exam as a tool for improving a new curriculum. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM conference on Innovation and technology in computer science education (pp. 267-272). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2462479.

Pensamiento computacional. Una tercera competencia clave (VI): Discusión.

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Alcalá

Ésta es la sexta entrada de una serie que, en conjunto, constituirán un capítulo de un libro que será  publicado por la editorial de la Universidad Católica de Santa María de Arequipa (Perú) con el título “El pensamiento computacional: La nueva alfabetización de las culturas digitales”.

En las anteriores entradas se ha planteado que el pensamiento computacional  debe constituir una tercera competencia clave dentro del curriculum escolar, qué son las alfabetizaciones y las culturas digitales , una definición de Pensamiento Computacional, cuáles son las habilidades y procedimientos que lo constituyen y en qué fases de la elaboración de un código intervienen.

 

Discusión.-

Por último hará falta dilucidar cuales son los caminos abiertos y cuales los problemas que podemos encontrarnos en la consideración del Pensamiento Computacional como una competencia clave, en el diseño de un currículo formal y en el diseño de competencias docentes vinculadas a él. En otro punto de este libro abordamos la creación de un lenguaje de patrones.

Falta pues por determinar con evidencias empíricas si, como parece, la codificación es una competencia compleja o un conjunto de competencias, así como establecer en términos diferenciados cuáles son esas competencias y determinar el diseño y los términos de las investigaciones que diesen lugar a estas delimitaciones.

Faltaría pues definir qué es codificación en un sentido pluridisciplinar que implique a profesionales de la psicología del Aprendizaje y del Desarrollo, los especialistas en Educación (Pedagogía del pensamiento computacional, curriculum, etc)

Code, o codificación como lo hemos traducido, o programming code (programación de códigos) consiste en elaborar códigos fuente de programas de ordenador que puedan ser interpretados y/o compilados por un interface para decirle a  un sistema informático cómo se resuelve un problema o cómo se realiza un procedimiento de forma eficaz.

En los documentos utilizados para elaborar este trabajo se ha definido (Balanskat y Engelhardt, October 2014 p. 5) como

una competencia clave que tendrá que ser adquirida por todos los jóvenes estudiantes y cada vez más por los trabajadores en una amplia gama de actividades industriales y profesiones. La codificación es parte del razonamiento lógico y representa una de las habilidades clave que forma parte de lo que ahora se llaman “habilidades del siglo 21″.

No obstante en el informe citado, donde se ponen énfasis en esta necesidad (de hecho es el documento base para la integración de las enseñanzas para la adquisición de las competencias para la codificación) como prioridad de la UE:

  1. No se plantea como una idea de un curriculum integral y sistémico que abarque desde las etapas preescolares hasta la educación universitaria.
  2. Se dedica a describir las experiencias y el estado de la cuestión en los países europeos, donde solo se constatan situaciones de inclusión en otras materias o de materias específicas de programación del tipo que hemos señalado.

Sin embargo en este trabajo hemos puesto de relieve que la codificación es una competencia compleja o más bien un complejo de habilidades de las que participan posiblemente, entre otras, las 14 que hemos glosado, y al que en conjunto es lo que llamamos pensamiento computacional, de manera que su adquisición quedaría incompleta si faltase alguno de estos elementos.

Por último quedaría analizar además cuales serían los pasos siguientes `para determinar el curriculum y las características de la formación de los profesores y maestros.

 

Referencias.-

Balanskat, A.  & Engelhardt , K. (October, 2014). Computing our future Computer programming and coding – Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe.  European Schoolnet (EUN Partnership AISBL) http://www.eun.org/c/document_library/get_file?uuid=521cb928-6ec4-4a86-b522-9d8fd5cf60ce&groupId=43887

 

 

Pensamiento computacional. Una tercera competencia clave (V): Fases de creación de un código y componentes de pensamiento computacional.

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Alcalá

Ésta es la quinta entrada de una serie que, en conjunto, constituirán un capítulo de un libro que será  publicado por la editorial de la Universidad Católica de Santa María de Arequipa (Perú) con el título “El pensamiento computacional: La nueva alfabetización de las culturas digitales”.

En las anteriores entradas se ha planteado que el pensamiento computacional  debe constituir una tercera competencia clave dentro del curriculum escolar, qué son las alfabetizaciones y las culturas digitales , una definición de Pensamiento Computacional y cuáles son las habilidades y procedimientos que lo constituyen.

Fases de creación de un código y componentes de pensamiento computacional

¿Cómo intervienen o cómo se integran estas componentes en las distintas fases de que consta un proceso de creación de un código? En lo que sigue haremos un abordamiento de ese problema.

Las fases del proceso de creación de un código están muy estudiadas desde el punto de vista de la informática. Ahora queremos estudiarlo desde el punto de vista del pensamiento computacional: qué elementos de este pensamiento, de los que hemos visto en las entradas anteriores, están presentes en cada una de estas fases.

La propuesta cuales son las fases diferenciadas en el proceso de creación de un código es

  • Detección y delimitación del problema y de su naturaleza
  • Delimitación de métodos y disciplinas en la resolución del problema
  • Organización de la resolución,feed back e investigación formativa
  • Diseño de la resolución
  • Algoritmia/ diagrama de flujo.- Incluye la discusión
  • Elaboración del código (programa).- Incluye codificación, ejecuciones e implementación, documentación, etiquetas, modularización
  • Prueba/ Validación .- Incluye implementación y depuraciones de errores,

 

Considerando además que hay elementos que se repiten o que se pueden considerar que están presentes en todas las fases, sin que tengan que ver directamente  y de forma exclusiva con algunas de ellas. Un ejemplo de este tipo de competencias es la metacognición.

La segunda cuestión es qué componentes están presentes en las distintas fases o en todas.

La propuesta que se presenta es (tabla 1):

Competencias  necesarias en todas las fases , sin que tengan que ver directamente  y de forma exclusiva con algunas de ellas Detección y delimitación del problema y de su naturaleza Delimitación de métodos y disciplinas en la resolución del problema Organización de la resolución, feed back e investigación formativa Diseño de la resolución Algoritmia/ diagrama de flujo Elaboración del código (programa) Validación
Metacognición X
Sinéctica X X X X X
Análisis descendente     X   X X
Análisis ascendente         X X
Recursividad     X   X X
Método por aprox.  sucesiv. Ensayo – error         X X X
Heurística       X X X
Iteración         X X
Pensamiento divergente       X    
Creatividad X X X X    
Resolución de problemas X X X X X X X
Pensamiento abstracto X            
Métodos colaborativos X X X X      
Patrones X            

Tabla 1

Pensamiento computacional. Una tercera competencia clave (IV): Un dominio teórico específico en las teorías del aprendizaje y un currículum.

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Alcalá

Ésta es la cuarta entrada de una serie que, en conjunto, constituirán un capítulo de un libro que será  publicado por la editorial de la Universidad Católica de Santa María de Arequipa (Perú) con el título “El pensamiento computacional: La nueva alfabetización de las culturas digitales”.

En las anteriores entradas se ha planteado que el pensamiento computacional  debe constituir una tercera competencia clave dentro del curriculum escolar, qué son las alfabetizaciones y las culturas digitales y una definición de Pensamiento Computacional.

Un dominio teórico específico del pensamiento computacional en las teorías del aprendizaje y un currículum.

El post anterior lo concluíamos con la elaboración de una definición de Pensamiento computacional que contenía una serie de elementos: habilidades específicas y de técnicas necesarias . Decíamos:

Siguiendo los trabajos de Eggleston (1980), en el artículo publicado en el número monográfico de RED sobre Pensamiento Computacional (Zapata-Ros, 2015), basado en la necesidad de contar con un corpus curricular, y que ahora resumimos, establecimos una relación de habilidades y de elementos más o menos complejos de desarrollo cognitivos asociados al Pensamiento Computacional y que en conjunto lo definen

Así lo planteamos, en el contexto de un análisis y de una elaboración interdisciplinar, viendo las implicaciones que tienen estas ideas para una redefinición de un dominio teórico específico dentro de las teorías del aprendizaje. Y desde luego con la intención de definir descriptivamente, en un primer acercamiento, un currículum adecuado a esos dominios conceptuales para las distintas etapas educativas y para la capacitación de maestros y profesores.

Esto es lo que en una primera aproximación hicimos con las limitaciones de un tratamiento general, pero que ahora estamos tratando de ampliar y de documentar, así como recoger las aportaciones que en los desarrollos prácticos e institucionales se están produciendo. Este es el sentido pues que tiene este trabajo.

En primer lugar resumimos las siguientes componentes del pensamiento computacional, tal como las definimos en el primer trabajo:

Con lo cual abordábamos el problema de la definición del Pensamiento Computacional con la siguiente propuesta, uniendo y completando las ideas de David Bawden (2008, Capítulo 1) con la definición de  Jeannette Wing (Wing, March 2006) y lo analizado el trabajo que precede al presente (Zapata-Ros, 2015):

El pensamiento computacional consiste en la resolución de problemas, el diseño de los sistemas, y la comprensión de la conducta y de las actividades humanas haciendo uso de conceptos y procedimientos básicos para el trabajo y la elaboración de programas y algoritmos en la informática, valiéndose para ello de habilidades específicas y de técnicas necesarias para estos objetivos, que en conjunto constituyen  la base de la cultura digital. Entre estas habilidades y técnicas se identifican las quince siguientes: Análisis ascendente, análisis descendente, heurística, pensamiento divergente, creatividad, resolución de problemas, pensamiento abstracto, recursividad, iteración, métodos por aproximaciones sucesivas (Ensayo – error), métodos colaborativos, patrones, sinéctica, metacognición y cinestesia

En este post vamos a realizar una descripción sucinta de cada uno de estos elementos.

Análisis descendente.-

Frecuentemente la aplicación de un método de resolución de un problema, o el abordamiento de una tarea compleja, es inaplicable tal como se nos presenta. Es entonces cuando la aplicación de un método general de resolución, o de un  algoritmo, implica un proceso detallado de análisis descendente que puede llevar  al diseño de submétodos de resolución, o bien de módulos de resolución de problemas distintos y auxiliares, o bien a definir acciones concretas,  modelos o funciones matemáticas auxiliares, etc.

Análisis ascendente.-

A la hora de plantear un problema complejo una de las formas de abordarlo es resolver primero los problemas más concretos, para pasar después a resolver los más abstractos. Es decir, vamos de lo más concreto a lo más abstracto. Esta forma de plantearlo recibe el nombre de análisis ascendente.

Hay que ser muy cuidadoso a la hora de elegir este método, está repleto de dificultades, la mayor parte de las cuales consisten en el tiempo que lleva y en que necesita de otro tipo de pensamientos, por ejemplo el pensamiento divergente para orientarse en el camino para llegar al resultado general, abstracto que se desea. Muchas veces hay que situarse primero en un nivel abstracto y de allí seleccionar los problemas concretos que nos ilustran para la resolución del problema general.

Heurística[1].-

Habitualmente se define  Heurística como un saber no científico, pero que se aplica en entornos científicos y que se refiere técnicas basadas en la experiencia para la resolución de problemas, al aprendizaje y al descubrimiento de propiedades o de reglas. Los métodos heurísticos no tienen el valor de la prueba sobre los resultados obtenidos con ellos, tienen más bien el valor de la conjetura o de la “regla de oro”,  ni tienen tampoco la garantía de que la solución que se obtiene es  única ni es la óptima. Este saber se obtiene  frecuentemente mediante la observación, el análisis y el registro, como un conocimiento derivado del estudio de los hábitos de trabajo de los científicos (en ese sentido es un arte, una técnica o un conjunto de procedimientos prácticos o informales) para resolver problemas. Cada uno de los procedimientos que constituyen ese saber es un heurístico.  Así podemos decir que un heurístico es cada una de las reglas metodológicas, no necesariamente formuladas como enunciados formales, en las que se  propone cómo proceder y cómo evitar dificultades para resolver problemas y conjeturar hipótesis.

También se considera de forma consensuada  que la heurística es un rasgo propio de los humanos. No es un producto original sino derivado otros procesos como son la creatividad y de lo que se conoce  como pensamiento lateral o pensamiento divergente.

 

Pensamiento lateral  y pensamiento divergente.-

El pensamiento lateral (lateral tinquen) es, en expresión introducida por Edward de Bono (1968, 1970 y 1986):

El pensamiento lógico, selectivo por naturaleza, ha de complementarse con las cualidades creativas del pensamiento lateral. Esta evolución se aprecia ya en el seno de algunas escuelas, aunque la actitud general hacia la creatividad es que constituye algo bueno en sí pero que no puede cultivarse de manera sistemática y que no existen procedimientos específicos prácticos a ese fin. Para salvar este lapso en la enseñanza se ha compuesto este libro, que tiene como tema el pensamiento lateral, o conjunto de procesos destinados al uso dé información de modo que genere ideas creativas mediante una reestructuración perspicaz de los conceptos ya existentes en la mente. El pensamiento lateral puede cultivarse con el estudio y desarrollarse mediante ejercicios prácticos de manera que pueda aplicarse de forma sistemática a la solución de problemas de la vida diaria y profesional. Es posible adquirir habilidad en su uso al igual que se adquiere habilidad en la matemática y en otros campos del saber.

En cualquier caso, el “pensamiento lateral” se ha difundido como paradigma dentro del área de la psicología individual y de la psicología social. Es la forma de pensamiento que está en la génesis de  las ideas que no concuerdan con el patrón de pensamiento habitual. La ventaja de este tipo de pensamiento con respecto a cualquier otro radica en evitar, al evaluar un problema, la inercia que se produce en esos casos producida por ideas comunes o comúnmente aceptadas, que limita las soluciones al problema. El pensamiento lateral ayuda pues a romper con ese esquema rígido de pensar y de formularse las ideas en el aprendizaje, y por consecuencia posibilita obtener ideas creativas e innovadoras. El principio contrario es igualmente cierto, estar en un contexto de ignorancia y de prejuicios o de mediocridad inhibe el pensamiento lateral, divergente, y la creatividad.

Polya y Bono estudian los recursos del pensamiento divergente. Estos recursos empleados en educación, insertos en estrategias y métodos educativos, producen unos aprendizajes distintos, constituyen el aprendizaje divergente. Es un aprendizaje que está en el origen y en la práctica de los estudios de las artes y de los oficios, es común en los talleres de los artistas, de los artesanos y de los científicos e investigadores. En general allí donde se produce creación. De esta forma se puede considerar  aprendizaje divergente como aquel que utiliza los recursos del pensamiento divergente.

 

Creatividad[2].-

El pensamiento divergente y el pensamiento convergente son tratados en relación con la creatividad por Mihály Csíkszentmihályi (1998) en su libro Creativity: Flow and the psychology of discovery and invention, traducido y publicado por Paidós como Creatividad: el fluir y la psicología del descubrimiento y la invención (págs. 83 y 84). El libro no es solo un estudio sobre una amplia variedad de comportamientos, hábitos, e ideas de individuos que han realizado aportaciones sustanciales sobre las cuales hay consenso de su carácter creativo, sino que establece un marco epistemológico y teórico de lo que es la creatividad como facultad humana y como fenómeno (un requisito de la creatividad es su validación social).

Csikszentmihalyi, como hemos visto que lo hace Pólya, coincide en que la creatividad no es consecuencia exclusivamente del pensamiento divergente sino de una combinación de ambos pensamientos, el convergente y el divergente, y desde luego sin el primero no podría producirse aunque el insight lo produzca el segundo. Señala que los creativos, “quienes producen una novedad aceptable en un campo, parecen capaces de usar bien dos formas opuestas de pensamiento: el convergente y el divergente.” Éste sería uno de los principales rasgos de la creatividad. EI pensamiento convergente es el pensamiento que sirve para estructurar los conocimientos de una forma lógica y para aplicar sus leyes. Por decirlo de forma simplificada es el  que se mide por los test de CI, y es condición indispensable para establecer modelos donde se resuelven los problemas bien definidos, que tienen soluciones validables, mediante un procedimiento sin ambigüedades. Pero hay otro pensamiento, es el que guía la acción investigadora hacia las soluciones, y sobre todo el que conduce a unas soluciones no convencionales, e implica fluidez y capacidad para generar una gran cantidad de visiones e ideas sobre el problema que se trabaja, para cambiar de unas a otras, y para establecer asociaciones inusuales. Es el pensamiento divergente, como hemos visto. Estas variables —capacidad de orientar la indagación, fluidez, facilidad para generar ideas, para cambiar de marco y para establecer asociaciones inusuales—  son las que se tienen en cuenta y se miden en los test de creatividad, y las habilidades que se trabajan en la mayoría de los talleres de  creatividad.

 

Resolución de problemas.-

En realidad el pensamiento computacional es una variante del dominio metodológico que se conoce como “resolución de problemas”. Es una restricción de la resolución de problemas a aquellos problemas cuya resolución se puede implementar con ordenadores. En este caso es muy importante distinguir que los aprendices no son sólo los usuarios de la herramienta, sino que sobre todo se convierten en los constructores y en los autores de las herramientas.

Para eso los alumnos utilizan procedimientos, conjuntos de objetos de conocimiento y conceptos que constituyen dominios que tratamos de forma separada en este escrito. Como son la abstracción, la recursividad y la iteración- Los utilizan para procesar y analizar los datos de cara a crear métodos de resolución de problemas, y crear artefactos reales y virtuales para resolverlos. El pensamiento computacional de esta forma se puede considerar también como una metodología de resolución de problemas que se puede automatizar.

La otra vinculación del pensamiento computacional con la resolución de problemas lo constituye la visión que se puede desarrollar en los alumnos y que se manifiesta en el aula para encontrar soluciones a problemas a través del ordenador. Para esta visión también son importantes elementos de pensamiento que veremos con entidad propia como son el desarrollo de herramientas para resolver problemas por métodos de ensayos progresivos y error y por las posibilidades que tienen los ordenadores para trabajar en “una atmósfera de entender las cosas juntos”.

 

Pensamiento abstracto.-

Es la capacidad para operar con modelos ideales abstractos de la realidad, abstrayendo las propiedades de los objetos que son relevantes para un estudio. Una vez obtenido el modelo abstracto de la realidad se estudian sus propiedades, se extraen conclusiones o reglas que permiten predecir los comportamientos de los objetos. El pensamiento abstracto por excelencia es el pensamiento matemático, la geometría, etc.

El pensamiento abstracto tiene mucho que ver con la edad del niño, no solo porque según las teorías de Piaget y las de la Psicología Genética, consideran que la abstracción es producto del desarrollo, de la maduración cognitiva del niño, sino porque los mecanismos de abstracción son muy distintos según la edad la edad del niño, existiendo desde las primeras etapas. Para un niño de dos años, “el día después del día de mañana” es un concepto muy abstracto. Para un estudiante de la universidad, el día después de mañana es un concepto relativamente concreto, sobre todo si la comparamos con las ideas realmente abstractas o  muy abstractas como son el Teorema de Bayes o el principio de indeterminación de Heisenberg.

Por supuesto, hay muchos niveles de abstracción entre estos dos extremos. Una componente importantísima en el diseño curricular es tener en cuenta el proceso de desarrollo intelectual que supone este proceso: Transitar gradualmente de pensamiento muy concreto al pensamiento abstracto, en función del desarrollo individual y esto tenerlo en cuenta en la presentación de los contenidos y destrezas a desarrollar. Esta cautela tiene que ver mucho con otra cuestión muy frecuente: Considerar lo abstracto como difícil y lo concreto como lo fácil, cuando muchas veces lo que sucede es que se presenta una habilidad o un concepto para ser aprendido en un momento poco adecuado, no por la edad exclusivamente sino sobre todo por las condiciones en que se produce el aprendizaje.

 

Recursividad

A veces un problema por su tamaño, o porque depende de un número natural (o de un cardinal) no puede ser resuelto por sí mismo pero puede ser remitido a otro problema de las mismas características o naturaleza pero más pequeño o dependiendo de un cardinal menor, que sí puede ser resuelto, o nos puede dar la pista de una regla de remitir problemas a problemas menores (regla de recurrencia). Y en ambos casos nos permite resolver el problema. A estos métodos, que son así considerados unos métodos de resolución de problemas, se les llama recursividad o recurrencia.

Con el término recursividad también se quiere en otras ocasiones abordar una forma de conceptualizar, de definir, objetos de conocimiento o ideas: De esta forma se dice que están definidos por recurrencia.

En esta forma de abordar el conocimiento se ha visto por un lado una forma más útil, o más económica cognitivamente, de abordar la resolución mediante procesos automatizados, o una forma más eficaz y elegante de abordar conceptos y definiciones que permiten integrarlas más eficientemente desde el punto de la lógica en un sistema teórico.

 

Iteración.-

La iteración consiste en la descomposición de un problema complejo en problemas sencillos, elementales, todos iguales y que se repiten hasta conseguir el objetivo deseado, Construir o diseñar una escalera es un ejemplo de iteración.

Escalera de Bramante (scala del bramante). Escalera de doble hélice iterativa. Museos Vaticanos, Estado de la Ciudad del Vaticano. Wikipedia CC BY-SA 4.0

De esta forma Iteración significa repetir un proceso con la intención de alcanzar una meta, un objetivo o un resultado deseados. Cada elemento que se repite en el proceso también se llama una “iteración”. Otras características lo son: la transferencia de resultados  entre iteraciones: los resultados de una se utilizan como punto de partida para la siguiente iteración; y la cláusula de parada: Qué condición ha de cumplirse para que se detenga el proceso, bien por alcanzar el objetivo, bien por cualquier otra razón

Siempre que hablamos de iteración pensamos en procedimientos repetitivos como los que utilizamos cuando aprendimos o cuando enseñábamos BASIC, Pascal, LOGO, o C++, y más recientemente Java o Phyton. Lo asociamos a bucles, a instrucciones FOR TO, while, do-while, repeat,… y a diagramas de flujo. En definitiva, era difícil hablar de iteración sin pensar en la construcción de algoritmos repetitivos. Sin embargo pocas veces pensamos que hay aprendizajes básicos, en las primeras etapas de desarrollo, donde se pone en marcha un sistema de pensamiento de este tipo. Pensemos por ejemplo en la adquisición que hacen los niños de las ideas sobre fracciones, números racionales, o incluso en los números reales, en la representación decimal, en la notación decimal de números reales, y en su representación ¿qué son sino más que procedimientos iterativos? También podríamos pensar en sistemas de medición, de magnitudes de peso, masa, volumen, superficie,… ¿qué son estos procesos sino sistemas de representación conceptual iterativas?

La iteración es una componente pues importante del pensamiento computacional, con una extensa proyección en otras representaciones cognitivas y en procedimientos que son la base de importantes actividades y tareas, como por ejemplo lo que hemos mencionado en relación con la medida y la representación de magnitudes y valores.

Pero no sólo es relevante a ese nivel, la iteración es la base de procedimientos complejos y está en la resolución de problemas con más alcance o más impacto que lo que supone su definición en una primera aproximación.

 

Métodos por aproximaciones sucesivas. Ensayo – error.

El método de resolución de problemas  por aproximaciones sucesivas, o por ensayo-error, constituye un procedimiento que utilizamos, confrontando  las ideas que nos formamos con la realidad tal como la percibimos, en acciones percepciones y en la formación de modelos cognitivos, de ideas. Sucede así en el ser humano a lo largo de toda la vida, desde las primeras etapas de desarrollo, en la que los niños comienzan a conocer la realidad, el mundo que les rodea. Utilizan los sentidos, la experimentación y la representación de las ideas obtenidas de las experiencias, para aceptar o rechazar el conocimiento que la realidad les ofrece y para inducirlo. Ese mecanismo forma parte del desarrollo humano, pero también lo encontramos en los fundamentos de la ciencia. Así lo encontramos en multitud de ámbitos y dominios del saber y de la técnica. Constituye la base de las ideas de Popper (1934) que fundamentan el método científico. Lo encontramos igualmente como uno de los procedimientos que más frecuente utilizan los programadores, de forma espontánea y subyacente, en casi todas las fases de su trabajo. También constituye la esencia de la ayuda pedagógica que los maestros y tutores hacen a sus alumnos para guiarles en estos procesos de ensayo error y que no se pierdan o se distraigan por caminos inapropiados.

A Karl R. Popper se le considera el padre del método científico tal como se conoce en la actualidad, pero sobre todo es uno de los pensadores  contemporáneos más influyentes, cuyas teorías epistemológicas y sociopolíticas han ido más allá del estricto ámbito del método científico. Hasta él el método que utilizaba la ciencia era eminentemente deductivo. A partir de él todo cambia: La ciencia sigue siendo inductiva, pero su gran aportación ha sido que esta inducción ha avanzado a través del método hipotético-deductivo.

Así según Popper (1934), el método científico no usa un razonamiento inductivo, sino un razonamiento hipotético-deductivo (que simplificadamente se conoce como método de ensayo error o por aproximaciones sucesivas). Como en el caso del razonamiento inductivo, se pasa desde los datos que contrastan una hipótesis a una conclusión sobre ésta, es decir va de lo particular a lo general, en dirección inductiva. Sin embargo el método no es el de la inducción como razonamiento o inferencia. Sostiene que materialmente no es posible inducir o verificar todas las hipótesis o teorías (no es posible explorar todas las situaciones posibles para ver si la teoría se mantiene), ni siquiera hacerlo con las más probables. Además, los científicos en general buscan teorías altamente informativas.

La cuestión clave en la ciencia es qué criterio guía la búsqueda o el avance a través de las hipótesis que se eligen sucesivamente. En esta cuestión tiene bastante que decir  la creatividad y el pensamiento divergente, según vimos en otra ocasión.

En el aprendizaje, el mecanismo en esencia es el mismo. Pero en este caso es el papel que juega el tutor lo esencial, como veremos, sin despreciar los elementos naturales de motivación que el método que utilicemos en cada caso posee para el alumno. De esta forma el tutor ha de guiar de forma adecuada y sin ser invasivo el procedimiento para que el alumno tampoco desista, y este proceder es distinto en cada caso.

Pero volviendo a Popper y al método hipotético deductivo. Lo que se hace realmente en el proceso, en cada paso, es proponer una hipótesis como solución tentativa del problema particular, confrontar la predicción deducida, mediante la hipótesis, con la experiencia, y evaluar si la hipótesis se rechaza o no por los hechos (contraste de hipótesis). La cuestión es que con este método no verificamos las teorías, sólo las aceptamos cuando resisten el intento de rechazarlas. Por tanto, el  contraste radica en la crítica o, si estamos en ciencias sociales, en el intento serio de falsación, es decir, la eliminación de la parte del error dentro de una teoría, para rechazarla, si es falsa, y sustituirla por otra. Como hemos dicho el objetivo del método es la búsqueda de teorías verdaderas.

Este método (Popper, 1934), el actualmente aceptado como  método científico, utiliza sólo y de forma sistemática reglas metodológicas (no lógicas), para tomar decisiones. Reglas o principios metodológicos que tiene como base casi exclusivamente dos principios: La creatividad y la crítica. Hay que ser creativo y crítico. Hay que proponer hipótesis audaces y someterlas a tests experimentales  rigurosos. La lógica juega un papel fundamental como elemento que rige las decisiones y la elaboración de hipótesis que, mediante su contraste, confrontarán los hechos con las teorías convirtiéndolas en evidencias.

Una derivación de este método es el la acción educativa, particularmente en la tutoría. Y en él las ideas de contingencia e inmediatez. En este planteamiento juegan un papel clave las aproximaciones sucesivas a los objetivos educativos, es decir la acción tutorial.

Es importante la idea de contingencia: la sensación de que el problema puede ser resuelto o no en función del camino elegido.

De esta forma, en la tutoría, el cuándo y el dónde la ayuda pueden ser ofrecidas por el tutor es la clave. Ha de hacerse en los momentos pertinentes, es decir, de manera contingente. El tutor debe detectar, en el lugar y en el momento que se produzca, la dificultad de aquel aprendiz que comprenda insuficientemente el tema que es objeto de aprendizaje. De esta forma el tutor puede tener que intervenir con frecuencia para reparar el error y mostrar al alumno qué hacer.

 

Métodos colaborativos.- ¿Hacer cosas juntos o entender cosas juntos?

Expresiones como trabajo colaborativo o aprendizaje colaborativo son lugares comunes en la práctica de la enseñanza y en las teorías del aprendizaje. Tienen su origen remoto en los métodos socráticos, en el aprendizaje vicario y más recientemente en las teorías de Vygostky, en las del aprendizaje situado de Merrill y en el socioconstructivismo. Y han adquirido plena vigencia en los entornos conectados de aprendizaje. Si bien las aportaciones más fecundas en el mundo del aprendizaje con la ayuda de la tecnología se deben a David Jonassen, Mark Davidson, Mauri Collins, John Campbell, y  Brenda Bannan Haag (1995).

En el mundo computacional: La complejidad de desarrollos y arquitecturas hace inconcebible el trabajo aislado. Tienen que producirse fuertes flujos de trabajo y de comunicación que hagan posibles proyectos comunes en equipos amplios. De hecho se ha desarrollado una ética, casi una mística, conocida y popularizada por Pekka Himanen (2002) como la ética del hacker, basada en la emoción por compartir más que en el valor económico del trabajo propio de la ética de Weber, la ética protestante del trabajo.

En una buena parte esta disposición a compartir y al trabajo colaborativo constituye un elemento para la formación en valores del pensamiento computacional. Pero también implica un desafío, no todo el mundo de forma inicial acepta compartir, implica un compromiso e implica una técnica.

La definición más amplia pero igualmente imprecisa e insatisfactori, de “trabajo colaborativo” es la que da Dillenbourg (1999): Trabajo colaborativo es el que se produce en una situación en la que dos o más personas aprenden o intentan aprender algo juntos.

Es obvio que al menos hay tres imprecisiones en los elementos de esta definición, que se pueden interpretar de diferentes maneras:

“Dos o más” es ¿un par?, ¿un pequeño grupo (3-5 individuos)?, ¿una clase (20-30 sujetos)?, una comunidad (unos pocos cientos o miles de personas), ¿un MOOC?, ¿una sociedad (varios miles o millones de personas) … ¿cualquier nivel intermedio?. Esto da lugar a situaciones de aprendizaje completamente distintas, cada una de las cuales lleva aparejado un análisis que de forma no simple es muy diverso. Los entornos de los que estamos hablando y que permiten un trabajo fecundo son aquellos que permitan de forma eficiente a cada individuo procesar la información que genera el resto.

“Aprender algo” puede ser interpretado como “seguir un curso con provecho”, es decir cumpliendo los objetivos de aprendizaje previstos, o también se puede referir de forma laxa a aprender (en el sentido de comprender solo y memorizar de forma comprensiva) el “material del curso de estudio”, o bien “realizar actividades de aprendizaje tales como la resolución de problemas”, y en su caso óptimo que de ellas se desprenda conocimiento o elaboración, igualmente puede ser “aprender de la práctica del trabajo” que se realiza entre varios y en el que interviene la interacción.

Y en esto último es cuando interviene el último elemento de la definición: “juntos”. Que en cualquier caso implica y se debe interpretar como como una referencia a diferentes formas de interacción que, por la forma física de realizarse, origina distintos entornos y proceso cognitivos: Cara a cara, grupo o videogrupo (hangout), mediada por entornos de red, sociales (web social), sincrónicas o no, frecuentes en el tiempo o no, si se trata de un esfuerzo verdaderamente conjuntado y coordinado, si el trabajo se divide de una manera sistemática en un entorno colaborativo, híbrido y organizado con affordances a ese fin.

En resumen la cuestión no es tanto aprender técnicas para trabajar juntos como encontrar una cultura común, unas referencias y  unas experiencias que hagan que esa forma de trabajar fluya.

 

Patrones.-

Los patrones constituyen una herramienta para el análisis de la programación en dos aspectos: Evitan el trabajo tedioso que supone repetir partes de código o de diagramas de flujo o de procedimientos que en esencia se repiten pero aplicados a contextos y situaciones distintas, y por otro lado exige la capacidad de distinguir lo que tienen de común situaciones distintas. Esta facultad es útil en la programación pero igualmente en multitud de situaciones de la vida o de las actividades científica y profesionales, de hecho nacieron como tales en la arquitectura.

El concepto de patrón y su práctica se aplica, en la computación y en otros dominios, a estructuras de información que permiten resumir y comunicar la experiencia acumulada y la resolución de problemas, tanto en la práctica como en el diseño.

Así un patrón puede entenderse como una plantilla, una guía, un conjunto de directrices o de normas de diseño. Los patrones pueden entenderse desde dos perspectivas: La propia del dominio en el que estamos trabajando (la arquitectura, el diseño industrial, el diseño instruccional, etc.), o bien desde la perspectiva de los lenguajes y las técnicas computacionales que permiten el desarrollo de patrones.

 

Un patrón pues permite la adquisición de “buenas prácticas” y sirve como referencia para nuevas aplicaciones y casos. El almacenamiento y proceso sistemático de estos patrones permite construir corpus de información o bases de datos de referencias documentadas a las que los distintos profesionales o investigadores pueden dirigirse para sus trabajos específicos.

 

Los patrones tienen su origen en los patrones de diseño, o en lo patrones genéricos, y sirven  para aplicar en un campo cualquiera de la actividad de creación y de desarrollo, donde se quiere optimizar el trabajo intelectual haciendo más eficaz el trabajo empleado, o bien donde se quiere comunicar una parte operativa del diseño independientemente del dominio técnico del que se trate. Originalmente los patrones de diseño se deben al arquitecto Christopher Alexander (Alexander et al., 1977). Posteriormente estas técnicas se han adoptado en el campo de la ingeniería de software, y de allí se han incorporado al diseño instruccional tecnológico.

 

Un patrón (Alexander et al., 1977) “describe un problema que ocurre una y otra vez en nuestro entorno y, a continuación, describe el núcleo de la solución de ese problema, de tal manera que el usuario puede utilizar esta solución un millón de veces más, sin tener que hacerlo de la misma manera dos veces “.

Especial importancia merecen los los patrones instruccionales, aunque el término igualmente acuñado puede ser el de patrones pedagógicos (Pedagogical Patterns Project, 2008), porque sirven de comunicación en equipos pluridisciplinares en los que concurren técnicos en computación, diseñadores instruccionales y profesores.

Para desarrollar un patrón se utiliza un “lenguajes de patrón”. Su naturaleza y principales características están descritas como buena parte de este apartado en un artículo dedicado exclusivamete a patrones (Zapata-Ros, 2011), y sobre todo en lo que respoecta a patrones y Pensamiento computacional en otro capítulo de esta obra (Pérez-Paredes y Zapata-Ros, 2018a, b y c)

Un ejemplo notable de desarrollo de patrones y de lenguaje de patrones es el de las wikis. De las cuales la más conocida es Wikipedia. Las wikis constituyen el ejemplo más importante de construcciones utilizando lenguajes de patrón, y de hecho cada wiki se ha desarrollado utilizando un patrón concreto: El patrón de las wikis.

El origen de las wikis está en la comunidad de patrones de diseño Portland Pattern, cuyos integrantes, informáticos las utilizaron para escribir patrones de programa de ordenador. La primera wiki llamada WikiWikiWeb fue creada por Ward Cunningham, quien creó y dio nombre al concepto wiki, además implementó el primer servidor WikiWiki, y con él creó el primer servicio de este tipo, para el repositorio de patrones del Portland (Portland Pattern Repository) en 1995.

En el citado artículo (Zapata-Ros, 2011) reproducimos el método que utilizó Ward Cunningham para diseñar la Wiki original como un ejemplo concreto para expresar los lenguajes de patrón de forma efectiva (http://c2.com/cgi/wiki).

 

Sinéctica.-

La Sinéctica es un punto de confluencia de las teorías que tratan de explicar y estudian la creatividad, de las técnicas de trabajo en grupo como medio para exteriorizar flujos e impulsos que de otra forma no serían observables y por tanto analizados, mejorados y compartidos, y los procesos de sistematización y racionalización de esos flujos e impulsos.

Como consecuencia de esta naturaleza y de estos procesos, la Sinéctica también puede considerarse como una teoría para la resolución de problemas.

Así (Gordon,1961) “la Teoría Sinéctica estudia cómo organizar la integración de los diversos individuos que componen  un grupo para la resolución de problemas. Es pues una teoría operacional que orientada al uso consciente de los mecanismos psicológicos preconscientes que hay presentes en la actividad creadora humana.”

Situationa l Methods of I nstructionReigeluth (2012) considera la Sinéctica dentro de los Métodos Situados de Instrucción.

Una de las posibles dimensiones que puede considerarse al estudiar lPrinciples and methods of instruction can be described on many levels of precision ( Reigeluth & Carr-Chellman, 2009b ) .os principios y los métodos de enseñanza, dice, son los diversos niveles de precisión (Reigeluth y Carr Chellman, 2009b).For example, on the least precise level, Merrill state s that i nstr uction should provide coaching. Por ejemplo, en el nivel menos preciso, Merrill (2009) indica que la instrucción debe provenir del entrenamiento. On a highly precise level, one could state, “when teaching a procedure, if a learner skips a step during a performance of the procedure, the learner should be reminded of the step by asking the lear ner a question that prompts the learner to recognize the omission. ” When we provide more precision in a principle or method of instruction, we usually find that it needs to be different for different situations. En el extremo opuesto, en un nivel de alta precisión, siguiendo con los ejemplos, “al enseñar un procedimiento, si un alumno se salta un paso durante la ejecución del procedimiento, se debe inducir al alumno hacia la identificación del paso omitido mediante preguntas que lo guíen hasta llegar al reconocimiento de la omisión”. De esta manera cuando proporcionamos mayor precisión sobre un principio o sobre un método instruccional, por lo general descubrimos que hace falta que éste sea diferente para diferentes situaciones. Reigeluth ( 1999a ) referred to the contextual factors that influence the effects of methods as “situationalities.” Reigeluth (1999a) se refirió a los factores contextuales que influyen en los efectos de los métodos como “escenarios”. En definitiva se trata de métodos situados.

Reigeluth and Carr-Chellman Reigeluth y Carr-Chellman ( 2009a ) propose that there are two major types of situationalities that call for fundamentally different sets of methods: (2009a) proponen dos principales tipos de escenarios que requieren conjuntos fundamentalmente diferentes de métodos: 1.Situationalities based on different approaches to instruction (means) , Escenarios basados ​​en distintos enfoques de la enseñanza (medios), such as: y eSituationalities based on dif ferent learning outcomes (ends), such as:escenarios basados ​​en diferentes resultados de aprendizaje (fines). Entre los primeros incluye, entre otros, al 1.1.juego de rol  (role-playing), resolución de conflictos, 1.7.Peer learning aprendizaje entre iguales, 1.9. Problem-based learning aprendizaje basado en problemas,  Simulation-based learning aprendizaje por simulación, y también a la Synectics sinéctica

Los capítulosUnits 2 and 3 in Reigeluth and Carr-Chellman’s ( 2009c ) en las Unidades de 2 y 3 del libro de Reigeluth y Carr-Chellman (2009c) “Green Book 3” ( Instructional-Design Theories and Models, Vol. III: Building a Common Knowledge Base ) describe the “common kno wledge base” for nine of those sets of methods. Teorías y Modelos de Diseño  Instruccional, (Volumen III: Construyendo una base de conocimientos en común) describen una “base de conocimientos” para esos conjuntos de métodos.

La Teorías Sinécticas tiene su fuente empírica en las historias de casos que ilustran el uso de mecanismos operativos, que de esta forma se llaman mecanismos sinécticos, y en cómo operan estos en los procedimientos, que se estudian detalladamente, para la organización y funcionamiento de los grupos, llamados grupos sinécticos, fundamentalmente  en contextos industriales. En estos procesos se hace especial énfasis en el papel que juega en la actividad creativa la metáfora y en su análisis.

La sinéctica se ha presentado por sus creadores, y así se ha aceptado, como una metodología de resolución de problemas que estimula los procesos de pensamiento de los cuales el sujeto puede no ser consciente.

Este método fue desarrollado por George M. Prince (5 abril 1918 a 9 junio 2009) y William JJ Gordon , originarios de la Arthur D. Little Unidad Invención Diseño en la década de 1950.

Inicialmente el método consistió en grabar en audio y en vídeo reuniones en las que se hablaba sobre experimentos, su desarrollo y el análisis de los resultados, haciendo interpretaciones de ellos. Después el método se completaba con el análisis de las grabaciones. Se discutía sobre formas alternativas de resolución del problema y se procuraba llegar a soluciones de compromiso sobre lo que se consensuaba como una solución creativa.

Como teoría la Sinéctica nos ofrece procedimientos para utilizar las habilidades creativas, en la resolución de problemas, de una manera racional. De esta forma (Gordon, 1961)  “(…), tradicionalmente, el proceso creativo ha sido considerado después de los hechos. Los estudios sinécticos han intentado investigar el proceso creativo en vivo, mientras que está pasando.”

 

Metacognición.-

En las tareas de codificación los aspectos procedimentales en cómo afrontar un problema y cómo resolverlo por los alumnos adquieren una importancia clave.

Cuando las teorías del aprendizaje incorporan el concepto de estrategias se ve resaltado el carácter procedimental que tiene todo aprendizaje (Esteban y Zapata-Ros, 2008). Con ello además se está aceptado que  los procedimientos utilizados para aprender constituyen una parte muy decisiva del propio aprendizaje y del  resultado final de ese proceso. El concepto de estrategia de aprendizaje es, pues, un concepto que se integra adecuadamente con los principios de la psicología cognitiva, desde la perspectiva constructivista del conocimiento y del aprendizaje. Lo hace además con la importancia atribuida a los elementos procedimentales en el proceso de construcción de conocimientos y, asimismo, teniendo en cuenta aspectos diferenciales de los individuos.

Conviene pues destacar en primer lugar esta visión del aprendizaje de las habilidades propias del pensamiento computacional.

El concepto de estrategia implica una connotación finalista e intencional. Toda estrategia conlleva, de hecho es, un plan de acción para realizar  una tarea que requiera una actividad cognitiva en el aprendizaje. No se trata, por tanto, de la aplicación de una técnica concreta, por ejemplo de aplicar un método de lectura o un algoritmo. Se trata de un plan de actuación que implica habilidades y destrezas –que el individuo ha de poseer previamente- y de una serie de técnicas que se aplican en función de las tareas a desarrollar, sobre las que el alumno decide y sobre las que tiene una intención de utilizar consciente. Por tanto  lo más importante de esta consideración es que para que haya intencionalidad ha de existir conciencia de:

  1. a)la situaciónsobre la que se ha de operar (problema a resolver, datos a analizar, conceptos a relacionar, información a retener, etc.). Esta consciencia y esta intencionalidad presupone, como cuestión clave, la representación de la tarea que se realiza, sobre la que el aprendiz toma la decisión de qué estrategias va a aplicar; y
  2. b)de los propios recursoscon que el aprendiz cuenta, es decir, de sus habilidades, capacidades, destrezas, recursos y de la capacidad de generar otros nuevos o mediante la asociación o reestructuración de otros preexistentes.

En todo esto ha de existir la conciencia de los propios recursos cognitivos con que cuenta el aprendiz. Eso es lo que se ha denominado metacognición.

Así pues no es sólo una estrategia o un conjunto de estrategias. Es la condición necesaria para que pueda darse cualquier plan estratégico. Lo contrario serían simplemente algoritmos o incluso estrategias pero donde, al no haber intencionalidad, no habría la valoración  que conlleva la adopción de un plan con previa deliberación de la situación y de los recursos.

La metacognición y el estudio de los estilos de aprendizaje son dos cosas que van íntimamente ligadas.

Si los alumnos son conscientes, primero, de las limitaciones que tienen en su forma de aprender y, segundo, de la necesidad del cambio de los  procedimientos que utilizan para aprender, o de consolidarlos y potenciarlos, y por último de sus propias capacidades para llevar de forma autónoma ese cambio o de la necesidad de adquirirlas (capacidades metacognitivas) estaríamos en presencia de la cuestión clave para abordar el resto de competencias del pensamiento computacional para la mayor parte de los alumnos.

El argumento para señalar la importancia de la metacognición, su papel clave, en palabras de David Merrill (2000) es que la mayoría de los estudiantes no son conscientes de sus estilos de aprendizaje y si se deja a sus propios medios, no es probable que empiecen a aprender de nuevas maneras. Por lo tanto, el conocimiento de los estilos de aprendizaje de uno mismo puede ser utilizado para aumentar la auto-conciencia acerca de las fortalezas y debilidades como aprendices que cada uno tiene y por consiguiente para mejorar en el aprendizaje.

Si bien todas las ventajas que se atribuyen a la metacognición (ser consciente de los propios procesos de pensamiento y aprendizaje) pueden ser adquiridas alentando a los estudiantes a adquirir conocimientos acerca de su propio aprendizaje y el de los demás (Coffield, et. Al., 2004), lo importante es estudiar e investigar cómo los alumnos pueden adquirir este conocimientos, formar en habilidades cognitivas.

En el caso del pensamiento computacional la cuestión es cómo los estudiantes pueden adquirir las habilidades metacognitivas específicas, cuáles son las mejores estrategias y cómo pueden detectar cuales son las debilidades y las fortalezas de sus propios estilos y cambiarlas o potenciarlas.

Establecer en qué medida es posible formar en estas habilidades y cómo llevar a cabo este meta-aprendizaje.

 

Cinestesia

La cinestesia es la rama de la ciencia que estudia el movimiento humano. Hay aspectos cognitivos y representativos: Es un saber que trata cómo se percibe el esquema corporal, el equilibrio, el espacio y el tiempo. También es una habilidad.

Hay una lógica sensorial que nace de la “sensación o percepción del movimiento, del espacio, del tiempo y de la propia posición”.  Así nace el concepto de velocidad instantánea, y constructos como son la derivada y la diferencial en matemáticas. La tortuga de Logo vincula esta lógica con el aprendizaje de la geometría (Solomon y Paper, 1976).

En el Seminario Smart University 4.0, en la edición de 2015, organizado  por la Universidad Internacional Menéndez Pelayo (UIPM) tuve el privilegio de coincidir con Theresa Zabell, bimedallísta  olímpica española en vela, que,  cuando le hablé del pensamiento computacional y le conté mis dudas sobre incluir la cinestesia, me convenció contándome una experiencia. Theresa es además informática. Su opinión es pues autorizada.

La deportista, en la competencia y en los entrenamientos, se colocaba una cinta en la cabeza que le sujetaba el cabello, dejándole el rostro muy despejado. Incluso era muy meticulosa en esta tarea. No dejaba que ningún mechoncillo o cabello se escapase de esa sujeción. Todo el mundo se preguntaba el porqué de aquello que muchos consideraban una manía.

La razón era que quería percibir con toda precisión la dirección e intensidad el viento, y mediante un mecanismo de coordinación sensorio motriz, e imagino que con alguna mediación cognitiva previa y automatizada pero muy interactiva, y en función de esa percepción utilizar el timón orientando el rumbo del barco para aprovechar al máximo la fuerza del viento.

Esta habilidad como ponen de relieve los creadores de LOGO, tiene especial importancia a la hora de percibir ciertas propiedades en geometría y robótica, que intervienen en aspectos de programación de estas áreas.

Así pues con la sinéctica  concluimos la propuesta de los quince elementos/ componentes del pensamiento computacional reseñados en la fig. 2

Queda por desarrollar pormenorizadamente los contenidos en un corpus útil a las distintas modalidades y niveles de formación, así como para la formación de maestros y profesores que los impartan.

[1] La descripción que presentamos está obtenida, salvo giros y adaptaciones al formato de paper, del post Enseñanza Universitaria en línea: MOOC, aprendizaje divergente y creatividad (II) (Zapata-Ros, 2014a))

[2] Esta descripción está prácticamente trascrita adaptada del post de RED-Hypotheses Enseñanza Universitaria en línea: MOOC, aprendizaje divergente y creatividad (III) (Zapata-Ros, 2014b)

Referencias.-

Alexander, C., Ishikawa, S., Silverstein, M., Jacobson, M., Fiksdahl-King, I., & Angel, S. (1977). A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction (Center for Environmental Structure).

Alexander et al., 1977, A Pattern Language, Oxford University Press, px.

Ausubel, D. P. (1963). The psychology of meaningful verbal learning; an introduction to school learning. New York: Grune & Stratton.

ANDERSON, J.A. (1993) Rules of the Mind (Hillsdale, NJ, Erlbaum).

Arraki, K., Blair, K., Bürgert, T., Greenling, J., Haebe, J., Lee, G., Peel, A., Szczepanski, V., Pontelli, E. and Hug, S. (2014, October). DISSECT: An experiment in infusing computational thinking in K-12 science curricula. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2014 IEEE (pp. 1-9). IEEE.

Baker, M., Hansen, T., Joiner, R., & Traum, D. (1999). The role of grounding in collaborative learning tasks. In P. Dillenbourg (Ed.), Collaborative Learning: Cognitive and Computational Approaches. (pp. 31-63; 223-225). Elsevier Science.http://www.uio.no/studier/emner/matnat/ifi/TOOL5100/v08/leseliste/F9/baker99role.pdf

Balanskat, A.  & Engelhardt , K. (October, 2014). Computing our future Computer programming and coding – Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe.  European Schoolnet (EUN Partnership AISBL) http://www.eun.org/c/document_library/get_file?uuid=521cb928-6ec4-4a86-b522-9d8fd5cf60ce&groupId=43887

Balanskat, A.  & Engelhardt , K. (October, 2015). Computing our future Computer programming and coding – Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe.  European Schoolnet (EUN Partnership AISBL)

Bargury, I. Z., Muller, O., Haberman, B., Zohar, D., Cohen, A., Levy, D., & Hotoveli, R. (2012, October). Implementing a new computer science curriculum for middle school in Israel. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2012 (pp. 1-6). IEEE. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/6462365/   y   https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Dalit_Levy/publication/261196400_Implementing_a_new_Computer_Science_Curriculum_for_middle_school_in_Israel/links/5605989108ae8e08c08c9079/Implementing-a-new-Computer-Science-Curriculum-for-middle-school-in-Israel.pdf en abierto.

Bawden, D. (2001). Information and digital literacies: a review of concepts. Journal of Documentation, 57(2), 218–259.

Bawden, D. (2008). Origins and concepts of digital literacy. Digital literacies: Concepts, policies and practices, 17-32. http://sites.google.com/site/colinlankshear/DigitalLiteracies.pdf#page=19

Bell, T., Alexander, J., Freeman, I., & Grimley, M. (2009). Computer science unplugged: School students doing real computing without computers. The New Zealand Journal of Applied Computing and Information Technology13(1), 20-29. http://www.computingunplugged.org/sites/default/files/papers/Unplugged-JACIT2009submit.pdf

Bell, T., Andreae, P., & Robins, A. (2014). A case study of the introduction of computer science in NZ schools. ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE)14(2), 10. https://ir.canterbury.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10092/10570/12652431_NZ-case-study-TOCE-v5.pdf?sequence=1  y  https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2602485

Bergin, J. (2008) Pedagogical Patterns Project [en línea]. Disponible en: http://www.pedagogicalpatterns.org/

Blikstein,  (2013). Seymour Papert’s Legacy: Thinking About Learning, and Learning About Thinking. https://tltl.stanford.edu/content/seymour-papert-s-legacy-thinking-about-learning-and-learning-about-thinking

Bono, E. D. (1968). New think: the use of lateral thinking in the generation of new ideas. Basic Books.

Bono, E. D. (1970). Lateral Thinking. A Textbook of Creativity. Londres: Ward Lock Educational.

Bono, E. DE (1986):El pensamiento lateral: manual de creatividad. Editorial Paidós.

Bloom, B.S. (1984). The 2 Sigma Problem: The Search for Methods of Group Instruction as ffective as One-to-One Tutoring, Educational Researcher, 13:6 (4-16). http://www.comp.dit.ie/dgordon/Courses/ILT/ILT0004/TheTwoSigmaProblem.pdf

Bocconi, S. et al (2016). Developing Computational Thinking in Compulsory Education. Implications for policy and practice.   http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/bitstream/JRC104188/jrc104188_computhinkreport.pdf

Burgett, T., Folk, R., Fulton, J., Peel, A., Pontelli, E. and Szczepanski, V. (2015, October). DISSECT: Analysis of pedagogical techniques to integrate computational thinking into K-12 curricula. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2015. 32614 2015. IEEE (pp. 1-9). IEEE.

Carvalho, T., Andrade, D., Silveira, J., Auler, V., Cavalheiro, S., Aguiar, M., Foss, L., Pernas, A. and Reiser, R., 2013, October. Discussing the challenges related to deployment of computational thinking in brazilian basic education. In Theoretical Computer Science (WEIT), 2013 2nd Workshop-School on (pp. 111-115). IEEE. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Marilton_Aguiar/publication/268240422_Discussing_the_Challenges_Related_to_Deployment_of_Computational_Thinking_in_Brazilian_Basic_Education/links/54abd8080cf2bce6aa1dbf62.pdf y http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/6778575/

Caspersen, M. E., & Nowack, P. (2013, January). Computational thinking and practice: A generic approach to computing in Danish high schools. In Proceedings of the Fifteenth Australasian Computing Education Conference-Volume 136 (pp. 137-143). Australian Computer Society, Inc. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2667214 y en abierto http://cs.au.dk/~mic/publications/conference/41–ace2013.pdf

Chiprianov, V., & Gallon, L. (2016, July). Introducing Computational Thinking to K-5 in a French Context. In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (pp. 112-117). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2899439

Clark, D. (2014) Learning Styles & Preferences. http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/styles.html

Coffield, F., Moseley, D., Hall, E., Ecclestone, K. (2004). Learning Styles and Pedagogy in Post-16 Learning: A systematic and critical review. www.LSRC.ac.uk: Learning and Skills Research Centre. Retrieved from: http://www.lsda.org.uk/files/PDF/1543.pdf

Constantinidou, F., Baker, S. (2002). Stimulus modality and verbal learning performance in normal aging. Brain and Language, 82(3), 296-311.

Corballis, M. C. (2007). Pensamiento recursivo. Mente y cerebro, 27, 78-87. http://amscimag.sigmaxi.org/4Lane/ForeignPDF/2007-05CorballisSpanish.pdf

Corballis, M. C. (2014). The recursive mind: The origins of human language, thought, and civilization. Princeton University Press. http://press.princeton.edu/titles/9424.html

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1996). Creativity: Flow and the psychology of discovery and invention.

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2009). Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and invengtion. Harper Collins.

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1998). Creatividad: el fluir y la psicología del descubrimiento y la invención. Ed. Paidós.

DeLano, D.E. y  Rising, L. (1997).  Introducing Technology into the Workplace. Proceedings  PLoP’97 Conference. Consultado en http://hillside.net/plop/plop97/Proceedings/delano.pdf

Dillenbourg, P. (1999). What do you mean by collaborative learning?.Collaborative-learning: Cognitive and Computational Approaches., 1-19. https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/file/index/docid/190240/filename/Dillenbourg-Pierre-1999.pdf

Dorn, R. I. (December, 2016) Computer Science K–12 Learning Standards Adoption Statement. http://www.k12.wa.us/ComputerScience/pubdocs/ComputerScienceStandards.pdf

Duncan, C., & Bell, T. (2015, November). A pilot computer science and programming course for primary school students. In Proceedings of the Workshop in Primary and Secondary Computing Education (pp. 39-48). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2818328

Eggleston, J. (1982). Sociología del currículum. Ed. Troquel. Buenos Aires.

Esteban, M. y Zapata, M. (2008, Enero). Estrategias de aprendizaje y eLearning. Un apunte para la fundamentación del diseño educativo en los entornos virtuales de aprendizaje. Consideraciones para la reflexión y el debate. Introducción al estudio de las es trategias y estilos de aprendizaje. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, número 19. Consultado (día/mes/año) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/19

Eshet, Y. (2002). Digital literacy: A new terminology framework and its application to the design of meaningful technology-based learning environments, In P. Barker and S. Rebelsky (Eds.), Proceedings of the World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecomunications, 493–498 Chesapeake VA: AACE, Retrieved November 30, 2007, from http://infosoc.haifa.ac.il/DigitalLiteracyEshet.doc

Eshet-Alkalai, Y. (2004), Digital literacy: a conceptual framework for survival skills in the digital era, Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 139(1), 93–106. Available at: http://www.openu.ac.il/Personal_sites/download/Digital-literacy2004-JEMH.pdf

Fitch, T., Hauser, M. & Chomsky, N.  2005.  The evolution of the language faculty:      Clarifications and implications.   Cognition. 97.179-210

Fricke, A. y Voelter, M. (2000). SEMINARS: A Pedagogical Pattern Language about teaching seminars, [en línea]. Proceding EuroPLoP 2000. Disponible en: http://www.voelter.de/publications/seminars.html [2008, 2 diciembre].

Gilster, P. (1997). Digital literacy. New York: Wiley.

Gordon, W. J. (1961). Synectics: The development of creative capacity.

Grover, S., Cooper, S., & Pea, R. (2014, June). Assessing computational learning in K-12. In Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Innovation & technology in computer science education (pp. 57-62). ACM. https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/41163349/Assessing_computational_learning_in_K-1220160114-23479-hj8516.pdf

Grover, S., Pea, R., & Cooper, S. (2016, February). Factors influencing computer science learning in middle school. In Proceedings of the 47th ACM technical symposium on computing science education (pp. 552-557). ACM.  http://life-slc.org/docs/LSLC_rp_A211_Grover-Pea-Cooper-SIGSCE2016.pdf

Grover, S., Pea, R., & Cooper, S. (2015). Designing for deeper learning in a blended computer science course for middle school students. Computer Science Education25(2), 199-237. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08993408.2015.1033142 y https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/4f37/83f96f0c4aa579d5eea160ff56c15f5e7c85.pdf

Hauser, M., Chomsky, N.,  & Fitch, T.  2002.  The faculty of language: what is it, who has it, and how did it evolve. Science 198. 1569-79

Hackenberg, A. J. (2007). Units coordination and the construction of improper fractions: A revision of the splitting hypothesis. Journal of Mathematical Behavior, 26(1), 27–47.

Hansen, T., Dirckinck-Holmfeld, L., Lewis, R., & Rugelj, J. (1999). Using telematics to support collaborative knowledge construction. Collaborative learning: Cognitive and computational approaches, 169-196.http://www.researchgate.net/publication/228559912_Using_telematics_to_support_collaborative_knowledge_construction/file/60b7d523962ffc2db3.pdf

Hayman-Abello SE, Warriner EM (2002). (2002). Child clinical/pediatric neuropsychology: some recent advances. Annual review of psychology,53(1), 309-339.

Himanen, P. (2002). La ética del hacker y el espíritu de la era de la información.http://eprints.rclis.org/12851/

Jenkins, J.T., Jerkins, J.A. and Stenger, C.L. (2012), March. A plan for immediate immersion of computational thinking into the high school math classroom through a partnership with the alabama math, science, and technology initiative. In Proceedings of the 50th Annual Southeast Regional Conference (pp. 148-152). ACM.

Jonassen, D., Davidson, M., Collins, M., Campbell, J., & Haag, B. B. (1995). Constructivism and computer‐mediated communication in distance education.American journal of distance education9(2), 7-26. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08923649509526885

Jovanov, M., Stankov, E., Mihova, M., Ristov, S., & Gusev, M. (2016, April). Computing as a new compulsory subject in the Macedonian primary schools curriculum. In Global Engineering Education Conference (EDUCON), 2016 IEEE (pp. 680-685). IEEE. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/7474623/

Keefe, J.W. (1979) Learning style: An overview. NASSP’s Student learning styles: Diagnosing and proscribing programs (pp. 1-17). Reston, VA. National Association of Secondary School Principles..

Koch, T., & Denike, K. (2009). Crediting his critics’ concerns: Remaking John Snow’s map of Broad Street cholera, 1854. Social science & medicine69(8), 1246-1251.http://www.albany.edu/faculty/fboscoe/papers/koch2009.pdf

Lanham, R.A. (1995). Digital literacy, Scientifi c American, 273(3), 160–161.

Lankshear, C. and Knobel, M. (2006). Digital literacies: policy, pedagogy and research considerations for education. Digital Kompetanse: Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, 1(1), 12–24.

Leeder, D., Boyle, T., Morales, R., Wharrad, H., & Garrud, P. (2004). To boldly GLO-towards the next generation of Learning Objects. In World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (Vol. 2004, No. 1, pp. 28-33).

Liu, J., Hasson, E. P., Barnett, Z. D., & Zhang, P. (2011, October). A survey on computer science K-12 outreach: teacher training programs. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2011 (pp. T4F-1). IEEE. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/6143111/

Lockwood, J., & Mooney, A. (2017). Computational Thinking in Education: Where does it Fit? A systematic literary review. arXiv preprint arXiv:1703.07659.

Mack, N. K. (2001). Building on informal knowledge through instruction in a complex content domain: Partitioning, units, and understanding multiplication of fractions. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 32(3), 267–296.

Mandelbrot, B. (1982). The fractal geometry of nature. W. H. Freeman.

Mandelbrot, B. (1977). Fractals, form, chance and dimension. W. H. Freeman.

Marzano, R.J. (1998). A theory-based meta-analysis of research on instruction. Mid-continent Regional Educational Laboratory, Aurora, CO.

Merrill, D. (2000). Instructional Strategies and Learning Styles: Which takes Precedence? Trends and Issues in Instructional Technology, R. Reiser and J. Dempsey (Eds.). Prentice Hall.

Merrill, M. D. (2009). First principles of instruction. In C. M. Reigeluth & A. A. Carr-Chellman (Eds.), Instructional-design theories and models: Building a common knowledge base (Vol. III, pp. 41-56). New York: Routledge.

Mensing, K., Mak, J., Bird, M., & Billings, J. (2013, October). Computational, model thinking and computer coding for US Common Core Standards with 6 to 12 year old students. In Emerging eLearning Technologies and Applications (ICETA), 2013 IEEE 11th International Conference on (pp. 17-22). IEEE.

Miller, R. B., Kelly, G. N., & Kelly, J. T. (1988). Effects of Logo computer programming experience on problem solving and spatial relations ability. Contemporary Educational Psychology13(4), 348-357. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0361476X88900343

MONTESSORI, M. (1928). Antropología Pedagógica. Barcelona: Araluce

MONTESSORI, M. (1937). Método de la Pedagogía Científica. Barcelona: Araluce

MONTESSORI, M. (1935). Manual práctico del método. Barcelona: Araluce

Mooney, A., Duffin, J., Naughton, T., Monahan, R., Power, J. and Maguire, P. (2014). PACT: An initiative to introduce computational thinking to second-level education in Ireland.

Nesiba, N., Pontelli, E. and Staley, T., (2015, October). DISSECT: Exploring the relationship between computational thinking and English literature in K-12 curricula. In Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2015. 32614 2015. IEEE (pp. 1- 8). IEEE.

Papert, S. (1980). Mindstorms: Children, computers, and powerful ideas. Basic Books, Inc. http://www.arvindguptatoys.com/arvindgupta/mindstorms.pdf

Pérez-Paredes, P. y  Zapata-Ros, M. (2018a).  Patrones de Pensamiento Computacional y corpus lingüísticos: el aprendizaje de lenguas con datos lingüísticos (Preprint). http://eprints.rclis.org/32209/

Pérez-Paredes, P. y  Zapata-Ros, M. (2018b).  Patrones de Pensamiento Computacional y corpus lingüísticos: el aprendizaje de lenguas con datos lingüísticos (I).  RED de Hypotheses.  https://red.hypotheses.org/1025

Pérez-Paredes, P. y  Zapata-Ros, M. (2018c).  Patrones de Pensamiento Computacional y corpus lingüísticos: el aprendizaje de lenguas con datos lingüísticos (y II).  RED de Hypotheses. https://red.hypotheses.org/1045

Piaget, J. (1947). La psychologie de l’intelligence [The psychology of intelligence]. http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203278895

Piaget, J. (1972). Psicología de la inteligencia. Editorial Psique. Buenos Aires.

Piaget, J. (1977). The role of action in the development of thinking. In Knowledge and development (pp. 17-42). Springer US.

Pólya, George (1945). How to Solve It. Princeton University Press.

Pólya, G. (1989). Como plantear y resolver problemas Ed. Trillas. (Primera edición 1965)

Popper, Karl (1934).«The Logic of Scientific Discovery». Consultado el 08-09-2007. http://books.google.es/books?hl=es&lr=&id=LWSBAgAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PP1&dq=popper+scientific+methods

Popper, Karl (1934). La lógica de la investigación científica. Traducido por Víctor Sánchez de Zavala (1ª edición). Madrid: Editorial Tecnos (publicado el 1962). ISBN 84-309-0711-4..

Popper, Karl (1934). The Logic of Scientific Discovery. New York: Routledge (publicado el 2009).

Olive, J., & Vomvoridi, E. (2006). Making sense of instruction on fractions when a student lacks necessary fractional schemes: The case of Tim. Journal of Mathematical Behavior 25(1), 18–45.

Raja, T. (2014). We can code it!. http://www.motherjones.com/media/2014/06/computer-science-programming-code-diversity-sexism-education.

Reigeluth, C. M. (2012). Instructional theory and technology for the new paradigm of education. RED, Revista de Educación a distancia32, 1-18. http://www.um.es/ead/red/32/reigeluth.pdf.

Reigeluth, C. M., & Carr-Chellman, A. A. (2009a). Situational principles of instruction. In C. M. Reigeluth & A. A. Carr-Chellman (Eds.), Instructional-design theories and models: Building a common knowledge base (Vol. III, pp. 57-68). New York: Routledge.

Ribeiro, L., Nunes, D.J., Da Cruz, M.K. and Matos, E.D.S., 2013, October. Computational Thinking: Possibilities and Challenges. In Theoretical Computer Science (WEIT), 2013 2nd Workshop-School on (pp. 22-25). IEEE.  http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/6778560/ y http://www.computacional.com.br/arquivos/Gerais/RIBEIRO%20-%20Computational%20Thinking%20-%20Possibilities%20and%20Challenges.pdf

Rosas, M. J. M. (2012). Recensión de “The recursive mind. The origins of human language, thought, and civilization”, de Michael C. Corballis. Teorema: Revista internacional de filosofía, 31(1), 151-154. http://dialnet.unirioja.es/descarga/articulo/4349918.pdf

Salomon, G. (1993). Distributed cognitions. Psychological and educational considerations (pp. 111-138) Cambridge, USA: Cambridge University Press.

Sentance, S., Dorling, M., & McNicol, A. (2013, February). Computer science in secondary schools in the UK: Ways to empower teachers. In International Conference on Informatics in Schools: Situation, Evolution, and Perspectives (pp. 15-30). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/44b0/074bd6fc438a459638f029667ff1ff79d9dd.pdf en abierto y https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-36617-8_2

Siemens, G. (December 12, 2004). Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital AgeConsultado el 18/8/2011 en http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.87.3793&rep=rep1&type=pdf el 30/08/2012

Silva, R. (2014). START CODING THIS YEAR IT’S EASIER THAN YOU THINK. http://yearofcode.org/

Steffe, L. P., & Olive, J. (2010). Children’s fractional knowledge. Springer: New York.

Steffe, L. P. (2004). On the construction of learning trajectories of children: The case of commensurate fractions. Mathematical Thinking and Learning, 6(2), 129–162

Steffen, J. H. (2008). Optimal boarding method for airline passengers. Journal of Air Transport Management14(3), 146-150. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969699708000239

Stewart, K.L., Felicetti, L.A. (1992). Learning styles of marketing majors. Educational Research Quarterly, 15(2), 15-23.

Sysło, M. M., & Kwiatkowska, A. B. (2015, September). Introducing a new computer science curriculum for all school levels in Poland. In International Conference on Informatics in Schools: Situation, Evolution, and Perspectives (pp. 141-154). Springer, Cham. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-25396-1_13

Thompson, D., & Bell, T. (2013, November). Adoption of new computer science high school standards by New Zealand teachers. In Proceedings of the 8th Workshop in Primary and Secondary Computing Education (pp. 87-90). ACM. https://itp.nz/files/wipsce-teachers-2013.pdf y https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2532759

Thompson-Schill, S., Kraemer, D., Rosenberg, L. (2009). Visual Learners Convert Words To Pictures In The Brain And Vice Versa, Says Psychology Study. University of Pennsylvania. News article retrieved from http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/news/visual-learners-convert-words-pictures-brain-and-vice-versa-says-penn-psychology-study

Valverde-Berrocoso, J., Fernández-Sánchez, M.R., Garrido-Arroyo, M.C. (2015). El pensamiento computacional y las nuevas ecologías del aprendizaje. RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia. Número 46. Número monográfico sobre «Pensamiento Computacional». Septiembre de 2015. Consultado el (dd/mm/aa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/46

Washington, US Congress of Technology Assessment, OTA CIT-235 (April 1984). Computerized Manufacturing Automation: Employment, Education and the Workplace, page 234. http://ota-cdn.fas.org/reports/8408.pdf

Werner, L., Denner, J., Campe, S., & Kawamoto, D. C. (2012, February). The fairy performance assessment: measuring computational thinking in middle school. In Proceedings of the 43rd ACM technical symposium on Computer Science Education(pp. 215-220). ACM. https://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/courses/compsci747s2c/lectures/wernerFairyComputationalThinkingAssessment.pdf   y   https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2157200

Wilkins, J. L. M., & Norton, A. (2011). The splitting loope. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 42(4), 386–416

Wilkins, J. L., Norton, A., & Boyce, S. J. (2013). Validating a Written Instrument for Assessing Students’ Fractions Schemes and Operations. Mathematics Educator, 22(2), 31-54.

Wing, J.M. (March 2006). Computational Thinking. It represents a universally applicable attitude and skill set everyone, not just computer scientists, would be eager to learn and use. COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM /Vol. 49, No. 3. https://www.cs.cmu.edu/~15110-s13/Wing06-ct.pdf

Wood, D., & Wood, H. (1996). Vygotsky, tutoring and learning. Oxford review of Education, 22(1), 5-16. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1050800

Wood, D., & Wood, H. (1996). Vygotsky, tutoring and learning. Oxford review of Education22(1), 5-16. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0305498960220101#.VI3EvyuG-_l

Zapata-Ros, M. (1996a). Integración de la GEOMETRÍA FRACTAL en las Matemáticas, y en la Informática, de Secundaria. http://platea.pntic.mec.es/~mzapata/tutor_ma/fractal/fracuned.htm# Pero… ¿qué son los fractales?

Zapata-Ros, M. et al (1996b). Integración de la GEOMETRÍA FRACTAL en las Matemáticas, y en la Informática, de Secundaria.  Materiales para la Enseñanza Secundaria: área de Matemáticas y área de Educación FísicaDocumentos CEP . Núm. 47. CEP Murcia II. http://hdl.handle.net/11162/645.

Zapata-Ros, M. (2009): Objetos de aprendizaje generativos, competencias individuales, agrupamientos de competencias y adaptatividad . RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, número monográfico X. Consultado (DD/MM/AA) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/M10. Pág. 5.

Zapata-Ros, M. (2011). Patrones en elearning. Elementos y referencias para la formación. 15 de julio de 2011. RED, Revista de Educación a Distancia. Número 27. Consultado el [dd/mm/aaaa] en http://www.um.es/ead/red/27/

Zapata-Ros, M. (2012). La Sociedad Postindustrial del Conocimiento. Un enfoque multidisciplinar desde la perspectiva de los nuevos métodos para organizar el aprendizaje. Amazon. Consultado en http://www.amazon.es/Sociedad-Postindustrial-del-Conocimiento-multidisciplinar/dp/1492180580.

Zapata-Ros, M. (2013a).  ¿Por qué nos gustan las cosas hermosas? La belleza está escrita en lenguaje matemático mucho antes de que se descubra. Blog Redes Abiertas. http://redesabiertas.blogspot.com.es/2013/03/por-que-nos-gustan-las-cosas-hermosas.html

Zapata-Ros, M. (2013b). El “problema de 2 sigma” y el aprendizaje ayudado por la tecnología en la Educación Universitaria. http://red.hypotheses.org/287 Zapata-Ros, M. (2014). La fundamentación teórica y científica del conectivismo. RED-Hypotheses. http://red.hypotheses.org/688

Zapata-Ros, M. (2014a). Enseñanza Universitaria en línea: MOOC, aprendizaje divergente y creatividad (II).RED-Hypotheses. http://red.hypotheses.org/416

Zapata-Ros, M. (2014b). Enseñanza Universitaria en línea: MOOC, aprendizaje divergente y creatividad (II).RED-Hypotheses. http://red.hypotheses.org/427

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia. Número 46.  15 de Septiembre de 2015. Consultado el (dd/mm/aa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/46

Zur-Bargury, I. (2012, July). A new curriculum for junior-high in computer science. In Proceedings of the 17th ACM annual conference on Innovation and technology in computer science education (pp. 204-208). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2325347

Zur-Bargury, I., Pârv, B., & Lanzberg, D. (2013, July). A nationwide exam as a tool for improving a new curriculum. In Proceedings of the 18th ACM conference on Innovation and technology in computer science education (pp. 267-272). ACM. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2462479.

 

Pensamiento computacional. Una tercera competencia clave (III): ¿Qué es el Pensamiento Computacional? Una definición.

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Alcalá

Ésta es la tercera entrada de una serie que, en conjunto, constituirán un capítulo de un libro que será  publicado por la editorial de la Universidad Católica de Santa María de Arequipa (Perú) con el título “El pensamiento computacional: La nueva alfabetización de las culturas digitales”.

En las anteriores entradas se plantea que el pensamiento computacional  debe constituir una tercera competencia clave dentro del curriculum escolar junto con la Lengua y las Matemáticas, y qué son las alfabetizaciones y las culturas digitales

Definición de Pensamiento Computacional

Tras lo visto sobre Alfabetización Digital y conceptos asociados podemos abordar directamente la idea de pensamiento computacional.

Una primera aproximación a ese concepto es la que hace la informática Tasneem Raja (2014) en el post We Can Code It! , de la revista-blog Mother Jones:

“El enfoque computacional se basa en ver el mundo como una serie de puzzles, a los que se puede romper en trozos más pequeños y resolver poco a poco a través de la lógica y el razonamiento deductivo”.

Esta es una forma intuitiva en la que una autora, que proviene del mundo computacional, aborda una serie de métodos ampliamente conocidos en el mundo de la psicología del aprendizaje. Implícitamente está hablando de análisis descendente y de elaboración: Puzzles —problemas— que se pueden dividir en puzzles—otros problemas— más pequeños, para ir resolviéndolos. También, en el mismo párrafo, vemos una alusión implícita a la recursividad. Aunque falta la cláusula de parada y la vuelta atrás, porque evidentemente después de armar los puzzles pequeños, cada uno de ellos, hay que ensamblarlos en el puzzle general. Y también habrá que decir en qué nivel habrá que parar y dar marcha atrás.

Sin embargo, aunque todo el mundo la cita, no es  una buena definición. En general no es una definición es simplemente una cercamiento, eso sí afortunado al problema. Tampoco aborda la cuestión de una forma mínimamente estructurada o sistemática, ni con la complejidad que requiere, como veremos.

Hay otros procedimientos para abordar tareas complejas que igualmente se pueden considerar como propias de este pensamiento, como son el análisis ascendente, y todo lo que constituye la heurística, el pensamiento divergente o lateral, la creatividad, la resolución de problemas, el pensamiento abstracto, la recursividad, la iteración, los métodos por aproximaciones sucesivas, el ensayo-error, los métodos colaborativos, el entender cosas juntos, etc. que veremos en lo que sigue.

La definición de pensamiento computacional que se considera la más apropiada, y la que a falta de otra utilizaremos, es la que dió Jeannette Wing (Wing, March 2006), vicepresidente corporativo de Microsoft Research y profesora de Computer Science Department Carnegie Mellon University , que fue quien popularizó el término en su artículo “Computational Thinking. It represents a universally applicable attitude and skill set everyone, not just computer scientists, would be eager to learn and use”, cuyo título es en sí mismo una definición.

Wing dice que el “pensamiento computacional” es una forma de pensar que no es sólo para programadores. Y lo define:

“El pensamiento computacional consiste en la resolución de problemas, el diseño de los sistemas, y la comprensión de la conducta humana haciendo uso de los conceptos fundamentales de la informática”.

En ese mismo artículo continúa diciendo que

“esas son habilidades útiles para todo el mundo, no sólo para los científicos de la computación”.

Pero lo más interesante y lo que nos dio el método para trabajar en el artículo precedente de este trabajo (Zapata-Ros, 2015), es que describe una serie de rasgos que nos van a ser muy útiles para continuar con el trabajo de construir un corpus curricular para el aprendizaje basado en el pensamiento computacional. Así por ejemplo se dice:

  • En el pensamiento computacional se conceptualiza, no se programa.- Es preciso pensar como un científico de la computación. Se requiere un pensamiento en múltiples niveles de abstracción;
  • En el pensamiento computacional  son fundamentales las habilidades no memorísticas o no mecánicas.– Memoria significa mecánico, aburrido, rutinario. Para programar los computadores hace falta una mente imaginativa e inteligente. Hace falta la emoción de la creatividad. Esto es muy parecido al pensamiento divergente, tal como lo concibieron Polya (1989) y Bono (1986).
  • En el pensamiento computacional se complementa y se combina el pensamiento matemático con la ingeniería.- Ya que, al igual que todas las ciencias, la computación tiene sus fundamentos formales en las matemáticas. La ingeniería nos proporciona la filosofía base de  que construimos sistemas que interactúan con el mundo real.
  • En el pensamiento computacional lo importante son las ideas, no los artefactos. Quedan descartados por tanto la fascinación y los espejismos por las novedades tecnológicas. Y mucho menos estos factores como elementos determinantes de la resolución de problemas o de la elección de caminos para resolverlos.

Wing (March 2006) continua con una serie de rasgos, pero lo interesante ahora, con ser importante, no es esta perspectiva en sí, sino, en el contexto de un análisis y de una elaboración interdisciplinar, ver las implicaciones que tienen estas ideas para una redefinición de un dominio teórico específico dentro de las teorías del aprendizaje. Eso por un lado, y por otro encontrar un currículum adecuado a esos dominios conceptuales para las distintas etapas educativas y para la capacitación de maestros y profesores.

Un dominio teórico específico del pensamiento computacional en las teorías del aprendizaje y un currículum.

Siguiendo los trabajos de Eggleston (1980), en el artículo publicado en el número monográfico de RED sobre Pensamiento Computacional (Zapata-Ros, 2015), basado en la necesidad de contar con un corpus curricular, y que ahora resumimos, establecimos una relación de habilidades y de elementos más o menos complejos de desarrollo cognitivos asociados al Pensamiento Computacional y que en conjunto lo definen

Así lo planteamos, en el contexto de un análisis y de una elaboración interdisciplinar, viendo las implicaciones que tienen estas ideas para una redefinición de un dominio teórico específico dentro de las teorías del aprendizaje. Y desde luego con la intención de definir descriptivamente, en un primer acercamiento, un currículum adecuado a esos dominios conceptuales para las distintas etapas educativas y para la capacitación de maestros y profesores.

Esto es lo que en una primera aproximación hicimos con las limitaciones de un tratamiento general, pero que ahora estamos tratando de ampliar y de documentar, así como recoger las aportaciones que n los desarrollos prácticos e institucionales se están produciendo. Este es el sentido pues que tiene este trabajo.

En primer lugar resumimos las siguientes componentes del pensamiento computacional, tal como las definimos en el primer trabajo (Zapata-Ros, 2015):

Fig. 2

Volviendo al problema de la definición del Pensamiento Computacional, podemos establecer la siguiente, uniendo y completando las ideas de David Bawden (2008, Capítulo 1) con la definición de  Jeannette Wing (Wing, March 2006) y con lo analizado el trabajo que precede al presente (Zapata-Ros, 2015):

El pensamiento computacional consiste en la resolución de problemas, el diseño de los sistemas, y la comprensión de la conducta y de las actividades humanas haciendo uso de conceptos y procedimientos básicos para el trabajo y la elaboración de programas y algoritmos en la informática, valiéndose para ello de habilidades específicas y de técnicas necesarias para estos objetivos, que en conjunto constituyen  la base de la cultura digital. Entre estas habilidades y técnicas se identifican las quince siguientes: Análisis ascendente, análisis descendente, heurística, pensamiento divergente, creatividad, resolución de problemas, pensamiento abstracto, recursividad, iteración, métodos por aproximaciones sucesivas (Ensayo – error), métodos colaborativos, patrones, sinéctica, metacognición y cinestesia.

 

En la entrada siguiente procederemos pues a una descripción sucinta de cada uno de estos elementos.

Referencias

Bawden, D. (2008). Origins and concepts of digital literacy. Digital literacies: Concepts, policies and practices, 17-32. http://sites.google.com/site/colinlankshear/DigitalLiteracies.pdf#page=19

Bono, E. D. (1968). New think: the use of lateral thinking in the generation of new ideas. Basic Books.

Eggleston, J. (1982). Sociología del currículum. Ed. Troquel. Buenos Aires.

Pólya, George (1945). How to Solve It. Princeton University Press.

Pólya, G. (1989). Como plantear y resolver problemas Ed. Trillas. (Primera edición 1965)

Raja, T. (2014). We can code it!. http://www.motherjones.com/media/2014/06/computer-science-programming-code-diversity-sexism-education.

Wing, J.M. (March 2006). Computational Thinking. It represents a universally applicable attitude and skill set everyone, not just computer scientists, would be eager to learn and use. COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM /Vol. 49, No. 3. https://www.cs.cmu.edu/~15110-s13/Wing06-ct.pdf

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia. Número 46.  15 de Septiembre de 2015. Consultado el (dd/mm/aa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/46

Pensamiento computacional. Una tercera competencia clave (II): Alfabetizaciones y culturas digitales.

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Alcalá

Ésta es la segunda entrada de una serie que, en conjunto, constituirán un capítulo de un libro que será  publicado por la editorial de la Universidad Católica de Santa María de Arequipa (Perú) con el título “El pensamiento computacional: La nueva alfabetización de las culturas digitales”.

En la primera entrada se plantea lo que debe ser el pensamiento computacional dentro del curriculum escolar de Primaria, de Secundaria Obligatoria y de Bachillerato o Secundaria Postobligatoria y también de Educación Infantil: Una tercera competencia clave, junto con las dos que de forma comúnmente aceptada así se consideran: Lenguaje y matemáticas.

 

¿Qué es el Pensamiento Computacional?

1. Alfabetizaciones y culturas digitales

El pensamiento computacional se ha definido como una nueva alfabetización digital. Será importante que primero nos acerquemos a este concepto.

La idea más extendida sobre lo que es la alfabetización digital (Digital Literacy) es que consiste en una trasposición.

A lo largo de la historia se han sucedido distintas alfabetizaciones y todas han tenido una significación común: han supuesto una adaptación a los nuevos medios de comunicación, representación y proceso de la información entre humanos. Así, según esta idea, la Alfabetización Digital es la adaptación y la capacitación para esas funciones de comunicación, representación y proceso a las coordenadas de la revolución tecnológica y de la sociedad de la información, consideradas en sentido estrictamente tecnológico, como revolución de medios de comunicación y de difusión de ideas.

Ésta es la idea del autor que pasó como el creador del concepto: Paul Gilster (1997). Este autor no nos proporcionó una listas de habilidades, competencias o actitudes en la  definición de lo que es una cultura digital (a diferencia de como nosotros tratamos de hacer). Dio una explicación muy general, la definió como la capacidad de entender y utilizar la información de una gran variedad de fuentes digitales. Por tanto, se trata de la actualización per se de lo que se entiende de forma  tradicional por alfabetización. Sólo que en este caso se trata de  la capacidad de leer, escribir y realizar cualquier transacción con la información, pero ahora utilizando las tecnologías y los formatos de datos actuales, al igual que la alfabetización clásica utilizaba la tecnología de la información y los formatos de cada época (libros, papiros, pergaminos, tablillas,…). Pero sobre todo, en ambos casos, se considera como un conjunto de habilidades esenciales para la vida. La crítica es que ésta es una expresión genérica del concepto, sin ir ilustrada o acompañada de una “listas de competencias”. Limitación que intentamos superar en nuestro trabajo (Zapata-Ros, 2015)

Otros autores utilizaron y explicaron el concepto durante los años noventa:

Bawden (2001) la define como la capacidad de leer y comprender  elementos de información en los formatos de hipertexto o multimedia

Lanham (1995) la considera como una especie de “alfabetización multimedia”. Se basaba, de forma débil, en que desde una fuente digital se podrían generar muchas formas de texto, de informaciones, imágenes, sonidos, etc.  Esto justificaba la necesidad de una nueva forma de alfabetización, con el fin de interpretar, de  dar sentido a estas nuevas formas de presentación, pues es claro que una alfabetización entraña muchas más operaciones y ámbitos de desarrollo que las técnicas interpretativas. Obviamente se trataba además de un planteamiento restrictivo al centrarse en el multimedia, frente al concepto más amplio de la alfabetización digital. Era una interpretación demasiado focalizada en una tecnología concreta de una época concreta.

Distintas concepciones de este tipo son revisadas ​​por Eshet (2002). Que, tras el análisis de estas concepciones, llega a la conclusión de que la alfabetización digital debe considerarse  más como  la capacidad de utilizar las fuentes digitales de forma eficaz que de otra cosa. Se trata pues  de un tipo especial de mentalidad o pensamiento. Esta conceptualización está bastante más próxima a lo que planteamos en este trabajo, únicamente que se refiere a la forma de procesar la información, no a organizar la resolución de problemas. El pensamiento computacional es más una resolución de problemas.

Pero un gran mérito de la definición de Gilster, en su libro de 1997, es que rechaza de plano la idea que dio lugar al mito de los “nativos digitales”.  Afirma explícitamente que “la alfabetización digital tiene que ver con  el dominio de las ideas, no con las pulsaciones en el teclado”. Dice claramente, en su concepción, lo limitado de las “habilidades técnicas” desde la perspectiva de la alfabetización digital. Señala que “no sólo hay que adquirir la habilidad de hallar las cosas, sobre todo se debe adquirir la capacidad de utilizar esas cosas en la vida del individuo”(pp. 1-2).

Un fuerte impulso de esta idea sobre lo establecido por Gilster (1997) lo da David Bawden (2008, Capítulo 1), donde afirma  que la alfabetización digital implica una forma de distinguir una variedad creciente de conceptos y de hechos, para delimitar los que son relevantes en orden a conseguir  el dominio de las ideas. E insiste en lo necesario para ello de una evaluación cuidadosa de la información, en el análisis inteligente y en la síntesis. Todo ello como vemos tiene que ver con la metacognición. Para ello  proporciona listas de habilidades específicas y de técnicas que se consideran necesarias para estos objetivos, y  que en conjunto constituyen  lo que califica como una cultura digital. Es importante señalar que los auténticos avances sobre estas ideas siempre son las mismas, provienen de listas de competencias, donde resaltan los aspectos metacognitivos

Sobre estas competencias Bawden (2008) remite a las expuestas en otro trabajo anterior (Bawden, 2001). En las habilidades que señalan se constatan ideas como la de construir un “bagaje de información fiable” de diversas fuentes, las habilidades de recuperación, utilizando una forma de “pensamiento crítico” para hacer juicios informados sobre la información recuperada, y para asegurar la validez e integridad de las fuentes de Internet, leer y comprender de forma dinámica y cambiante material no secuencial. Y así una serie de habilidades donde como novedad se introducen las affordances de conocimiento en entornos sociales y de comunicación en redes, y la idea de relevancia. Sobre las ideas de Bawden se debería volver.

Llegados a este punto hay una segunda línea de delimitación conceptual, estudiada por Eshet-Alkalai (2004). A partir de su reflexión  advierte sobre la incompatibilidad entre los planteamientos de aquellos que conciben la alfabetización digital como “principalmente constituida por habilidades técnicas, y los que la ven centrada en aspectos cognitivos y socio-emocionales del trabajo en entornos digitales”.

Otro criterio que se ha tenido en cuenta en la aproximación al concepto de Alfabetización Digital fue el de clasificar (Lankshear y Knobel, 2006) según se tratase de un enfoque conceptual o de un enfoque “operacional”.

Es importante esta última tendencia, la de definiciones basadas en operaciones,  porque implica una estandarización. Y esto confiere un carácter “funcional” a  la Alfabetización Digital. Estamos pues en presencia de un enfoque de índole cultura digital, centrando en el estudio en la naturaleza de las  tareas, presentaciones, demostraciones de habilidades, etc. que se realizan, que progresan en la construcción de estándares  para definir qué es o no es Alfabetización Digital.

Por último hay una variante comercial de la Alfabetización Digital, que consiste en una certificación de competencias. Es la acreditación conocida como Internet and Computing Core Certificación (IC³) (www.certiport.com). Su página web  afirma que la “certificación IC³ ayuda a aprender y a demostrar Internet y la alfabetización digital a través de un estándar de evaluación del aprendizaje válido para la industria en todo el mundo”. Se basa en un sistema de formación y de certificación a través de un examen que abarca contenidos sobre Fundamentos de  Informática, en aplicaciones básicas y claves para la vida,  en lo que llaman la “vida conectada”.

Lo que se propone en este trabajo, con la construcción de la idea del pensamiento computacional a partir de elementos o de formas específicas de pensamiento para resolver problemas, tiene que ver con la Alfabetización Digital en lo concerniente a que éste está constituido por competencias clave que sirven para aprender y comprender ideas, procesos y fenómenos no sólo en el ámbito de la programación de ordenadores o incluso del mundo de la computación, de Internet o de la nueva sociedad del conocimiento, sino que es sobre todo útil para emprender operaciones cognitivas y  para la elaboración compleja que, de otra forma, sería más complejo, o imposible, realizar. O bien, dicho de otra forma, sin estos elementos de conocimiento sería más difícil resolver ciertos problemas de cualquier ámbito, no solo de la vida científica o tecnológica, sino de la vida común.

Como dijimos, y concluyendo, se considera como un conjunto de habilidades esenciales para la vida en la mayoría de los casos y como un talante especial para afrontar problemas científicos y tecnológicos.

Señalamos en relación con esta última acepción algunos ejemplos que veremos después, o hemos visto, en este trabajo, como son el de la  determinación de la génesis de los contagios, en el caso que cuestiona teorías generales como la teoría miasmática del origen de las enfermedades, o la secuencia de llenado de los asientos en el embarque de aeronaves.

 

Referencias

Bawden, D. (2001). Information and digital literacies: a review of concepts. Journal of Documentation, 57(2), 218–259.

Bawden, D. (2008). Origins and concepts of digital literacy. Digital literacies: Concepts, policies and practices, 17-32. http://sites.google.com/site/colinlankshear/DigitalLiteracies.pdf#page=19

Eshet, Y. (2002). Digital literacy: A new terminology framework and its application to the design of meaningful technology-based learning environments, In P. Barker and S. Rebelsky (Eds.), Proceedings of the World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecomunications, 493–498 Chesapeake VA: AACE, Retrieved November 30, 2007, from http://infosoc.haifa.ac.il/DigitalLiteracyEshet.doc

Eshet-Alkalai, Y. (2004), Digital literacy: a conceptual framework for survival skills in the digital era, Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 139(1), 93–106. Available at: http://www.openu.ac.il/Personal_sites/download/Digital-literacy2004-JEMH.pdf

Gilster, P. (1997). Digital literacy. New York: Wiley.

Lanham, R.A. (1995). Digital literacy, Scientifi c American, 273(3), 160–161.

Lankshear, C. and Knobel, M. (2006). Digital literacies: policy, pedagogy and research considerations for education. Digital Kompetanse: Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, 1(1), 12–24.

Zapata-Ros, M. (2012). La Sociedad Postindustrial del Conocimiento. Un enfoque multidisciplinar desde la perspectiva de los nuevos métodos para organizar el aprendizaje. Amazon. Consultado en http://www.amazon.es/Sociedad-Postindustrial-del-Conocimiento-multidisciplinar/dp/1492180580.

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia. Número 46.  15 de Septiembre de 2015. Consultado el (dd/mm/aa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/46

Pensamiento computacional. Una tercera competencia clave. (I)

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Alcalá

Con ésta entrada se inicia una serie que, en conjunto, constituirán un capítulo de un libro que está acordado sea publicado por la editorial de la Universidad Católica de Santa María de Arequipa (Perú) con el título provisional de “El pensamiento computacional: La nueva alfabetización de las culturas digitales”.

El título del capítulo ya, de entrada, presupone una propuesta de atribución de valor y sentido de lo que debe ser el pensamiento computacional dentro del curriculum escolar de Primaria, de Secundaria Obligatoria y de Bachillerato o Secundaria Postobligatoria y también de Educación Infantil: Una tercera competencia clave, junto con las dos que de forma comúnmente aceptada así se consideran: Lenguaje y matemáticas. 

¿Por qué un corpus curricular sobre “pensamiento computacional” ahora?

Hace dos años decíamos (Zapata-Ros, 2015) que “las instituciones y agencias competentes, los expertos y los autores de informes de tendencia se han visto sorprendidos por un hecho: la sociedad y los sistemas de producción, de servicios y de consumo demandan profesionales cualificados en las industrias de la información”. Constatando, en el mundo desarrollado, la existencia de altas tasas de paro con un considerable número de puestos de trabajo de ingenieros de software, desarrolladores de aplicaciones, documentalistas digitales, que se quedan sin cubrir por falta de egresados de las escuelas técnicas, por falta de demanda de estos estudios por parte de potenciales alumnos y sobre todo por la falta de personal capacitado.

Esta era una causa pero hay otras que señalamos en (Zapata-Ros, 2012) como son las disrupciones universitarias que hacen que un número considerable de individuos, algunos extremadamente competentes, soslayen la vía de formación, y promoción profesional formales que teóricamente la universidad tienen encomendadas por otras vías más autónomas.

Ahora la toma de conciencia de las instituciones y agencias públicas, estatales e interestatales es mucho mayor. Una muestra de ello es la declaración de la UE en el documento The Computational Thinking Study[1]

Computational thinking (CT) is a shorthand for “thinking as a computer scientist”, i.e. the ability to use the concepts of computer science to formulate and solve problems. Computational thinking has been promoted in recent years as a skill or competence that is as fundamental as numeracy and literacy. Despite the high interest in developing CT among schoolchildren and the large public and private investment in CT initiatives, there are a number of issues and challenges for the integration of CT in the school curricula.

Tras una primera etapa de toma de conciencia ante la situación, algunos países han reaccionado de forma diversa según podemos ver en la tabla que constituye la última parte del presente trabajo.

En ese cuadro podemos ver distintas respuestas por parte de los sistemas educativos de los países más sensibles, los que han abordado el problema desde la perspectiva de una reorganización del curriculum. Sin embargo la cuestión de fondo supone la aparición de unas nuevas destrezas básicas. Las sociedades más conscientes han visto que se trata de una nueva alfabetización, una nueva alfabetización digital, y que por tanto hay que comenzar desde las primeras etapas del desarrollo individual, al igual como sucede con otras habilidades clave: la lectura, la escritura y las habilidades matemáticas, e incluso estudiando las concomitancias y coincidencias de esta nueva alfabetización con estas competencias claves tradicionales.

Afortunadamente la propuesta de poner a los niños a programar desde las primeras etapas, como única o principal estrategia de enseñanza, está cediendo. Según esta opción, la que ha sido la más frecuente hasta ahora y la más simple, a fuer de ser una respuesta  mecánica, ha consistido en favorecer el aprendizaje de la programación y de sus lenguajes de forma progresiva. En la práctica este procedimiento ha consistido, y aún constituye de forma muy frecuente, en proponer a los niños tareas de programar desde las primeras etapas. De manera que la progresión estuviese en la dificultad de las tareas y en su carácter motivador, desde las más sencillas y más lúdicas a las más complejas y aburridas. Se vincula aprendizaje con la respuesta a un estímulo, no con las características de aprendizaje y cognitivas del niño, en la tradición más clásica del conductismo.

Sin embargo una propuesta que hacíamos hace dos años (Zapata-Ros, 2015) se está abriendo cada vez más paso y lo hace de manera más decisiva. Se trata de la alternativa, ya tenida en cuenta por Papert (1980),  la que enlaza con corrientes clásicas del aprendizaje apoyado en la tecnología. Nos referimos al construccionismo. Esta alternativa está sostenida por algunos autores, inspira a profesores y grupos innovadores en la puesta en marcha de actividades y en algunos pocos casos a corporaciones que,  frecuentemente de forma aislada, nos planteamos la cuestión de otro modo: Las competencias que se muestran como más eficaces en la codificación son la parte más visible de una forma de pensar, que es útil no sólo en ese ámbito de actividades cognitivas, las que se utilizan en el desarrollo y en la creación de programas y de sistemas informáticos, sino en otras actividades de la vida profesional o científica y de la vida personal. En definitiva sostienen que hay una forma específica de pensar, de organizar ideas y representaciones, que propicia y que favorece las competencias computacionales, pero no sólo. Se trata de una forma de pensar que propicia el análisis y la relación de ideas  para la organización y la representación lógica de procedimientos. Esas habilidades se ven favorecidas con ciertas actividades y con ciertos entornos de aprendizaje desde las primeras etapas. Se trata del desarrollo de un pensamiento específico, de un pensamiento computacional.

Hemos dicho que un precedente remoto de estas ideas está en el construccionismo, en las ideas de autores como Seymourt Paper, en las ideas que puso en marcha ahora hace cincuenta años y que le llevaron a construir el lenguaje LOGO, sus entornos de aprendizaje y micromundos.

Paulo Blikstein (2013) de la Universidad de Stanford, dice que si un historiador tuviera que trazar una línea que uniese la obra de Jean Piaget sobre la psicología del desarrollo a las tendencias actuales en la tecnología educativa, la línea simplemente se llamaría “Papert”.  Seymour Papert ha estado en el centro de tres revoluciones: el desarrollo del pensamiento en la infancia, la inteligencia artificial y las tecnologías informáticas para la educación. Quizá el que no haya tenido el impacto debido se deba a que se anticipó.

La visión de Papert se podría sintetizar diciendo que “los niños deben programar la computadora en lugar de ser programados por ella” (children should be programming the computer rather than being programmed by it) (Papert, 1980  a través de Blikstein, 2013)

Ahora, en la fase actual del desarrollo de la tecnología y de las teorías del aprendizaje se podría decir “son los niños los que tienen que educar a los ordenadores no los ordenadores los que tienen que educar a los niños”

Este trabajo, el anterior (Zapata-Ros, 2015), y en general las actividades y reflexiones que se proponen, están justificados por el papel que, en el contexto de cambios sociales, laborales, y culturales (Zapata-Ros, 2014), tiene el desarrollo individual que, desde las primeras etapas, faciliten una integración en ese nuevo entorno, mediante un  aprendizaje orientado hacia las competencias que son necesarias en la programación.

Se trata pues, como vamos a ver, de una nueva alfabetización. De una alfabetización que permita a las personas en su vida real afrontar retos propios de la nueva sociedad. Pero no solo eso, que permita a los individuos organizar su entorno, sus estrategias de desenvolvimiento, de resolución de problemas cotidianos, además de  organizar su mundo de relaciones, en un contexto de comunicación más racional y eficiente.

Todo ello con el resultado de que los individuos puedan organizar estrategias más eficientes para conseguir objetivos personales de índole muy diversa. En definitiva se trata de conseguir una mayor calidad de vida y un mayor nivel de felicidad.

Coincidiendo con la perspectiva que señaló Paper (1980) y antes los psicólogos genéticos y constructivistas (Piaget, 1977) sobre el desarrollo cognitivo, en este planteamiento subyace, como idea-fuerza,  que, al igual a como sucede con la música, con la danza o con la práctica de deportes, es clave  que se fomente una práctica formativa del pensamiento computacional desde las primeras etapas de desarrollo. De manera que, al igual que se pone en contacto a los niños con un entorno musical, de danza o de  deporte, se haga con un entorno de juegos, affordances y en general de actividades que promuevan, a través de la observación y de la manipulación, destrezas y formas de pensar que sean un campo abonado donde se inserten, y se produzcan de manera fluída, las formas de trabajar y de resolver problemas propias de los programadores eficientes.

Sin embargo hay que decir, y así lo constatamos en las indagaciones que hemos hecho para escribir este capítulo, que no tenemos en muchos casos ni evidencias de que esos entornos y esas manipulaciones desarrollen las destrezas computacionales o habilidades asociadas a lo que hemos llamado pensamiento computacional.  Habría pues, como primera cuestión, señalar la necesidad de fomentar investigaciones para tenerlas.

De alguna forma, no es nueva esta perspectiva, pero sí descontextualizada de esa situación. Tradicionalmente, en el diseño curricular de las primeras etapas de desarrollo se ha hablado de aprendizajes  o de destrezas concretas que en un futuro predispondría a los aprendices para aprender mejor en un futuro habilidades matemáticas, geométricas, de lenguaje, como son la seriación, el encaje, la discriminación de objetos por propiedades, en las primeras etapas, y también en las de desarrollo del pensamiento abstracto o para la resolución de problemas. Así se ha hablado de la modularización, del análisis descendente, de análisis ascendente, de recursividad, e incluso de sinéctica y de cinestesia… En la perspectiva Montessori (1928, 1935 y 1937) por ejemplo esto es básico. Para ello se han desarrollado ya multitud de recursos, juegos y actividades que los educadores infantiles conocen bien.

En el trabajo que sirve de precedente a este (Zapata-Ros, 2015) recurrimos a un caso de un niño que secuencia objetos con unos pocos meses de edad, con la circunstancia coincidente de que ha utilizado juguetes de este tipo. Ese mismo niño también ha utilizado, en los meses siguientes, juegos de composición (tangram y puzles) y de percepción y manipulación del espacio 3D, con un notable rendimiento en pensamiento abstracto en esta área para los observadores. También de forma coincidente con esta práctica regular y rutinaria, pero no por ello menos lúdica, en un ejercicio de dibujo de los que hace en clase sin que tuviese el resultado que veremos como objetivo, y sin orientaciones previas en ese sentido, el niño fue capaz de dibujar (fig.1) la planta de su clase, como podemos ver en la reproducción que adjuntamos, donde se distinguen elementos claramente simbolizados en formas, como son la pizarra la mesa y sillas o la escalera. Así como una persona que el niño identifica como “la seño”, la maestra.

Fig. 1

De esta forma deducimos que el niño se ha desprendido de su contingencia corporal-espacial y ha visto, ha percibido, la distribución del espacio y objetos, claramente simbolizados como si él estuviese desde arriba.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obviamente es un hecho aislado sólo. Pero podemos intuir que hay multitud de áreas y de formas de aprendizaje que conviene explorar e investigar en esta nueva frontera. Y, en la planificación de los curricula, tendrán que plantearse los diseñadores esta dicotomía: Enseñar a programar con dificultad  progresiva (si se quiere incluso de forma lúdica o con juegos) o favorecer este nuevo tipo de pensamiento. Obviamente no hace falta decir que nuestra propuesta es la segunda, que además incluye a la primera.

Pero volvamos al tema central, la naturaleza, la delimitación y la definición del pensamiento computacional.

Tropezamos con varios problemas de comienzo: acotar el contenido y encontrar los términos y conceptos adecuados para definirlo.

En un principio se utilizó la expresión codificación y precodificación. La segunda extraída de la literatura anglosajona, coding  o code. En este sentido se utilizó en los textos que publicitaron el año 2014 como el año del código, o de la codificación, o de la programación (Year of code). Es importante acceder al documento de difusión donde además de utilizar el término code dan una aproximación bastante general pero precisa del término ya desde el principio. Así se dice (Silva, 2014):

A través de la codificación (code) la gente puede descubrir el poder de la informática, cambiando su forma de pensar acerca de su entorno y obtener el máximo provecho del mundo que le rodea.

Más precisa es la definición del informe de 2014 de la Unión Europea (Balanskat & Engelhardt , October, 2015) Computing our future Computer programmingand coding – Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe:

La codificación (coding) es cada vez más una competencia clave que tendrá que ser adquirida por todos los jóvenes estudiantes y cada vez más por los trabajadores en una amplia gama de actividades industriales y profesiones. La codificación es parte del razonamiento lógico y representa una de las habilidades clave que forma parte de lo que ahora se llaman “habilidades del siglo 21″.

Como vemos es un dominio conceptual muy próximo a lo que hemos visto y veremos que es el pensamiento computacional, al menos se expresa con ese sentido que le hemos atribuido.

Por otro lado, de igual forma que se habla de prelectura, pre-escritura o precálculo para nombrar competencias que allanan el camino a las destrezas clave y a las competencias instrumentales que anuncian, cabe hablar de precodificación preprogramación para designar las competencias que son previas y necesarias en las fases anteriores del desarrollo para la codificación.

Un planteamiento útil en este sentido es que los niños se familiaricen en las primeras etapas de desarrollo a preconceptos de variable, función, valor, parámetros, que sin necesidad de referencias explícitas, desarrollen habilidades y preconceptos  que en el futuro puedan alojar operaciones o conceptos más complejos, propios de habilidades cognitivas superiores más propios de la programación. Así los equivalentes a variables pueden ser rasgos de objetos como el color, la forma, el tamaño,… Y los procedimientos u operaciones con estos rasgos (variables) pueden ser la seriación, el encaje, etc. Evidentemente hay muchas más habilidades y más complejas en su análisis y en el diseño de actividades y entornos para que este aprendizaje se produzca. Así, este ámbito de la instrucción es lo que podría denominarse precodificación o preprogramación. Sin embargo creemos que es más propio llamarle precodificación, pues codificación describe, con más precisión y más ajuste conceptual, la transferencia de acciones e informaciones para que puedan ser interpretados por los ordenadores y otros dispositivos de proceso, circulación y almacenamiento de la  información.

Si solamente hablásemos de algo preparatorio para la programación, podríamos hacerlo así, y sin duda sería correcto. Sin embargo esto se correspondía, en otros dominios y con anterioridad, con un propósito más amplio que es prepararse para dotarse de claves de comprensión y de representación de los objetos de conocimiento en general. Es por ello que vemos más adecuada la expresión “pensamiento computacional” (computational thinking), que a continuación desarrollaremos

Otra expresión que se propone habitualmente es la de alfabetización digital, o “una nueva alfabetización digital”. Sin embargo hay que  reconocer que, al menos en español, e impropiamente, esta expresión tiene resonancias próximas al término “alfabetización informática”, al menos en su uso. Que inevitablemente, por el uso, nos recuerda la informática de usuario, al considerare esta alfabetización como el conocimiento y la destreza para manejarse en entornos de usuario. Así es frecuente entre la gente poco ilustrada confundir al buen informático con el que maneja bien, es hábil, con los programas de usuario, las APPs, o al que se maneja con fluidez y rapidez en los ambientes de menús, ventanas y opciones, o simplemente al que tiene habilidad en los pulgares para manejar un smartphone, o con el índice para moverse por un tablet. En una acepción lamentablemente muy extendida y banal ha dado lugar a que prendan conceptos paracientíficos como son los de nativo y emigrante digital.

Como veremos después estas adherencias las eliminaremos al hablar de alfabetizaciones en relación con culturas epistemológicas, así la alfabetización digital tendrá que ver, estará relacionada forzosamente, con la cultura o las culturas digitales.

En lo que sigue aceptamos la definición de alfabetización digital (computer literacy) como el conocimiento y la capacidad de utilizar las computadoras y la tecnología relacionada con ellas de manera eficiente, con una serie de habilidades que cubren los niveles de uso elemental de la programación y la resolución de problemas avanzada (Washington, US Congress of Technology Assessment, OTA CIT-235 April 1984, page 234). Con el reparo, ya citado,  de que en ese mismo documento se acepta que la expresión alfabetización digital también se puede utilizar para describir el nivel de acomodo que un individuo tiene con el uso de programas de ordenador y otras aplicaciones que están asociados con las computadoras . La alfabetización digital por último se puede referir a la comprensión de cómo funcionan los ordenadores y a la facilidad de operar con ellos.

En lo que sigue hablaremos más de “pensamiento computacional” (computational thinking) y de  las iniciativas necesarias para que esta nueva alfabetización digital se produzca: El estudio y la investigación de un nuevo curriculum escolar y el análisis de propuestas para la formación para maestros y profesores.

El primer dilema del pensamiento computacional

Como hemos señalado, una vez aceptada la necesidad de que los niños, desde sus primeras etapas de desarrollo, adquieran las habilidades del pensamiento computacional, constatamos que se han producido, se nos proponen, dos alternativas que constituyen los términos de un dilema:

Por un lado la respuesta más frecuente y  más simple,  a fuer de ser una respuesta  mecánica, ha consistido en favorecer el aprendizaje de las técnicas ya consagradas de programación y de sus lenguajes de forma progresiva, o de lenguajes cada vez más complejos: primero juegos con estructuras constructivas de lenguajes —bucles, iteraciones, bifurcaciones lógicas,…—- luego lenguajes sencillos utilizados para resolver problemas divertidos, de juegos, etc. para posteriormente ir aumentando la dificultad, sin señalar que en cada uno de estos pasos hemos ido dejando gente por el camino y al final nos quedamos con la élite friki de los programadores de siempre. En esencia se trataba de proponer a los niños tareas de programar desde las primeras etapas. De manera que la progresión estuviese en la dificultad de las tareas y en su carácter motivador, desde las más sencillas y más lúdicas a las más complejas y aburridas. Se vincula lo que se aprende con la respuesta a un estímulo, no con las características propias de aprendizaje y cognición del niño. En definitiva, nada nuevo, se sigue con ello la tradición más clásica del conductismo.

Este es el tipo de planteamiento que está detrás de la idea, simple pero de supuesta eficiencia productiva, de obtener individuos que hagan muchas líneas de programa y capaces de  hacerlas muy rápidamente, sin pensar previamente mucho en el problema a resolver, sin diagramas, sin diseño,… En definitiva es la idea que hay detrás de los concursos de programación, de enseñar a programar a través de juegos, etc.

Como hemos dicho es un planteamiento competitivo que deja a fuera a muchos niños y como corolario,  que hace poco deseable para muchos ser programador, o al menos les confiere una imagen de frikis, poco deseable, a los programadores (individuo gordo descuidado, atado al ordenador, poco amigo del ejercicio físico y del aseo personal). En definitiva unos tipos raros con un perfil poco atractivo. Éste  puede llegar a ser un planteamiento, por muchas razones, no solo poco deseable sino excluyente.

Luego está el otro término del dilema. Lo importante según esta visión no es que los alumnos escriban programas, sino desarrollar en ellos actitudes y capacidades para  enfrentar los problemas en las situaciones previas no solo al código, sino incluso al algoritmo. De manera que la organización de la solución, a partir de la visión del problema y de las herramientas cognitivas y metacognitivas, de que dispone para resolverlo, le fluya. Para ello lo importante es que los maestros sepan cómo los alumnos se representan la realidad, su mundo de objetivos y expectativas, pero también cómo funcionan los mecanismos de aprendizaje en estos casos, y cuáles son las formas de trabajar exitosas de los que tienen éxito en hacer programas potentes.

Así pues lo importante no es el software que escriben, sino lo que piensan cuando lo escriben. Y sobre todo la forma en que lo piensan.

Conocer este mundo de ideas, de procedimientos y de representaciones, cómo operan, constituye el principio básico del “pensamiento computacional”. Y cualquier otro conocimiento, como memorizar a la perfección las reglas que constituyen la sintaxis y las primitivas (la gramática) de cualquier lenguaje de programación, no les sirve de nada a los alumnos si no pueden pensar en buenas maneras de aplicarlas.

Éste es pues el segundo término del dilema en el que hay que decidir.

Desgraciadamente, como veremos en la segunda parte de este capítulo, la modalidad por la que se ha optado de forma más frecuente ha sido la de enseñar a programar directamente. Esa ha sido también la que se ha empezado a utilizar en nuestro país. Así,  por ejemplo, se ha hecho en la Comunidad de Madrid[2] (Valverde et al, 2015). Simplemente se describen los contenidos y destrezas de programación a conseguir. La novedad consiste en introducir un bloque de contenidos, de forma convencional (no diferente de cómo se hace con el resto) dentro de las asignaturas de libre configuración autonómica. Así en el punto c (1º y 2º) del artículo 8, que remiten al anexo III de la orden, dice:

“1º (…) se establecen los contenidos, los criterios de evaluación y los estándares de aprendizaje evaluables de las materias Tecnología, Programación y Robótica, Ampliación de Matemáticas: Resolución de Problemas y Taller de Música.

2º. El Departamento de Coordinación Didáctica de Tecnología se responsabilizará de la impartición de la materia Tecnología, Programación y Robótica con carácter prioritario. Secundariamente, podrán impartirla profesores de la especialidad de Informática, siempre que previamente estén cubiertos en su totalidad los horarios de la Familia Profesional de Informática y Comunicaciones.”

El patrón es el mismo que cualquier otra disciplina, pero en este caso se hace además de forma subsidiaria.

Lo que subyace en la redacción, en éste como en otros casos es un abordamiento convencional: Conducir a los alumnos de Secundaria por el camino más áspero, el de los contenidos y estándares de aprendizaje, pero en este caso, los de la programación per se. En este contexto no se proporcionan, ni se mencionan, otro tipo de ayudas o de claves para conseguir los efectos de que hablamos en el apartado anterior. Está muy lejos, cuando no en otra esfera, de lo que se plantea como Pensamiento Computacional.

Algunos de los resultados de esta forma de operar puede ser la exclusión de los que no tienen el don, o la habilidad innata, para programar directamente. De aquellos alumnos que, ante sólo la presencia del problema a resolver, se les activan mecanismos para con los elementos de programación (de los que proporciona un lenguaje específico: Sintaxis, órdenes, procedimientos, filosofía propia del lenguaje) elaborar el código.  Esta dinámica conduce a la creación de estereotipos y perfiles de alumnos con facilidad para la programación, y del tópico de que la programación es solo cosa de los programadores.

Hay otro efecto derivado. Si se aprende a programar como algo asociado a un lenguaje, es posible que no se produzca la transferencia,  y que en futuras ocasiones o en distintos contextos no se pueda repetir el proceso. Esto hace que la competencia profesional sea menos, y que la inserción no se produzca con toda eficacia que podría ser si se hiciera vinculado a operaciones cognitivas superiores. Las asociaciones profesionales se quejan de que las empresas contraten a informáticos de forma efímera. Sin reparar que es posible que suceda porque han aprendido de forma efímera, como algo vinculado a lenguajes y a programas pasajeros. De manera que en un futuro próximo, cuando cambie el programa o la versión actual, no tendrán flexibilidad mental para adaptarse a nuevos entornos, no solo de programación, sino de problemas. Esto no sucede, y las empresas lo saben, si contratan a titulados más familiarizados con elementos de pensamiento heurísticos, o de otro tipo de entre los glosados en el repertorio del trabajo de referencia (Zapata-Ros, 2015). Nos referimos a la facilidad con que estas empresas recurren a matemáticos o a físicos, que sí tienen esa competencia de abstraer los procedimientos para distinguir aspectos invariantes de la resolución de problemas en entornos cambiantes.

Esto no ocurre así cuando se empieza por desarrollar habilidades generales previas que se puedan activar en situaciones de elaboración de códigos o de resolución de otros problemas. Podemos afirmar que sí existen referencias (Raja, 2014) de investigaciones que ponen de manifiesto que cuando se empieza por enseñar el pensamiento computacional en vez de por la elaboración de códigos, desvinculando la iniciación en el aprendizaje a ser diestros con el ordenador, tal como se entiende habitualmente, se evita el principio de discriminación que hace que algún tipo de niños y de niñas se inhiban.

Una última derivación del tema es que esta forma de organizar el aprendizaje supone  un principio de democratización en el acceso a este conocimiento, que de esta forma no queda restringido a las élites de programadores. De manera que incluso, los que en un futuro pueden ser bibliotecarios, médicos o artistas, pueden ser también buenos programadores. Y por ende se podría ampliar la base de conocimiento que se vuelca al mundo de la computación, lo que constituye el motor y el combustible de la Sociedad del Conocimiento.

Referencias.-

Balanskat, A.  & Engelhardt , K. (October, 2014). Computing our future Computer programming and coding – Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe.  European Schoolnet (EUN Partnership AISBL) http://www.eun.org/c/document_library/get_file?uuid=521cb928-6ec4-4a86-b522-9d8fd5cf60ce&groupId=43887

Balanskat, A.  & Engelhardt , K. (October, 2015). Computing our future Computer programming and coding – Priorities, school curricula and initiatives across Europe.  European Schoolnet (EUN Partnership AISBL)

Blikstein,  (2013). Seymour Papert’s Legacy: Thinking About Learning, and Learning About Thinking. https://tltl.stanford.edu/content/seymour-papert-s-legacy-thinking-about-learning-and-learning-about-thinking

MONTESSORI, M. (1928). Antropología Pedagógica. Barcelona: Araluce

MONTESSORI, M. (1937). Método de la Pedagogía Científica. Barcelona: Araluce

MONTESSORI, M. (1935). Manual práctico del método. Barcelona: Araluce

Papert, S. (1980). Mindstorms: Children, computers, and powerful ideas. Basic Books, Inc. http://www.arvindguptatoys.com/arvindgupta/mindstorms.pdf

Piaget, J. (1947). La psychologie de l’intelligence [The psychology of intelligence]. http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203278895

Piaget, J. (1972). Psicología de la inteligencia. Editorial Psique. Buenos Aires.

Piaget, J. (1977). The role of action in the development of thinking. In Knowledge and development (pp. 17-42). Springer US.

Raja, T. (2014). We can code it!. http://www.motherjones.com/media/2014/06/computer-science-programming-code-diversity-sexism-education.

Silva, R. (2014). START CODING THIS YEAR IT’S EASIER THAN YOU THINK. http://yearofcode.org/

Zapata-Ros, M. (2012). La Sociedad Postindustrial del Conocimiento. Un enfoque multidisciplinar desde la perspectiva de los nuevos métodos para organizar el aprendizaje. Amazon. Consultado en http://www.amazon.es/Sociedad-Postindustrial-del-Conocimiento-multidisciplinar/dp/1492180580.

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia. Número 46.  15 de Septiembre de 2015. Consultado el (dd/mm/aa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/46

 

[1] The Computational Thinking Study. Joint Research Centre (JRC). EU Science Hub

https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/computational-thinking

[2] DECRETO 48/2015, de 14 de mayo, del Consejo de Gobierno, por el que se establece para la Comunidad de Madrid el currículo de la Educación Secundaria Obligatoria. Recuperado a partir de http://www.bocm.es/boletin/CM_Orden_BOCM/2015/05/20/BOCM-20150520-1.PDF

 

 

Patrones de Pensamiento Computacional y corpus lingüísticos: el aprendizaje de lenguas con datos lingüísticos (y II)

 

Pascual Pérez-Paredes,  University of Cambridge

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Alcalá

3. Elaboración de un patrón pedagógico para el uso de DDL (aplicación de la categoría de aprendizaje activo)

 

3.1. Componentes de los lenguajes de patrón

 

La expresión “lenguajes de patrón”, al igual que el término “patrón” son constructos acuñados por el arquitecto Christopher Alexander. Los defensores de este enfoque para los métodos de diseño suponen que esta forma de proceder ayuda a los no expertos (a los aprendices de lenguas en nuestro caso y en última instancia) a resolver con éxito problemas de diseño complejo en bastantes ocasiones. Al igual los lenguajes humanos, un lenguaje de patrones tiene un vocabulario, una sintaxis y una gramática. En los lenguajes de patrones utilizados para el diseño, las partes se descomponen de esta manera:

 

  1. El vocabulario. Es el contenido del lenguaje. Lo constituyen una colección de términos, que de forma especializada van a ayudar a describir soluciones a los problemas “en un campo de interés”.  Así, por ejemplo, en el lenguaje Arquitectura el lenguaje lo constituyen términos como: cimientos, edificios, salas, ventanas, cerraduras, etc. En nuestro caso el vocabulario necesario para la descripción del patrón pedgógico estará constituido por los seis conceptos abordados en el apartado 2.2, a saber, corpus, interfaz de búsqueda o concordanciero, nodo, líneas de concordancia, colocaciones y n-grams.
  2. “Sintaxis”. Cada solución a un problema incluye una descripción insertándola en una solución, o en un contexto, más amplio, de manera que cada solución se ajusta a un diseño más grande, más amplio o más abstractos y cada solución se vincula a otras soluciones en una red de soluciones necesarias. Por ejemplo, las habitaciones disponen de formas de obtener la luz, y las formas de acceder y de salir. La sintaxis tiene que ver con las reglas que rigen el lenguaje en tanto que estas reglas van referidas a los términos en sus relaciones con otros términos o con otros contextos más amplios que los contienen. En el caso del uso de DDL para el aprendizaje de lenguas adoptaremos el proceso lineal expuesto en la Figura 3, el cual se divide, a grandes rasgos, en cuatro etapas: inicio de la búsqueda (1), fase de interpretación de datos (2), fase de consolidación de la hipótesis (3) y fase de formulación final de los hallazgos realizados (4). En cada una de estas etapas los aprendices utilizarán alguno de los cinco bloques   (A,B,C,D,E) en los que hemos dividido
  3. “Gramática”. Cada patrón, cada solución, incluye la descripción del problema que resuelve y cómo lo hace, y el beneficio que se obtiene. Por lo tanto, si el beneficio no es necesario o no compensa, la solución no se utiliza. Incluso puede darse que una parte del diseño se puede omitir para ahorrar recursos. En el ejemplo de la arquitectura, en el diseño de edificios o viviendas podría darse el caso de que la gente no tenga que esperar para entrar en una habitación, y en lugar de una sala de espera, tal vez se pueda utilizar un sencillo vestíbulo.
  4. “Índice de relaciones entre términos”. La descripción del lenguaje debe de contemplar el índice que incluya aspectos gramaticales y sintácticos, con otros tipos de enlaces entre términos (patrones) de manera que el diseñador puede pensar rápidamente de una solución a soluciones relacionadas de una manera lógica.
  5. “Diseño”. La red de relaciones en el índice de la lengua permite muchas rutas diferentes a través del proceso de diseño. Esto simplifica el trabajo del diseñador, ya que el proceso puede comenzar desde cualquier parte del problema que el diseñador ya conoce, y caminar hacia lo que se quiere construir de nuevo en el diseño. No es preciso incluso que el diseñador comprenda de forma exhaustiva las razones que llevan a solucionar un problema para aceptar en un primer momento la estructura del patrón. Puede aceptarlo si el patrón ha funcionado bien y en un momento posterior comprenderlo, y el diseño resultante puede resultar utilizable. Por ejemplo, podríamos no comprender que el equipo de limpieza de los esquís se quedase fuera de la casa, y después comprender con el uso o incluso antes, que esto debe ser así porque los esquiadores se deshacen del equipo antes de entrar en casa. En este sentido el lenguaje de patrones no tiene porqué ser un instrumento de comunicación o de transmisión de información, o de procedimientos, sólo entre individuos de distintos niveles de experticia sino incluso de ámbitos de conocimiento diferentes. Puede ser un instrumento de comunicación y de trabajo interdisciplinar. La Figura 5 recoge nuestra propuesta de diseño. Las diferentes etapas están numeradas del 1 al 4, mientras que la sintaxis, la gramática y vocabulario aparecen clasificadas de la A a la E.

 

En el caso que nos planteamos, el del Pensamiento Computacional y de las actividades para el trabajo con DDL, los patrones pedagógicos pueden ser un instrumento de comunicación entre pedagogos (expertos en enseñanza), o psicólogos (expertos en aprendizaje), expertos en lingüística, expertos y educadores y diseñadores en didácticas específicas de todos los niveles educativos, etc. de una parte, e informáticos expertos en sistemas computacionales, desarrolladores, etc. De esta manera, y de igual forma que señalábamos en los ámbitos y con los ejemplos de arquitectura en los que no era preciso en un primer momento comprender enteramente la naturaleza de patrón, es decir no hace falta las razones que llevan a solucionar un problema, para aceptar la estructura del patrón, se pueden dar situaciones análogas en los patrones de Pensamiento Computacional. Así por ejemplo se pueden definir pautas (elementos de patrones no justificados) que tengan en cuenta los principios del aprendizaje significativo de Ausubel (Ausubel, 1963) o los principios de la secuenciación de contenidos de cualquiera de las teorías existentes, sin necesidad de comprender su esencia más profunda desde el primer momento.

Así pues, los lenguajes de patrón se utilizan para formalizar los valores de decisiones cuya efectividad resulta obvia a través de la experiencia, pero que es difícil de documentar y pasar a los aprendices. También son herramientas útiles a la hora de estructurar el conocimiento y comprender sistemas complejos sin caer en la simplificación extrema. Estos procesos incluyen la organización de personas o grupos que tienen que tomar decisiones complejas, y revelan cómo interactúan las diferentes funciones como parte del total.

Si los patrones están diseñados para acoger y tener en cuenta las mejores prácticas en un determinado dominio, los patrones de Pensamiento Computacional tratarán de alojar, para tener en cuenta el conocimiento de expertos en la práctica de la enseñanza de esta nueva alfabetización y en las características de aprendizaje e instruccional de los individuos y de los entornos donde se desarrolla el programa de formación. El objetivo es captar la esencia de la buena práctica en una forma resumida (abstrayendo los elementos más significativos) de manera que pueda ser fácilmente comunicada a los que la necesitan en un contexto de condiciones distinto. En su naturaleza el patrón puede ser igualmente la presentación de esta información (de las buenas prácticas, los conocimientos expertos, las soluciones a problemas,…) de una forma accesible y sistematizada, de manera que para cada nuevo diseñador pueda aprender o tener en cuenta lo que se conoce por expertos o por  profesores, o por otros especialistas, que hayan resuelto ya el problema en cuestión, y sea fácil la transferencia de conocimiento dentro de la comunidad.

 

3.2. Descripción de un patrón asociado a las actividades de DDL

Siguiendo lo establecido por Alexander, un patrón singular debe describirse en 3 partes:

  1. “Contexto” – ¿Bajo qué condiciones resolverá el problema la solución propuesta? Un aspecto importante de los patrones de diseño es identificar y documentar las ideas claves que hacen de un buen sistema un sistema diferente de un sistema normal (para construir una casa, un programa de ordenador, un objeto de uso cotidiano, o la secuencia de la iteración a un problema de embarque en aviones comerciales de pasajeros., o al diseño instruccional de una unidad de números en Primaria), y que ayude en el diseño de futuros sistemas. La idea que se expresa en un patrón debe ser lo suficientemente general para ser aplicadas en casos muy diferentes dentro de un contexto, pero aún lo suficientemente específico como para dar orientaciones constructivas. El contexto donde se aplica es pues el elemento definitorio del patrón. La gama pues de situaciones en las que los problemas y soluciones se resuelven desde un patrón se llama su contexto. De ahí se deriva que una parte importante de cada patrón es la descripción de su contexto. En el caso que nos ocupa, el contexto viene dado por la necesidad de entender y describir en comportamiento léxico-gramatical de una palabra (nodo) y de entender y describir la(s) cadena(s) sintagmática(s) en las que parece, los elementos léxicos que co-selecciona y los significados comunes a los que se asocia su uso. El Apartado 2.1 aborda este contexto específico en profundidad.

 

  1. “Sistema de fuerzas” – Se puede considerar como el problema o el objetivo. Frecuentemente estos problemas surgen en un conflicto de intereses encontrados o “fuerzas”. Un patrón emerge como un diálogo entre posturas contrapuestas o en tensión, de tal forma que la solución ayudará a equilibrar las fuerzas y finalmente a tomar una decisión. Por ejemplo, en un patrón cuya solución fuese utilizar un teléfono inalámbrico las fuerzas serían: por un lado la necesidad de comunicarse, y por otro la necesidad de hacer otras cosas al mismo tiempo (cocinar, limpiar el polvo, etc.). Un patrón muy concreto sería simplemente “utilizar teléfono inalámbrico”. Patrones más generales sería “dispositivo inalámbrico” o “actividad secundaria”, lo que sugiere que una actividad secundaria no debe interferir con otras actividades. En el caso que nos ocupa, el problema viene dado por la necesidad de describir el comportamiento de un elemento léxico o palabra (nodo) con datos reales de uso. En la Figura 5, A-D representan las tareas a realizar para la consecución de E.

 

  1. “Solución” – Es una configuración del sistema que pone las fuerzas en equilibrio o resuelve el problema presentado

 

Contexto → Sistema de fuerzas  → Solución

 

De esta forma un patrón siempre tendría: Una entrada, que es un nombre sencillo, una descripción concisa del problema, una solución definida, y suficiente información para ayudar al usuario a entender cuando debe aplicar esa solución. En la Figura 5, la solución vendría representada por E.

Figura 5. Patrón pedagógico propuesto para el trabajo con actividades DDL para el aprendizaje de lenguas.

Las tareas (A-D) utilizan elementos del pensamiento computacional aplicados, en este caso, a la resolución de un problema de índole lingüística (¿Cómo podemos describir el comportamiento de un nodo atendiendo a la distribución sintagmática y a la frecuencia del mismo en diferentes registros lingüísticos?). Algunos de los elementos de pensamiento computacional usados son   la metacognición, la sinéctica, la recursividad, la aproximación sucesiva, la heurística, la iteración, la creatividad, la resolución de problemas y los patrones. En el capítulo “Pensamiento computacional. Una tercera competencia clave” de esta misma obra se ofrece más información sobre estos y otros elementos del pensamiento computacional.

 

4. Conclusión

En este trabajo, el carácter pedagógico de los patrones y de sus lenguajes viene dado no sólo por su propia naturaleza y función en los procesos de aprendizaje, sino que se aplica a estructuras de información que permiten resumir y comunicar la experiencia acumulada y la resolución de problemas, tanto en la práctica como en el diseño, en programas de enseñanza y aprendizaje (Zapata-Ros, 2015). La utilización de patrones pedagógicos permite compartir buenas prácticas y sirve como referencia para nuevas aplicaciones y casos. El almacenamiento y proceso sistemático de estos patrones permite además construir no solo un corpus de información y una base de datos de referencias documentadas a las que los profesores, diseñadores instruccionales, profesionales o investigadores pueden dirigirse para sus trabajos específicos, sino también, por ser un instrumento de trabajo y de intercambio profesional (Zapata-Ros, 2015), posibilita un mejor entendimiento del papel del Pensamiento Computacional en un área educativa escasamente tratada: el aprendizaje de lenguas. De esta forma, nuestra contribución probablemente consiste en haber definido los elementos de lenguaje específicos del Pensamiento Computacional orientados al trabajo interdisciplinar: el de maestros, pedagogos, y expertos en computación o en diseño instruccional. Así, además de dar una propuesta general de los elementos que constituyen las componentes del lenguaje (Tabla 1), en ese mismo esquema ofrecemos una propuesta de desarrollo de futuras investigaciones que tendrán que determinar con mucho más nivel de detalle cuáles son los elementos de cada uno de esos apartados en relación con el Pensamiento Computacional y el aprendizaje de lenguas mediante datos (DDL).

El presente trabajo ofrece una taxonomía de conceptos y términos procedentes de Data-Driven-Learning (DDL) que rigen los criterios del tipo de análisis de datos necesarios en el aprendizaje inductivo del uso de la lengua mediante datos. Estos criterios se articulan no tanto como patrones de ubicación y colisión, contextos, frecuencias de palabras, etc., sino como patrones de uso y atribución de sentido. El patrón pedagógico propuesto para el trabajo con actividades DDL para el aprendizaje de lenguas (Figura 5) supone el reconocimiento del importante papel que el pensamiento computacional puede y debe jugar en DDL, en particular, y en el aprendizaje de lenguas, en general. DDL y el patrón pedagógico propuesto suponen la afirmación de la necesidad de profundizar en la alfabetización digital relacionada con el lenguaje propuesta por Pegrum (2016) y que, en parte, Dudney et al. (2013) concibieron como data literacy. Este subtipo de alfabetización reconoce el papel que el aprendiz juega en la toma de decisiones/aprendizaje por lo que es, precisamente, el individuo, el aprendiz, la pieza clave en el aprendizaje con datos.

La existencia de grandes bases de datos estructuradas de nada sirve si los aprendices no saben cómo gestionar la búsqueda, cribar los resultados, interpretar la importancia de los datos cuantitativos y cualitativos que se presentan y, en última instancia, formar conclusiones apoyadas en datos y su propia capacidad crítica. Es exactamente en este contexto en el que el uso de patrones pedagógicos puede ser de enrome utilidad al establecer un vínculo entre el conocimiento especialista propio de los lingüistas y la escasa motivación pedagógica de muchas de las aplicaciones DDL (Pérez-Paredes, 2010) en el aula de idiomas.


Tabla1.- Elementos de lenguaje de patrones del Pensamiento Computacional aplicados a las actividades DDL

 

 
Clase
Descripción
Elementos que lo componen
Ejemplos
Vocabulario Es el contenido del lenguaje. Lo constituyen una colección de términos, que de forma especializada van a ayudar a describir soluciones a los problemas “en un campo de interés”.  Términos obtenidos de la jerga de los programadores, pero con una formulación asequible al resto: relevantes para el ámbito semántico del PC, Corpus, nodo, concordanciero, líneas de concordancia, colocación, n-gram
Los propios elementos del Pensamiento computacional Metacognición, análisis ascendente, sinectica, recursividad,…
los procedentes de las ciencias conexas pero con relevancia para este dominio nuevo del lenguaje:

 

Heurístico, algoritmo, metacognición, elaboración, andamiaje cognitivos,…
Sintaxis Cada solución a un problema  incluye  una descripción insertándola en una solución, o en un contexto, más amplio, de manera que cada solución se ajusta a un diseño más grande, más amplio o más abstractos. De manera que cada solución se vincula a otras soluciones en una red de soluciones necesarias.

 

Reglas para organizar los elementos compuestos.

Un problema complejo normalmente necesita de varias formas de pensamiento computacional y sobre todo de un contexto amplio.

En la resolución de un problema de álgebra (de un sistema lineal) los elementos irán ensamblados por relaciones. En nuestro caso, el proceso de resolución es initiate > interpret > consolidate > report.
Gramática Está constituida por elementos que son la descripción del problema y de la solución. En la idea de que cada patrón, cada solución, incluye la descripción del problema que resuelve y cómo lo hace, y el beneficio que se obtiene.  En el caso del PC cada elemento está constituido por un problema descrito en un lenguaje comprensible por todos los que componen el equipo multidisciplinar que lo aborda y por los elementos teóricos y prácticos que fundamentan la solución así como la descripción del procedimiento para resolverlo así como las herramientas informáticas que se han desarrollado o pueden ser útiles. En el problema del viajante (TSP, Traveling Salesman Problem) (Zapata-Ros, 2015 pp 22,23) el elemento de Gramática está constituido por la descripción del problema y la solución, entendiendo que en ella se incluyen los elementos teóricos y procedimentales que son necesarios: la parte de Teoría de grafos que es necesaria para resolverlo, y el método específico opt y k-opt, o heurística Lin-Kernighan, así como las herramientas informáticas que se han desarrollado o pueden ser útiles.
Índice de relaciones entre términos La descripción del lenguaje debe de contemplar el índice que incluya aspectos gramaticales y sintácticos, con otros tipos de enlaces entre términos (patrones) de manera que el diseñador puede pensar rápidamente de una solución a soluciones relacionadas de una manera lógica.  En el caso del PC, las relaciones pueden ser la de secuenciación, qué orden seguirán los elementos para ser utilizados en un problema, y necesidad: Para resolver el problema A hace falta el elemento B, como relaciones más importantes, pero hay muchas más que pueden surgir fruto de un análisis que vaya más allá de los objetivos de este trabajo. Para resolver el problema del viajante (TSP, Traveling Salesman Problem) (Zapata-Ros, 2015 pp 22,23) es necesario el método opt y k-opt, o heurística Lin-Kernighan,
Diseño Las relaciones pueden integrarse en estructuras complejas y orientadas a la resolución de un problema. Entonces su elaboración y las técnicas para hacerla constituyen el diseño. La red de relaciones en el índice de la lengua permite muchas rutas diferentes a través del proceso de diseño. Esto simplifica el trabajo del diseñador, ya que el proceso puede comenzar desde cualquier parte del problema que el diseñador ya conoce, y caminar hacia lo que se quiere construir de nuevo en el diseño. No es preciso incluso que el diseñador comprenda de forma exhaustiva las razones que llevan a solucionar un problema para aceptar en un primer momento la estructura del patrón. Puede aceptarlo si el patrón ha funcionado bien y en un momento posterior comprenderlo, y el diseño resultante puede resultar utilizable. En el caso del PC el diseño de patrones precisaría definir cuales aspectos del patrón son indiferentes del problema que queramos resolver, e incluso qué elementos es preciso analizar entre problemas de naturaleza diferente para que se pueda utilizar el mismo patrón. Por ejemplo: qué tienen de común el problema del viajante y el problema del embarque de los pasajeros en un avión para que podamos utilizar el mismo algoritmo o un algoritmo de la misma naturaleza.

En un trabajo de elaboración de un lenguaje de patrones para el PC habría pues de delimitar y definir estos elementos de diseño.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pérez-Paredes, P. y  Zapata-Ros, M. (2018).  Patrones de Pensamiento Computacional y corpus lingüísticos: el aprendizaje de lenguas con datos lingüísticos (Preprint). http://eprints.rclis.org/32209/

Referencias

 Alexander, C. (1977). A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction. Oxford University Press.

Alexander, C., Ishikawa, S. y Silverstein, M. (1977). A Pattern Language. Oxford University Press. http://library.uniteddiversity.coop/Ecological_Building/A_Pattern_Language.pdf

Ausubel, D. P. (1963). The psychology of meaningful verbal learning; an introduction to school learning. New York: Grune & Stratton.

Ballance, O. J. (2017). Pedagogical models of concordance use: correlations between concordance user preferences. Computer Assisted Language Learning30(3-4), 259-283.

Biber, D., Johansson, S., Leech, G., Conrad, S., Finegan, E., & Quirk, R. (1999). Longman grammar of spoken and written English. Harlow: Longman.

Biber, D., & Conrad, S. (2009). Register, genre, and style. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Boulton, A., & Pérez-Paredes, P. (2014). ReCALL special issue: Researching uses of corpora for language teaching and learning. Editorial Researching uses of corpora for language teaching and learning. ReCALL26(2), 121-127.

Chomsky, N. (1965). Aspects of the Theory of Syntax. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Cunningham, W. (1995a). The Portland Pattern Repository. Cunningham & Cunningham. Consultado el [dd/mm/aaaa] en Inc,.. http://www.c2.com/

Cunningham, W. (1995b). Tips For Writing Pattern Languages. Consultado el [dd/mm/aaaa] en http://www.c2.com/cgi/wiki?TipsForWritingPatternLanguages

DeLano, D.E. y Rising, L. (1997). Introducing Technology into the Workplace. Proceedings PLoP’97 Conference. Consultado el [dd/mm/aaaa] en http://hillside.net/plop/plop97/Proceedings/delano.pdf

Dudeney, G., Hockly, N., & Pegrum, M. (2013). Digital Literacies. Harlow: Pearson.

Ellis, P., Hunston, S. Manning, E. (1996). Grammar Patterns 1: Verbs (COBUILD). New York: Collins.

Flowerdew, L. (2015). Data-Driven learning and language learning theories. In Leńko- Agnieszka Szymańska, & Alex Boulton (eds.) Multiple Affordances in Language Corpora for Data-Driven Learning. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, pp. 15-36.

Fricke, A. y Voelter, M. (2000). SEMINARS: A Pedagogical Pattern Language about teaching seminars, [en línea]. Trabajo presentado en EuroPLoP 2000. Disponible en: http://www.voelter.de/publications/seminars.html [2008, 2 diciembre].

Novak, J.D.: Teoría y práctica de la educación. Alianza Universidad, Madrid, 1988. Pedagogical Patterns Project (2008), [en línea]. Disponible en: http://www.pedagogicalpatterns.org/ [2008, Enero]

O’keeffe, A., McCarthy, M., & Carter, R. (2007). From corpus to classroom: Language use and language teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Pegrum, M. (2016). Languages and literacies for digital lives. In Elenea Martín-Momnje, Izaskun Eloraz & Blanca García Riaza (eds) Technology-Enhanced Language Learning for Specialized Domains, pp. 9-22.

Basanta, C. P., & Martín, M. E. R. (2007). The application of data-driven learning to a small-scale corpus: using film transcripts for teaching conversational skills. Language and computers studies in practical linguistics61(1), 141-147.

Pérez-Paredes, P. (2010). Corpus linguistics and language education in perspective: Appropriation and the possibilities scenario. Corpus linguistics in language teaching. Bern: Peter Lang, 53-73.

Pérez-Paredes, P., & Díez Bedmar, B. (2010). Language corpora and the language classroom. Materiales de formación del profesorado de lengua extranjera Inglés. Murcia: Consejería de Educación, 1-48.

Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M., Alcaraz Calero, J. M., & Jiménez, P. A. (2011). Tracking learners’ actual uses of corpora: guided vs non-guided corpus consultation. Computer Assisted Language Learning24(3), 233-253.

Sinclair, J. (1991). Corpus, concordance, collocation. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Sinclair, J. (2003). Reading concordances: an introduction. Harlow: Pearson Longman.

Sinclair, J. & Mauranen, A. (2006). Linear unit grammar: Integrating speech and writing. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing.

Zapata, M. (2005a). SEQUENCING OF CONTENTS AND LEARNING OBJECTS. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, número 13. Available: dd/mm/yy http://www.um.es/ead/red/13/

Zapata, M. (2005b). SEQUENCING OF CONTENTS AND LEARNING OBJECTS – part II. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, número 14. Available: http://www.um.es/ead/red/14/

Zapata, M. (2005,c). Secuenciación de contenidos y objetos de aprendizaje. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, número monográfico II. Consultado el 9 de Febrero, 2005, en http://www.um.es/ead/red/M2/zapata47.pdf

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia. Número 46.  15 de Septiembre de 2015. Consultado el (dd/mm/aa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/46

Bibliografía básica de referencia en computación

Gamma, E. et al. (1995). Design Patterns. Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software – Gamma, Helm, Johnson, Vlissides – Addison Wesley

Gamma, E. et al. (1995). Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object Oriented Software. Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, John Vlissides, http://www.cs.up.ac.za/cs/aboake/sws780/references/patternstoarchitecture/Gama-DesignPatternsIntro.pdf

Gamma, E. et al. (2006) Patrones de diseño: elementos de software orientado a objetos reutilizables. Addison-Wesley.

Buschmann et al. (1995) A System of Patterns– Wiley

Larman, (1999) UML y Patrones. Introducción al análisis y diseño orientado a objetos – – Prentice Hall.

Brown, et al. (2004). AntiPatterns. Refactoring Software, Architectures and Projects in Crisis – Wiley.

 

Referencias en la web

The Portland Pattern Repository. Cunningham & Cunningham, Inc, , de Ward Cunningham.. http://www.c2.com/

Tips For Writing Pattern Languages, , de Ward Cunningham. http://www.c2.com/cgi/wiki?TipsForWritingPatternLanguages

Architypes.net – proyecto de lenguajes de patrón comunitarios de arquitectura http://www.architypes.net/pattern/categorizations

Liberating Voices! Proyecto de lenguajes de patrón, http://www.publicsphereproject.org/patterns/

El sitio de Christopher Alexander patternlanguage.com http://www.patternlanguage.com/

Ensayo sobre los lenguajes de patrón y su uso en el diseño urbano. Christopher Alexander . http://www.gardenvisit.com/history_theory/library_online_ebooks/architecture_city_as_landscape/christopher_alexanders_city_not_tree

Patrones de Pensamiento Computacional y corpus lingüísticos: el aprendizaje de lenguas con datos lingüísticos (I)

Pascual Pérez-Paredes, University of Cambridge.

 

 

 

Miguel Zapata-Ros, Universidad de Alcalá

 

1. Introducción a los patrones pedagógicos

 

En este trabajo abordaremos el problema general de cómo favorecer la comunicación y el trabajo colaborativo entre educadores, diseñadores instruccionales y otros profesionales vinculados al dominio del conocimiento que constituye el pensamiento computacional en el contexto de aprendizaje de lenguas. Para ello abordaremos el problema desde la experiencia, la teoría desarrollada y la práctica que ofrecen los patrones, hasta ahora desarrollados en los ámbitos de la computación, de la arquitectura y el urbanismo, la lingüística de corpus y, más recientemente, el aprendizaje en entornos conectados y ubicuos de aprendizaje.

 

El concepto de patrón y su práctica en estos dominios del conocimiento se aplica a estructuras de información que permiten resumir y comunicar la experiencia acumulada y la resolución de problemas, tanto en la práctica como en el diseño, en actividades específicas de esos ámbitos de desarrollo y de trabajo. De esta forma un patrón puede entenderse como una plantilla, una guía, un conjunto de directrices o de normas de diseño. Los patrones pueden entenderse desde dos perspectivas: Desde las técnicas y teorías especificas del ámbito de problemas en el que trabajemos, en este caso desde el ámbito del Pensamiento Computacional, o bien desde la perspectiva de los lenguajes y las técnicas computacionales, no solo hipertextuales, que permiten el desarrollo de patrones. Un patrón pues permite la adquisición de “buenas prácticas” y sirve como referencia para nuevas aplicaciones y casos. El almacenamiento y proceso sistemático de estos patrones permite construir corpus de información o bases de datos de referencias documentadas a las que los profesores, diseñadores instruccionales, profesionales o investigadores pueden dirigirse para sus trabajos específicos.

Los patrones de e-learning tienen su origen en los patrones de diseño o en lo patrones en general para aplicar en un campo cualquiera de la actividad de creación y de desarrollo, donde se quiere optimizar el trabajo intelectual haciendo más eficaz el trabajo empleado. Originalmente los patrones de diseño se deben al arquitecto Christopher Alexander. Posteriormente, estas técnicas se han adoptado en la ingeniería de software, desde donde se han incorporado al diseño instruccional tecnológico. Sin embargo, es conveniente atribuirle un sentido instruccional utilizando lo que se pueda de este ámbito como del de las teorías del aprendizaje.

Podríamos plantearnos pues qué son en esencia los patrones. Un patrón (Alexander et al., 1977 p X) “describe un problema que ocurre una y otra vez en nuestro entorno y, a continuación, describe el núcleo de la solución de ese problema, de tal manera que el usuario puede utilizar esta solución un millón de veces más, sin tener que hacerlo de la misma manera dos veces”. Igualmente podemos plantearnos qué son los patrones instruccionales, aunque el término igualmente acuñado puede ser el de patrones pedagógicos (Pedagogical Patterns Project, 2008).

En esencia un patrón resuelve un problema. Este problema debe ser una naturaleza tal que se repita en distintos contextos. En el ámbito del pensamiento computacional tenemos muchos problemas de esta naturaleza, de hecho constituye la esencia de su naturaleza. Son, por ejemplo, los relacionados con la iteración, el pensamiento divergente o la metacognición.

A este planteamiento se puede añadir el de carácter general que se desarrolla para la elaboración de los patrones pedagógicos. No en balde la perspectiva del pensamiento computacional es una perspectiva pedagógica. El Pedagogical Patterns Project (2008) establece una clasificación de los patrones pedagógicos en tres categorías:

  • Aprendizaje activo. Un patrón de este tipo se basaría en un conjunto de actividades que involucren a los alumnos de manera activa. El patrón se construye utilizando algún problema concreto que a menudo pueden ocurrir en un entorno de enseñanza y que maximice la atención del alumno por estar implicado en la resolución, o por sus experiencias pasadas o presentes, por su carácter real etc.
  • Aprendizaje experimental. Un patrón de este tipo se basaría en lo que es necesario aprender mediante la experimentación o bien mediante las experiencias pasadas de los alumnos estudiantes.
  • Enseñando desde diferentes perspectivas. Un patrón de este tipo se basaría en la bondad de los aprendizajes que supone por los alumnos el estudio de los recursos educativos desde diferentes perspectivas, tratando los siguientes problemas: preparar al estudiante para el mundo real, hacer uso de diferentes perspectivas por pares (por ejemplo, utilizando personal profesional de empresa).

A lo anterior podríamos añadir “aprendizaje autónomo” y “aprendizaje basado en problemas”. En esta catalogación podríamos estudiar, de hecho, dejamos esa puerta abierta a los patrones de aprendizaje divergente, patrones de aprendizaje creativo y a toda una serie de patrones cada uno de los cuales tiene que ver con una forma de aprendizaje asociada a un elemento del pensamiento computacional

La naturaleza de estos problemas, los que son objeto de patrones, es, como vemos, que se pueden repetir de forma diferente (en partes no sustanciales) cada vez. Y cuando aparece un problema de este tipo conlleva consideraciones a tener en cuenta para tomar las decisiones en la selección del procedimiento a utilizar para la resolución. Estas consideraciones son las que influyen en los expertos a optar por una u otra resolución. Son las consideraciones que el patrón presenta para que las tengamos en cuenta en nuestra elección y que nos pueden acercar o alejar de una buena solución al problema.  Un patrón presenta un problema y una solución. O bien el criterio de la solución. De tal forma que los criterios que deben aplicarse deben hacer que la solución sea la más acertada para el problema planteado.

 

2. El aprendizaje de lenguas con datos lingüísticos: lingüística de corpus y DDL

La utilización de patrones pedagógicos basados en el pensamiento computacional para la adquisición de lenguas nos permite asomarnos a una concepción del lenguaje y de la comunicación que es el resultado de la evolución de diversas técnicas analíticas de índole cuantitativa que se han desarrollado aproximadamente en los últimos 40 años. En concreto, el aprendizaje con corpus lingüísticos (Data Driven Learning) es un área que en la actualidad atrae a un importante número de investigadores procedentes de la lingüística aplicada, la lingüística de corpus y la adquisición de segundas lenguas.

En los siguientes párrafos trazaremos una ruta que nos permita entender cómo la utilización de corpus lingüísticos ha favorecido la formulación de una teoría lingüística que explica el uso de la lengua, su análisis y aprendizaje como la intersección entre registros (tipo de texto, p.ej. ficción, texto periodístico, manual académico, etc.), función comunicativa (intención del hablante, p.ej. describir, explicar, etc.) y el uso de patrones lingüísticos (patterns) de índole léxico-gramatical. Estos últimos constituyen la parte formal en la que se perfeccionan las elecciones sintagmáticas y paradigmáticas de los hablantes y que, como veremos más adelante, no forman generalmente parte de los currículos oficiales enseñanza de lenguas (Pérez-Paredes, 2010).

 

2.1 Primera aproximación a Data Driven Learning (DDL): de la teoría lingüística a la lingüística aplicada al aprendizaje de lenguas

 

La lingüística del Corpus, así como los métodos de investigación que se asocian a esta ciencia lingüística, se utilizan con la finalidad de profundizar en lo que el lingüista John Sinclair (Sinclair, 1992, 2003) describió como nuevas unidades de significado. Estás unidades sobrepasan la dicotomía que estableció Saussure entre significado y significante a nivel de palabra y, a grandes rasgos, cuestionan el nivel léxico de análisis, la palabra si se quiere, como unidad fundamental de análisis del uso de la lengua. La gran mayoría de lingüistas del corpus trabajan con la hipótesis de que los niveles de análisis léxico y gramatical están tan intrínsecamente unidos que no es posible entender y describir fenómenos asociados al uso de la lengua sin utilizar ambos ámbitos de análisis de forma integrada en el análisis de patrones lingüísticos. Esta forma de entender la lengua (Sinclair & Mauranen, 2006) ha ido cobrando forma y ganando adhesiones, en gran parte gracias a la utilización métodos de análisis cuantitativos que abordan la relación entre ambos ámbitos.

Durante las últimas décadas, la lingüística del corpus ha demostrado que el uso de la lengua presenta una tendencia muy marcada a la utilización de patrones léxico gramaticales que se repiten de forma sistemática en diferentes registros comunicativos, por ejemplo, por citar dos registros bien diferentes, en conversaciones telefónicas con conocidos o en artículos de investigación. El análisis del uso de la lengua basado en datos ha supuesto una revolución en la lingüística de corte Chomskyano, la cual, favorecía una concepción generativista de la lengua: “a generative grammar must be a system of rules that can iterate to generate an indefinitely large number of structures. This system of rules can be analyzed into the three major components […] the syntactic component of a grammar must specify, for each sentence, a deep structure that determines its semantic interpretation and a surface structure that determines its phonetic interpretation” (Chomsky, 1965: 15-6). En esta gramática generativista de la lengua, los patrones de uso léxico-gramaticales y su frecuencia no jugaban papel alguno, ya que el objeto de análisis del lingüista recaía en el estudio de las estructuras profundas que condicionan la producción lingüística accesible mediante nuestros sentidos a los interlocutores en un proceso comunicativo determinado.

Biber y Conrtad (2009) sostienen que la variación lingüística es sistemática y que se articula en torno a diferentes funciones que se perfeccionan en diferentes tipos de registros lingüísticos. Por ejemplo, gracias al estudio de grandes cantidades de datos lingüísticos, sabemos que, en la lengua inglesa, el uso de pronombres es estadísticamente más frecuente en conversaciones que en otros registros (p.ej. inglés académico o en lenguaje periodístico). La conversación tiene lugar en contextos donde los interlocutores comparten tiempo y referencias espaciales, por lo que podemos hablar de la existencia de un contexto compartido que facilita la utilización de, entre otros, deícticos y formas pro-nominales. Este hecho condiciona las oportunidades de uso de modificadores en el sintagma nominal, ya que los sintagmas preposicionales que suelen aparecer en posición post nominal lo hacen más frecuentemente detrás de núcleos sintagmáticos ocupados por nombres en vez de por pronombres (Biber et al., 1999). Este ejemplo, pese a su sencillez, muestra que los registros (conversación, registro académico, periodístico, etc) presentan una orientación funcional que a su vez condiciona las posibilidades léxico gramaticales que los usuarios del lenguaje tienen a su disposición cuándo generan y crean contenidos, esto es, cuando se comunican.

En la década de los 90, John Sinclair y su equipo desarrollaron materiales para el aprendizaje de lenguas en los que se describían los patrones (patterns) utilizados en la lengua inglesa procedentes del Bank of English[1] y desarrollados junto al diccionario Cobuild en la Universidad de Birmingham. Citaremos aquí un ejemplo de estos patrones lingüísticos con la finalidad de que el lector entienda con precisión el concepto que nos ocupa. Tomemos la siguiente estructura gramatical (Ellis, Hunston & Manning, 1996):

Figura 1. Un ejemplo de patrón léxico gramatical extraído del corpus Bank of English.

Estamos ante una secuencia de verbo (1) seguido de un sintagma proposicional (2) complementado a su vez por un sintagma nominal cuyo núcleo es un grupo nominal compuesto (3). Un ejemplo de esta secuencia sería (She) alternated (1) between (2) anger and depression (3). Al examinar todos los ejemplos de esta secuencia en el corpus, los autores encontraron que la posición (1) está sistemáticamente ocupada por un grupo muy restringido de verbos que, a su vez, expresan un rango de significados que determinan que la posición (3) se vea ocupada por un rango limitado de nombres. En la Figura 2 el lector podrá apreciar los grupos de verbos en la posición (1) y sus significados:

Figura 2. Grupos verbales que ocupan la posición (1) en la secuencia ejemplificada.

Los verbos que aparecen en la posición (1) se ocupan de relaciones entre personas o cosas con la finalidad de ayudar, diferenciar, elegir o informar sobre un rango de posibilidades o acciones. Por cuestiones de espacio, en la Figura 2 nos centramos en el tercer grupo de verbos (alternate group). Según los datos extraídos del corpus, los verbos que ocupan esta posición son alternate, flit, oscillate, vacillate y waver. Cuando van seguidos de la preposición between y un nombre en plural, el hablante quiere exponer la existencia de una alternativa que, generalmente, implica la aceptación de un escenario negativo en el que se ha de tomar una decisión. Los siguientes dos ejemplos extraídos del Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA)[2] ilustran esta secuencia con el verbo waver:

COCA:1998:ACAD

AfricaToday   rather to reassure us of the solidarity of its foundations. While former times constantly wavered between lofty ideologies building international castles in the air, and coarse scepticism or even)

COCA:1995:FIC

It seemed to take longer to drive back. A sobering interlude where Kelsey wavered between tears and anger. Most of the anger died by the time she pulled)

 

Curiosamente, en nuestra búsqueda encontramos que la mayoría de usos recientes de esta secuencia utilizan nombres abstractos en vez de nombres comunes. Sin duda, no es el lugar para indagar de forma más extensa en esta observación, pero el lector se hará cargo de las posibilidades que ofrece la utilización de este tipo de datos estructurados que nos permite conocer el tipo de registro usado (ficción, lenguaje periodístico), el medio usado (oral, escrito), la variedad (en este caso inglés americano), año de producción, etc. El siguiente ejemplo de uso también procede del corpus COCA:

COCA:2015:FIC

Again there were the Red Gross lines, again the harried crowd wavered between capitulation and outrage. We looked out on our unfamiliar neighbors, all of)

Ahora bien, ¿cómo llega un aprendiz a la Figura 2 partiendo del input en la Figura 1? Desde el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas, se proponen teorías (Usage-based theory) que sostienen que el uso de lenguaje y el conocimiento que poseemos del mismo están condicionados tanto por la exposición al uso de la lengua como por procesos cognitivos de índole general (domain general), no necesariamente específicos y singulares. Se sostiene que el aprendizaje de una lengua, bien sea la lengua materna como una segunda o una tercera lengua, depende del input recibido por el aprendiz o hablante. En este sentido estamos ante una teoría que cuestiona los postulados fundamentales de la lingüística Chomsky en lo concerniente a la lengua materna. No es este el lugar para abundar en esta teoría, pero basté citar aquí las contribuciones de la gramática de construcciones o las contribuciones de la lingüística cognitiva a la semántica de las construcciones. La utilización de actividades DDL pueden permitir al aprendiz de lenguas acceder a un conocimiento que de forma intuitiva puede llegar a poseer un hablante nativo de la lengua en al menos algunos de los numerosos registros de uso de la lengua.

 

2.2. DDL y pensamiento computacional

En pleno siglo XXI, en la era del big data, la utilización de datos lingüísticos en forma de corpus nos abre una puerta al estudio y comprensión de los usos comunicativos de una forma nunca antes contemplada en la enseñanza reglada de idiomas. La utilización de herramientas del Corpus para la enseñanza y el aprendizaje de lenguas comenzó en la década de los 90 (Boulton & Pérez-Paredes, 2014), cuando se acuña el término Data-driven-learning (DDL). Mediante el mismo, los estudiantes pueden acceder a un conocimiento sobre el uso de la L2 que, por diversos motivos, no suele formar parte del currículo oficial en la enseñanza de lenguas (Pérez-Paredes, 2010). O’Keeffe, McCarthy & Carter (2007:21) resumen así algunos de los beneficios del uso de corpus lingüísticos, en general, y de DDL, en particular:

As well as providing an empirical basis for checking our intuitions about language, corpora have also brought to light features about language which had eluded our intuition […] In terms of what we actually teach, numerous studies have shown us that the language presented in textbooks is frequently still based on intuitions about how we use language, rather than actual evidence of use. It seems that language corpora can help us discover that which apparently appears undisputed in prescriptive or in intuition-led textbooks and other reference materials.

 

DDL utiliza actividades inductivas (Flowerdew, 2015) mediante las cuales los aprendices se convierten en investigadores, en aprendices activos en busca de patrones lingüísticos mediante el acceso a grandes cantidades de información.  Este enfoque activo contrasta con las metodologías más tradicionales, deductivas, basadas en el conocimiento conceptual (Pérez Basanta & Rodríguez Martín, 2007: 146-7).  Según Pérez-Paredes & Díez Bedmar (2010), para usar DDL el estudiante debe estar familiarizado al menos con seis conceptos fundamentales en la lingüística de corpus, a saber:

  • ¿Qué es un corpus lingüístico? ¿Qué supone buscar información en él? ¿En qué forma es representativo de un idioma o de una variedad?
  • Interfaz de búsqueda o concordanciero. El interfaz de búsqueda suele ser un servicio web que nos permite acceder al corpus y extraer información del mismo.
  • Listado de palabras. En un corpus, el listado de palabras es el listado de los elementos léxicos que aparecen el mismo junto a su frecuencia relativa.
  • N-grams. Los N-grams son agrupaciones lineales de términos léxicos que aparecen de forma frecuente en un determinado corpus. Pueden estar constituidos por n elementos, aunque frecuentemente el rango se establece entre 3 y 5.
  • Líneas de concordancia o concordancias. Es el resultado de una búsqueda

usando un concordanciero. Los elementos buscados son los nodos que aparecen centrados en la pantalla y a su izquierda y derecha encontramos las palabras que acompañan al nodo en la cadena sintagmática.

  • Dado un nodo determinado, las colocacionesson las palabras que estadísticamente tienden a aparecer conjuntamente con él. Dicho de otra forma, las colocaciones son las agrupaciones de elementos léxicos que se atraen de forma significativa.

 

En su forma más básica, los aprendices buscan un término léxico en un corpus mediante un concordanciero, obtienen una serie de líneas de concordancia, las examinan, las interpretan, formulan hipótesis sobre el uso de lengua y cómo las relaciones entre elementos discretos y significados se acoplan, vuelven a buscar más datos en el corpus, vuelven a examinar las líneas de concordancia y finalmente llegan a una conclusión sobre el funcionamiento de la lengua que implica tanto el comportamiento de elementos léxicos discretos (palabras) como patrones lingüísticos en cadenas sintagmáticas de mayor longitud. La Figura 3 ilustra este proceso de trabajo según Sinclair (2003) y Pérez-Paredes et al. (2011):

Figura 3. Etapas de la consulta de un corpus durante actividades de DDL (Sinclair, 2003; Pérez-Paredes et al., 2011).

El citado proceso implica que el aprendiz aborde de forma autónoma una actividad inductiva con un gran potencial para un aprendizaje del uso de la lengua más próximo al conocimiento intuitivo de un hablante nativo que al conocimiento declarativo que se adquiere en las clases de idioma. Tomemos el ejemplo de waver, visto con anterioridad. En la Figura 4 podemos ver cómo la información que nos ofrece un diccionario en línea (A) es muy limitada y se circunscribe a diversos sentidos de la palabra tanto como verbo como nombre. Un solo ejemplo de uso se ofrece para cada una de las acepciones. Un aprendiz de lengua con las herramientas adecuadas podría acceder a una comprensión más profunda de los contextos y frecuencia de usos en los que este término léxico se utiliza. En (B), podemos ver cómo en el corpus de inglés americano contemporáneo COCA (aprox. >>500 millones de palabras) podemos obtener información sobre los registros de usos (lenguaje oral, académico, etc.) así como sobre la diacronía de estos usos. En el caso que nos ocupa, waver es mucho más frecuente en lenguaje literario que, por ejemplo, en lenguaje oral. En (C) usamos un corpus aún mayor, NOW, un corpus de noticias en inglés recopilado desde 2010 y compuesto por 5500 millones de palabras. Podemos apreciar las colocaciones de esta palabra y comprobar cómo aparece, generalmente, en contextos de negación en el sintagma verbal. En (D), finalmente, podemos acceder a lagunas de estas líneas de concordancia donde waver aparece con not y en donde podemos apreciar que aparece frecuentemente seguido de las preposiciones in y on. El lector habrá apreciado que ninguno de estos datos aparecía en el diccionario consultado (A).

           

Figura 4. Búsqueda de waver en un diccionario en línea (A), el corpus COCA (B) y en el corpus NOW (C y D).

Pérez-Paredes (2010) y Ballance (2017) han apuntado que uno de los principales retos que presenta el uso de DDL es que se utilizan herramientas propias de la lingüística del corpus que precisan de las habilidades de un experto lingüista en al menos las fases (2) y (3) glosadas en la Figura 3. Pérez-Paredes (2010: 55) sostiene que la utilización de DDL en contextos de aula no se ha visto acompañada de un esfuerzo pedagógico que adaptase las etapas de consulta y confirmación de hipótesis expuestas en la Figura 3:

It does not strike us as a surprise that the classroom-based research which reports [the use of DDL] applications has paid very little attention to the pedagogic transfer which is essential in the adaptation of methods and corpora which were devised for language research purposes.

En el siguiente apartado presentaremos el diseño de un patrón pedagógico aplicado al uso de DDL para el aprendizaje de lenguas que persigue especificar cada una de las tareas implicadas en el trabajo con datos lingüísticos en el contexto del aprendizaje con datos.

[1] For information on the Bank of English, please visit the following URL: http://www.titania.bham.ac.uk/docs/svenguide.html

[2] URL: https://corpus.byu.edu/coca/

Pérez-Paredes, P. y Zapata-Ros, M. (2018). Patrones de Pensamiento Computacional y corpus lingüísticos: el aprendizaje de lenguas con datos lingüísticos (I) (Preprint de capítulo de libro). RED de Hypotheses.  https://red.hypotheses.org/1025

Referencias

 

Alexander, C. (1977). A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction. Oxford University Press.

Alexander, C., Ishikawa, S. y Silverstein, M. (1977). A Pattern Language. Oxford University Press. http://library.uniteddiversity.coop/Ecological_Building/A_Pattern_Language.pdf

Ausubel, D. P. (1963). The psychology of meaningful verbal learning; an introduction to school learning. New York: Grune & Stratton.

Ballance, O. J. (2017). Pedagogical models of concordance use: correlations between concordance user preferences. Computer Assisted Language Learning30(3-4), 259-283.

Biber, D., Johansson, S., Leech, G., Conrad, S., Finegan, E., & Quirk, R. (1999). Longman grammar of spoken and written English. Harlow: Longman.

Biber, D., & Conrad, S. (2009). Register, genre, and style. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Boulton, A., & Pérez-Paredes, P. (2014). ReCALL special issue: Researching uses of corpora for language teaching and learning. Editorial Researching uses of corpora for language teaching and learning. ReCALL26(2), 121-127.

Chomsky, N. (1965). Aspects of the Theory of Syntax. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Cunningham, W. (1995a). The Portland Pattern Repository. Cunningham & Cunningham. Consultado el [dd/mm/aaaa] en Inc,.. http://www.c2.com/

Cunningham, W. (1995b). Tips For Writing Pattern Languages. Consultado el [dd/mm/aaaa] en http://www.c2.com/cgi/wiki?TipsForWritingPatternLanguages

DeLano, D.E. y Rising, L. (1997). Introducing Technology into the Workplace. Proceedings PLoP’97 Conference. Consultado el [dd/mm/aaaa] en http://hillside.net/plop/plop97/Proceedings/delano.pdf

Dudeney, G., Hockly, N., & Pegrum, M. (2013). Digital Literacies. Harlow: Pearson.

Ellis, P., Hunston, S. Manning, E. (1996). Grammar Patterns 1: Verbs (COBUILD). New York: Collins.

Flowerdew, L. (2015). Data-Driven learning and language learning theories. In Leńko- Agnieszka Szymańska, & Alex Boulton (eds.) Multiple Affordances in Language Corpora for Data-Driven Learning. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, pp. 15-36.

Fricke, A. y Voelter, M. (2000). SEMINARS: A Pedagogical Pattern Language about teaching seminars, [en línea]. Trabajo presentado en EuroPLoP 2000. Disponible en: http://www.voelter.de/publications/seminars.html [2008, 2 diciembre].

Novak, J.D.: Teoría y práctica de la educación. Alianza Universidad, Madrid, 1988. Pedagogical Patterns Project (2008), [en línea]. Disponible en: http://www.pedagogicalpatterns.org/ [2008, Enero]

 

O’keeffe, A., McCarthy, M., & Carter, R. (2007). From corpus to classroom: Language use and language teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Pegrum, M. (2016). Languages and literacies for digital lives. In Elenea Martín-Momnje, Izaskun Eloraz & Blanca García Riaza (eds) Technology-Enhanced Language Learning for Specialized Domains, pp. 9-22.

Basanta, C. P., & Martín, M. E. R. (2007). The application of data-driven learning to a small-scale corpus: using film transcripts for teaching conversational skills. Language and computers studies in practical linguistics61(1), 141-147.

Pérez-Paredes, P. (2010). Corpus linguistics and language education in perspective: Appropriation and the possibilities scenario. Corpus linguistics in language teaching. Bern: Peter Lang, 53-73.

Pérez-Paredes, P., & Díez Bedmar, B. (2010). Language corpora and the language classroom. Materiales de formación del profesorado de lengua extranjera Inglés. Murcia: Consejería de Educación, 1-48.

Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M., Alcaraz Calero, J. M., & Jiménez, P. A. (2011). Tracking learners’ actual uses of corpora: guided vs non-guided corpus consultation. Computer Assisted Language Learning24(3), 233-253.

Sinclair, J. (1991). Corpus, concordance, collocation. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Sinclair, J. (2003). Reading concordances: an introduction. Harlow: Pearson Longman.

Sinclair, J. & Mauranen, A. (2006). Linear unit grammar: Integrating speech and writing. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing.

Zapata, M. (2005a). SEQUENCING OF CONTENTS AND LEARNING OBJECTS. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, número 13. Available: dd/mm/yy http://www.um.es/ead/red/13/

Zapata, M. (2005b). SEQUENCING OF CONTENTS AND LEARNING OBJECTS – part II. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, número 14. Available: http://www.um.es/ead/red/14/

Zapata, M. (2005,c). Secuenciación de contenidos y objetos de aprendizaje. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia, número monográfico II. Consultado el 9 de Febrero, 2005, en http://www.um.es/ead/red/M2/zapata47.pdf

Zapata-Ros, M. (2015). Pensamiento computacional: Una nueva alfabetización digital. RED. Revista de Educación a Distancia. Número 46.  15 de Septiembre de 2015. Consultado el (dd/mm/aa) en http://www.um.es/ead/red/46

 

Bibliografía básica de referencia en computación

Gamma, E. et al. (1995). Design Patterns. Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software – Gamma, Helm, Johnson, Vlissides – Addison Wesley

Gamma, E. et al. (1995). Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object Oriented Software. Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, John Vlissides, http://www.cs.up.ac.za/cs/aboake/sws780/references/patternstoarchitecture/Gama-DesignPatternsIntro.pdf

Gamma, E. et al. (2006) Patrones de diseño: elementos de software orientado a objetos reutilizables. Addison-Wesley.

Buschmann et al. (1995) A System of Patterns– Wiley

Larman, (1999) UML y Patrones. Introducción al análisis y diseño orientado a objetos – – Prentice Hall.

Brown, et al. (2004). AntiPatterns. Refactoring Software, Architectures and Projects in Crisis – Wiley.

 

Referencias en la web

The Portland Pattern Repository. Cunningham & Cunningham, Inc, , de Ward Cunningham.. http://www.c2.com/

Tips For Writing Pattern Languages, , de Ward Cunningham. http://www.c2.com/cgi/wiki?TipsForWritingPatternLanguages

Architypes.net – proyecto de lenguajes de patrón comunitarios de arquitectura http://www.architypes.net/pattern/categorizations

Liberating Voices! Proyecto de lenguajes de patrón, http://www.publicsphereproject.org/patterns/

El sitio de Christopher Alexander patternlanguage.com http://www.patternlanguage.com/

Ensayo sobre los lenguajes de patrón y su uso en el diseño urbano. Christopher Alexander . http://www.gardenvisit.com/history_theory/library_online_ebooks/architecture_city_as_landscape/christopher_alexanders_city_not_tree

El “problema de 2 sigma” y el aprendizaje ayudado por la tecnología en la Educación Universitaria.

Publicado por primera vez el 25 de marzo de 2013 en Aula Magna 2.0

 

Simplificando mucho, el futuro de la docencia universitaria ayudada con la tecnología, que en mayor o menor intensidad es toda, se dilucida en dos horizontes. Uno el del acceso abierto a los recursos formativos y a los fondos científicos, separando y adjudicando el valor al reconocimiento y acreditación de las competencias obtenidas en una pluralidad de opciones y métodos. El otro es el de la adaptación a los perfiles individuales de aprendizaje, utilizando las posibilidades de los entornos personales de gestión del conocimiento y de socialización de éste.

Estas líneas no son divergentes ni excluyentes, posiblemente el resultado o la configuración de la docencia universitaria integrará elementos de ambas tendencias. Sin embargo mientras tanto es conveniente el análisis detallado de los procesos, métodos y recursos. Y no sería bueno ignorar todo el bagaje de evidencias, investigaciones y teorías desarrolladas hasta ahora. Con esta intención consideramos pertinente traer el problema de 2 sigma: creemos que puede ilustrar y justificar orientaciones metodológicas con criterios de eficiencia pedagógica y avalar un modelo de docencia universitaria: la de la ayuda pedagógica individual, centrado en el aprendizaje, y en el alumno, en aprender haciendo, en avance basado en logros, la instrucción personalizada, y de evaluación formativa y basada en criterios.

Benjamín Bloom es conocido por su taxonomía (Bloom, 1956), que supuso un gran avance en el estudio de los dominios o niveles de aprendizaje. Fue un gran avance en efecto para el estudio de dominios cognitivos sobre todo.

Posteriormente, en un proceso de banalización de los que son tan frecuentes en la era del conocimiento (Evers, 2000 p.6, a través de Zapata-Ros, 2012 p.35) ciertos divulgadores de la pedagogía, o más bien simplificadores,  han tomado como referencia el esquema, ciertamente deslumbrante, para aplicarlo a aspectos, no siempre relacionados con el aprendizaje, vinculados con las actividades con ordenadores.

Estos divulgadores se han explayado con versiones triviales de la taxonomía de Bloom,  al tiempo que se han apropiado de su etiqueta. Por otro lado muchos de entre ellos han difundido pseudoteorías acerca de cómo se produce el aprendizaje en la era del conocimiento. Sin embargo pocos, o ninguno, ha reparado en un no menos importante trabajo. Se trata de (Bloom, 1984) The 2 Sigma Problem: The Search for Methods of Group Instruction as Effective as One-to-One Tutoring.

Lo hemos rescatado a partir de la lectura del post de  Donald Clark (April 26, 2012), en su blog Plan B sobre pedagogos y figuras históricas y la enseñanza, dedicado a Benjamin Bloom con el título Bloom (1913-1999) one e-learning paper you must read plus his taxonomy of learning.

La naturaleza del Problema 2 sigma lo describe en la pág. 4 (Bloom, 1984):

“Sin embargo, lo más llamativo de los resultados es que en las mejores condiciones de aprendizaje que podemos concebir (tutoría), el estudiante promedio es de 2 sigma por encima de la media de los estudiantes de control al que se ha enseñado con métodos convencionales de grupos de enseñanza.

El proceso de tutoría demuestra que la mayoría de los estudiantes tienen el potencial de llegar a este alto nivel de aprendizaje. Creo que una tarea importante de la investigación y la instrucción es buscar maneras de lograr esto en condiciones más prácticas y realistas que la tutoría uno-a-uno, que es demasiado costoso para la mayoría de las sociedades para llevar a gran escala. Este es el “2 sigma” problema. ¿Pueden los investigadores y profesores de enseñanza-aprendizaje idear condiciones que permitan a la mayoría de los estudiantes bajo la instrucción de grupo para alcanzar los niveles de logro que puede ser alcanzado en la actualidad sólo en condiciones buenas de tutoría?”

La investigación fue diseñada por dos estudiantes de doctorado en su tesis, y consistía en comparar el rendimiento de tres grupos de alumnos en tres ambientes de instrucción:

Dos estudiantes de la Universidad de Chicago, de doctorado en educación, Anania (1982,1983) y Burke (1984), en sus tesis doctorales comparan el aprendizaje de los estudiantes en las siguientes tres condiciones de la instrucción:

1. Convencional. Los estudiantes aprenden el tema en una clase con 30 alumnos por profesor. Se hacen pruebas periódicamente para calificar a los estudiantes.

2. Mastery Learning. Los estudiantes aprenden el tema en una clase con 30 alumnos por profesor. La instrucción es la misma que en la clase convencional (generalmente con el mismo maestro). Las pruebas son formativas (las mismas pruebas utilizadas con el grupo convencional) se realizan ahora para la retroalimentación, con procedimientos de corrección y pruebas formativas paralelas para determinar el grado en que los estudiantes han dominado el tema.

3. Tutoría. Los estudiantes aprenden la materia con un buen tutor para cada estudiante (o por dos o tres estudiantes al mismo tiempo). Esta instrucción-tutoría es seguida periódicamente por pruebas formativas, procedimientos correctivos de retroalimentación, y ensayos paralelos en formación como en las clases de dominio del aprendizaje. Cabe señalar que la necesidad de trabajos de reparación en virtud de tutoría es muy pequeña.

Los resultados de las curvas de la distribución de las puntuaciones en la evaluación sumativa correspondiente a los tres ambientes de instrucción fue:

zapata1

El efecto ponderado de las variables modificables en el rendimiento estudiantil fue:zapata2

Como vemos, y esa es la tesis del problema de las dos sigmas, la diferencia entre la cresta de las dos campanas de Gauss, es de dos veces la desviación típica, dos veces sigma. O si queremos la diferencia entre lo que afectan factores como la peer group influence y la tutoria instruccional es de CUARENTA PERCENTILES.

Evidentemente ese es un límite, es inviable social y económicamente un sistema instruccional que pueda mantener un tutor por un alumno. Pero nos indica que hay un horizonte en el rendimiento en el aprendizaje y en cómo organizar la educación. La investigación de Bloom tiene otra tesis y es la de que el trabajo de diseño instruccional tiene que barajar distintas posibilidades, de manera que coordinadas en una acción adecuada puedan conseguir un resultado cada vez más próximo a  ese límite (ya sabemos pues cual es la amplitud de la zona próxima de  Vigotsky, como mínimo DOS SIGMA):

zapata3

Hoy día con la tecnología y las redes, el problema de las dos sigmas se puede interpretar de una manera más amplia, su naturaleza la constituye además, y sobre todo, cómo saltar esa barrera con el concurso de las herramientas sociales, del proceso de la información contenida en el entorno del alumno, de la atención y del análisis a la elaboración del alumno en su material de elaboración y de relación. De la individualización del aprendizaje en definitiva. La influencia de los pares es un recurso que sabiamente utilizado, y mediante él, los alumnos atribuyen mucho más valor en según qué cosas a lo que dicen su pares. Y orientado hacia un objetivo, unos temas, unas actividades por un tutor o por un mentor, convierte los efectos, que en otro caso serían distractivos, en un factor de eficacia para el aprendizaje.

Una entrada como esta debería concluir aquí. Ya han visto que no he introducido la palabra MOOC en todo el texto, ni tampoco conectivismo. Si quieren concluyan en este punto. Sin embargo no me resisto a pensar y a relacionar lo dicho con los principios que inspiran los MOOCs y el conectivismo (Zapata-Ros,2012 y 2013) sobre todo a pensar en cómo se justifica la ausencia de los tutores, de la interacción profesor-alumno y de la evaluación formativa. Lean ustedes mismos y extraigan sus conclusiones.

Si analizásemos los resultados de los MOOCs en términos de consecución de los aprendizajes que implican los contenidos de los cursos el resultado podría ser similar al de este gráfico, en el que se ha incluido una nueva curva de Gauss:

zapata4

Naturalmente en una investigación esto tendría que ser adecuadamente diseñado. Para que la campana fuese equiparable habría que tomar una muestra del mismo tamaño que en el resto de grupos. Probablemente la curva estaría bastante más desplazada a la izquierda, el gráfico es optimista. Sería una atractiva tesis de doctorado.

Referencias.-

Bloom, B.S. (Ed.) (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of educational goals: Handbook I, cognitive domain. Longmans, Green.

Bloom, B. (1984). The 2 Sigma Problem: The Search for Methods of Group Instruction as ffective as One-to-One Tutoring, Educational Researcher, 13:6(4-16). http://www.comp.dit.ie/dgordon/Courses/ILT/ILT0004/TheTwoSigmaProblem.pdf

Clark, D. (April 26, 2012), el plan B, dedicado a Benjamin Bloom: Bloom (1913-1999) one e-learning paper you must read plus his taxonomy of learninghttp://donaldclarkplanb.blogspot.com.es/2012/04/bloom-1913-1999-one-e-learning-paper.html

Evers, H-D., (2000a) Working Paper No 335 Culturas Epistemológicas: Hacia una

Nueva Sociología del Conocimiento. https://www.uni-bielefeld.de/(de)/tdrc/ag_sozanth/publications/working_papers/wp335.pdf

Evers, Hans-Dieter, 2000b, “Globalisation, Local Knowledge, and the Growth of Ignorance: The Epistemic Construction of Reality”, Southeast Asian Journal of Social Science, 28,1: 13-22.

Zapata-Ros, M. (2012a) La calidad y los MOOCs (I): La interacción. Blog Redes abiertas. http://redesabiertas.blogspot.com.es/search/label/MOOC

Zapata-Ros, M. (2012b) La calidad y los MOOCs (II): La investigación y la evaluación de la calidad. Blog Redes abiertas. http://redesabiertas.blogspot.com.es/search/label/MOOC

Zapata-Ros, M. (2013a) MOOCs, una visión crítica. El valor no está en el ejemplar (II)Blog Redes abiertas. http://redesabiertas.blogspot.com.es/search/label/MOOC

Zapata-Ros, M. (2013b) MOOCs: Negar la evaluación, negar la metodología,…negar al estudiante Blog Redes abiertas. http://redesabiertas.blogspot.com.es/search/label/MOOC

Zapata-Ros, M. (2013c) MOOCs: Una visión crítica (III): La fundamentaciónBlog Redes abiertas. http://redesabiertas.blogspot.com.es/2013/02/moocs-una-vision-critica-iii-la.html

Zapata-Ros, M. (2013d) Una visión crítica (IV). ¿Sabemos qué son los MOOCs? Blog Redes abiertas. http://redesabiertas.blogspot.com.es/2013/02/una-vision-critica-iv-sabemos-que-son.html

Zapata-Ros, M. (2012c) ¿Es el “conectivismo” una teoría? ¿Lo es del aprendizaje? (I) Blog Redes abiertas. http://redesabiertas.blogspot.com.es/search/label/MOOC

Zapata-Ros, M. (2012d) ¿Es el “conectivismo” una teoría? ¿Lo es del aprendizaje? (II) Blog Redes abiertas. http://redesabiertas.blogspot.com.es/search/label/MOOC

Zapata-Ros, M. (2012e) ¿Es el “conectivismo” una teoría? ¿Lo es del aprendizaje? (III): Metacognición y elaboración Blog Redes abiertas. http://redesabiertas.blogspot.com.es/search/label/MOOC

Zapata-Ros, M. (2012f) ¿Es el “conectivismo” una teoría? ¿Lo es del aprendizaje? (y IV) Blog Redes abiertas. http://redesabiertas.blogspot.com.es/search/label/MOOC

Zapata-Ros, M. (2012g) ¿Conectivismo, conocimiento conectivo, conocimiento conectado… ?: Aprendizaje elaborativo en entornos conectados. Blog Redes abiertas. http://redesabiertas.blogspot.com.es/search/label/MOOC